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Pistol Profile – Sig Sauer/German Sport Guns (GSG) 1911-22

The Sig/GSG 1911-22 is one of a very few full-size 1911-style 22LR pistols. It is very very close to the size and weight of a classic 1911 and has the same feel, making it a great practice gun. And, it has a threaded barrel. American Tactical Imports (ATI) is the importer for GSG. ATI has announced but not delivered a target version. Read the instructions carefully. The screw on the side of frame must be loosened or removed to breakdown the pistol. This requires establishing a new point of aim every time its adjusted. See the third party references below.

“The 1911-22 is built to the same dimensions as the full-sized 1911 pistol. It features a lightweight metal frame and slide, low-profile three-dot sights, working grip safety and ambidextrous thumb safety, making the 1911-22 a perfect training tool for 1911 fans as well as a fun plinking pistol for all ages.”
From Sig Sauer website

Available from Sig Sauer in black and camo finish
Available from ATI in black and desert camo

Caliber: .22LR
Action Type: SAO
Trigger Pull: DA N/A
Trigger Pull: SA 4.2 lbs - 5.6 lbs
Overall Length: 8.5 in
Overall Height: 5.5 in
Overall Width: 1.4 in
Barrel Length: 5.0 in
Sight Radius: 5.4 in
Weight w/Mag: 34.0 oz
Mag Capacity: 10 Rounds
Sights: Contrast sights
Grips: Wood
PTFE Frame and Slide Finish
No Accessory Rail
High Velocity (HV) Ammo Recommended
Skeletonized hammer and trigger
MSRP $419.00

Exerpted from the Gun Digest review included here:"
In terms of construction, the GSG-1911 does exhibit some differences as compared to a true 1911. First, the slide of the GSG-1911 is aluminum and the frame/receiver body of the pistol is cast Zinc #Z410 (Zamak), which gives it a heft that totally absorbs the miniscule recoil of either standard or high-velocity .22LR rounds, making it an ideal gun for new shooters. While some of you may be put off by a 1911 frame that is constructed of zinc as opposed to aluminum or steel, you won’t know it is zinc by the appearance, which is a pleasant matte gray. It took me awhile to figure out what the frame was made out of. I finally emailed the factory. You won’t recognize it as Zamak, at least externally. Where you will notice the Zamak construction — if you are a 1911 aficionado — is in terms of weight distribution.

The GSG is grip heavy, enhanced by the light weight of the aluminum slide. Here’s the thing though — because of the materials used in its construction, you can purchase this pistol for about $339 retail. Sure, they could make the frame out of steel, but that would shoot the cost up by at least $200 a copy. Considering the low pressures involved with the .22LR cartridge, there shouldn’t be any significant wear and tear on the frame. The slide is marked .22LRHV but the owner’s manual advises that the gun is set to work with either standard or high-velocity rounds. For what I envision the uses of this pistol . . ."


Here is a GSG/ATI version of the 1911-22


Compatibility
Parts that will swap from a regular 1911 to this GSG/Sig:
Thumb safety
Grip safety
MSH
Hammer
Hammer strut
mainspring
Grips
Slide stop
Plunger tube
Disconnector

Parts that do not swap or may swap with some modifications:
Trigger
Sear
Mag release
Firing pin
Firing pin stop
Firing pin spring
Firing pin plunger
Grip screws
Grip bushings
Ejector
Extractor
Plunger and springs for plunger tube
Barrel bushings

Here is a Sig Sauer version of the 1911-22 in its new camo dress


To Zinc, or not to Zinc? That is the Question
From The Truth About Guns, Joe Grine, March 2012
One thing that may make the GSG 1911 less attractive to some potential purchasers is the fact that the slide is made out of die cast zinc alloy. The use of zinc alloys is common on .22 guns that are trying to both replicate larger center-fire pistols, and also keep the price point below $500.00.

Some folks in the shooting community dismissively refer to die cast zinc as “pot metal.” These “Zincophobes” won’t touch a zinc alloy gun with a 100-foot pole. Because the .22LR can only generate a small amount of force to push the slide rearward, it is obvious that the slide on a .22 caliber 1911 clone needs to be extremely light weight. That’s why Ruger Mark II’s and other steel .22s don’t have a slide like a typical centerfire semi-auto pistol.

But if you want to replicate a modern semi-auto pistol gun featuring a full-sized, reciprocating slide, you can’t use heavy steel unless you mill out a bunch of expensive lightening cuts. Even then, reliability will be iffy. Thus in the GSG 1911, the need for a lightweight slide means that the only three possible metal alloys they could use are aluminum, titanium, or a zinc alloy. Figure cost into the mix and zinc alloy becomes the natural choice: GSG wanted to hit a price point in that $350 range and that necessitates the use of zinc.

After putting a few thousand rounds through both the GSG 522 SD and the GSG 1911, I can honestly say that I don’t have any major concerns about the use of zinc in the slide. Perhaps if you are going to be putting 50,000 to 100,000 round a year through your gun, you may want to buy the Kimber. (I have no personal experience with the Kimber, but I would assume that the aluminum frame and slide would wear better than zinc). But for most people who will just use the gun for range plinking or competition a few times a month, I don’t anticipate any serious issues with longevity.

Third Party Support for This Pistol
There are a few things that can be added or replaced on this pistol to improve its overall performance.
GSG Pro
http://www.gsgpro.com

Nic Taylor
http://nictaylor00.blogspot.com/2012/11/gsg-sig-1911-22lr-basepads-and-followers.html

ZR Tactical Solutions - ZRTS
http://www.zrtacticalsolutions.com/

Chet Whistle Accessories - CWA
http://www.cwaccessories.com/Products.html

Here is mine with a CWA performance kit, main spring housing, and slide. The compensator is by Tactical Solutions.
 

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Pistol Profile – Sig Sauer/German Sport Guns (GSG) 1911-22



Exerpted from the Gun Digest review included here:"
In terms of construction, the GSG-1911 does exhibit some differences as compared to a true 1911. First, the slide of the GSG-1911 is aluminum and the frame/receiver body of the pistol is cast Zinc #Z410 (Zamak),



To Zinc, or not to Zinc? That is the Question
From The Truth About Guns, Joe Grine, March 2012
One thing that may make the GSG 1911 less attractive to some potential purchasers is the fact that the slide is made out of die cast zinc alloy.
I have been looking for a 22lr.
Does anyone know which of these comments is correct? Is the slide aluminum or a Zinc alloy??


Sled
 

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What I have read about the construction material of the gsg 1911 slide. Originally the slide was made by an Italian firm and constructed from aluminum. Production and shipping problems arose and soon slides were made locally out of a zinc alloy. More recently newer gsgs are once again made from an aluminum alloy.
 
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