1911Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking for a durable and rust resistant finish I can do myself and I heard nitride could be parkerized over and it made me wonder, can nitre bluing can be parkerized over?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
75,920 Posts
You can Parkerize over bluing (the military did it), but it really doesn't accomplish much. A modern coating over Parkerizing does a much better job of preventing corrosion.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Timsummer and mkk41

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,711 Posts
I have a couple pistols I've glass-beaded , parkerized and then had an industrial Teflon coating applied. The parkerizing acts as a ''primer'' does for paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,700 Posts
Although perhaps making no difference in this thread’s discussion, nitre blueing is not exactly the same as “regular” blueing. And it is usually applied only to certain parts, rarely is it applied to the entire gun.

But again, this might not matter in this particular discussion. If it matters, perhaps our OP could share more details. Just in case there’s more background to his question.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Timsummer

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,474 Posts
If your gun is already Nitrided, which is an excellent and durable finish, it would have to be media-blasted to do anything to it. I think a great finish would be Nitride over a blasted surface. For barrels, nitride over a machined surface. A gun that is blued can be Parkerized after media-blasting. Like already said, Parkerizing can be painted over if it has been de-greased or never oiled. If you want a black gun but Parkerized, Manganese Phosphate is gray to near-black, but bluing after Parkerizing can yield a matte-black finish. Simply bluing after blasting also yields a flat black finish and is called 'black oxide'. Oven-cured gun finishes are also durable over blasted steel and can even be effective over simple wire-brushing but there are a few tricks to get a lasting job with these..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
I've had good luck with applying grease to parkerized finishes and then letting them sit in the Tennessee sun. After a couple of hours, I wipe off the grease. Low tech, but it works well. I re-apply every couple of years. No corrosion yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,711 Posts
Back in the day , Indian and Harley-Davidson made extensive use of parkerizing on their motorcycle parts , even under painted parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,102 Posts
Probably the top modern gun coatings are......
Cerakote.
Lauer Dura-coat.
KG Gun Coat.
Brownell's Aluma-Hyde.

Several of these are offered by a number of gunsmith companies, or most can be done at home with a little care and attention.

Most of these are "paint type" epoxy based coatings that are sprayed on a prepared surface. Some require baking in an oven, some are air curing over a period of time ranging up to 3 weeks before reaching full hardness, but usable in a day or two.

In all of these, preparation is critical to getting a durable coating. The better job you do on degreasing and prep, the better and more durable the coating is.
Most recommend bead blasting (NOT "sand blasting") and careful degreasing.
The bead blasting gives the coating a "tooth" to adhere to.
A kitchen oven can be used to bake the coating.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,202 Posts
If you are patient and willing to do some a lot of hand work, and aren't looking for something as durable as Melonite/Tennifer or hard chrome, there is a product you could use that is a blue black finish that is applied cold and is more durable than the common hot salt bluing aka "black oxide" used on modern firearms. It is similar to parkerizing in that it is a phosphate finish. It is probably not as good as a real boiled in acid parkerizing job, but better than a hot salt blue.

Quoted from the Brownells website'
". . .For looks, the final finish was not intended to approach the beauty of the well-polished, hot-blued gun. It has developed, however, that in the hands of a careful craftsman, not only is the Oxpho-Blue finish beautiful, but it is also more durable and weather resistant than any other known chemical finish.. ."

The product is called Oxpho Blue if you are interested. Be warned it is a lot of work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
984 Posts
Oxpho is great stuff.. Works best when the metal is warm, (think oven on LOW or just the pilot). I've done entire rifles in Oxpho, both liquid and gel. At least as durable as bluing, albeit more "black" (or charcoal).

To compare, last spring I did a FEG with a Brownells Rust Blue - wasn't as much work as most articles insisted, and I was doing multiple coats all weekend. Oxpho is easier, but the "before" and "between coats" work is pretty much identical. This too was a very satisfactory coating. Only wear appearing is on the outer-surfaces most abraded by holster. Same as any other coating.

If nothing else, I'd keep some Oxpho on hand for "oh****" touchups.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
If your gun is already Nitrided, which is an excellent and durable finish, it would have to be media-blasted to do anything to it. I think a great finish would be Nitride over a blasted surface. For barrels, nitride over a machined surface. A gun that is blued can be Parkerized after media-blasting. Like already said, Parkerizing can be painted over if it has been de-greased or never oiled. If you want a black gun but Parkerized, Manganese Phosphate is gray to near-black, but bluing after Parkerizing can yield a matte-black finish. Simply bluing after blasting also yields a flat black finish and is called 'black oxide'. Oven-cured gun finishes are also durable over blasted steel and can even be effective over simple wire-brushing but there are a few tricks to get a lasting job with these..
My understanding is that the OP has a gun that is nitre blued, not nitrided. Totally different finishes, as you're probably aware.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,527 Posts
That is what he SAID, but I wonder, nitre blue is a heat blue, normally done only on small parts. Ordinary hot blue is in a nitrate solution. Nitride is a surface hardening process that just happens to blacken the metal, too.
Lots of words sounding sort of alike there.

Any road, the INSTRUCTIONS say to bead or grit blast before Parkerizing which would remove any existing finish... except maybe nitride. Some Glocks were said to be phosphated over Tenifer nitride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,138 Posts
Parkerize is one of the best finishes humans have come up with. The United States Marine Corps were told to abuse it - and they couldn't hurt it and THOSE GUYS can break ANYTHING. The War Department ( I love that name) went with Park. I have guns over 30 years old that were Parked and they have never rusted and still look like new.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top