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I done something a little stupid a couple weeks ago and just wanted some feedback.My Kimber Custom Classic was running pretty good after buying some Wilson Mags but I checked the clearance at the top of the feed ramp to the bottom edge of the chamber and it was less than .032".Using a Dremel and a bullet shape stone I machined material out of just the bottomhalf of the chamber but actually removed more material than I wanted to and wound up with about .037". The grinding stone was actually not as fine as I needed and I had to take some 220 grit sandpaper and handsand some of the grooves left by the dremel. I then polished to a mirror like finish with flitz but was unable to get a couple "grooves" out for fear of going too far with my "experiment".They were off center more to the sides of the feeding area so I stopped. it then hit my mind, what if I removed too much,Iv'e heard the term over-throating.I took the gun to the range and fired 80 rounds, 16 rds of which were +P 200gr goldots, 14rds 230gr Golden Sabers with no malfunctions.But I'm still concerned that I may have done a bad thing and it's just not shown up yet. How much is too much in terms of removing material from feed area and was this 80rd. session a fair enough trial to breath easy again ?
 

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Originally posted by Doc Glockiday:
My Kimber Custom Classic was running pretty good ...
Another case of - "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" !!!

As along as your gun continues to function reliably (I'd put another couple hundred rounds thru it to be sure), I'd say no harm was done.

Without seeing the contour and amount of material removed, it is hard to say with any certainty, however. Removing material from the bottom of the chamber leads me to believe you MAY have created a bigger unsupported area for the cartridge case to rupture. Of course, this is a worst case scenario, but you may want to have a pro look at it.



[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 08-24-2001).]
 

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I'm not a fan of throating and polishing at the kitchen table, opting instead to have a 'smith do that kind of thing. Just a personal preference.....

I'm also a hardball guy, so I REALLY don't worry with throating and polishing. Sounds like you need to secure about five hundred rounds of various ammo designs and test your gunsmithing job out at the range. Look at the bright side, great fun.


Callahan
 

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No, you didn't hurt anything(LOL)but you could have...you can unsupport a low pressure cartridge like a .45 a lot more than that...I won't give you the measurement here because I don't want a "newbie" to think they can go after barrel mouths with Dremmels and there not be consequences...I would double check the symmetry of the reduction...Take the barrel out of the gun and put a shell casing in the chamber...look at the uniformity of the reduction... compare
the "line" of the barrel mouth to the line of the web of the cartridge...IT should be parallel...if you can't see it scribe a line with a sharp needle or metal pointer on the brass ...use the edge of the barrel mouth as a guide...this will show you if your reduction is uniform..if you do this first and then after your reduction you can measure the amount of reduction with calipers...Better safe than sorry!

Barry
 

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Dremel Tools and 1911s, bad juju.

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Jim:

That's why I won't buy one of those evil devices.

If ever there was an inanimate object out to stir up trouble, it's a Dremel.


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"The problem with the world is that everyone is a few drinks behind."
Humphrey Bogart
 

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Well, I've never hacked at one of my pistols with my Dremel but they do have uses. I would imagine if you were fitting a beavertail, a Dremel would be very handy for removing the excess frame material. Same for lowering and/or flaring an ejection port, relieving the front strap/trigger guard area, etc.

I think what usually happens is the hobbyist gets the notion to make a modification, then proceeds without taking the time on setup. Things like solid fixturing & guide lines are not addressed, the work is freehand, & before you know it....!!

Diamond files, emery paper, & stones are a much safer approach to barrel & feedramp work!
 

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O.K. I admit it, very stupid ideal, but my little voice in the ol' head said "Why pay a smith to do it, besides It'll be fun." That little voice has been known to get me in trouble in the past.You guys would have really been amused to have seen me shoot the first couple rounds. Kinda had the ol' rabbit in the headlights look. Well, still got my hand. Guess I'll try couple hundred more rounds and then maybe I'll feel at ease.
 

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One "safe" use for a Dremel tool and 1911's is as follows:

You can cut the end off of a Q-Tip, chuck it up in the Dremel, coat it with Jeweler's Rouge, and polish away. The combination of the Q-Tip and rouge is not enough to get you into trouble, but can make very short work out of polishing. I use this method to polish feed ramps and chamber entrances, ad get very good results with no worry. You get nice shiny and smooth results with this method.

The best Q-tips to use are the ones with a plastic shaft, however the original wound paper shaft ones will work, but won't last as long.
 
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