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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The back rivet on the plunger tube assembly loosened from the frame on my classic custom. I've only been seriously into .45s for the last three years. Is this a common problem ? Can a local smith be trusted to fix it or should I bother a real pro about it?
 

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Send it back to at their expense and have them install a new part. I had an Ultra carry that came brand new w/ the rear stud improperly swaged on and all messed up. You can see the crimps through the ejection port w/ the slide locked back. Tell them to also use some red loctite when they replace the tube
Sandster
 

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Originally posted by Spitpatch:
The back rivet on the plunger tube assembly loosened from the frame on my classic custom. I've only been seriously into .45s for the last three years. Is this a common problem ? Can a local smith be trusted to fix it or should I bother a real pro about it?
I just had this happen to me on my Colt Defender. From what I have heard when I posted to the group, this is an easy fix.

You can fix it yourself in one of two ways:
1) Get Red Loctite (permanent) and a vice grip. Put the Loctite in the loose rivet, and use the vice grips (padded to not mar the frame) to hold the tube in place for about 2 hours. Should cure completely in 24 hours. I went this route and it seems like a cheap solution to the problem.

2) Buy a plunger tube tool from Brownells. They have two that cost from $30 - 50. The $50 tool looks the most complete. I chose not to go that route because I figured if the loctite didn't work, I could always take it to a smith and have them do it in 5 minutes.

Or, for any smith with the proper tools, like I said, this is a 5 minute fix.

[This message has been edited by Gun Nut (edited 11-20-2001).]
 

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No offense to Gun Nuts, but I still say replace the part! The locktite only or re-swaging the old part back on may work, but you don't know how much metal fatigue that rear stud, which is very thin to begin with, has endured and if it should come loose in a defensive situation it could be a disaster. The tube could move away from the frame enough to allow the plunger itself to pop out over the safety, and you would be unable to get the gun off "safe" without the aid of a small tool to depress the plunger.
 

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If you have a local smith have him replace with new and use red loctite or better yet silver solder it in place. This is one of the week points on a 1911 but can be taken care of.
 

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I had the same problem on my Classic Royal.
Since it was new, I sent it back to Kimber. Mailed it Monday and had it back in my hands that Friday...and I live in CA!
 

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I've been shooting Colt 1911's and clones for over forty years. I've had more than 20 of them. 1911's are the only handguns I own and shoot and carry.

If you are a serious 1911 shooter you will have the plunger tube come loose on one of your pistols at some time. The plunger tube is the weakest part of the Browning 1911 design.

You should check the plunger tube tightness every time you detail strip your 1911.

Take my advice and buy the vise grip restaking tool from Brownells. You'll need it someday. It's easy to use. You can get your money back by charging other 1911 shooters $ 5 to tighten theirs.

I would use Locktite plus restake but would not trust Locktite alone.

If the plunger tube comes loose during shooting your pistol could be out of action.



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