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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw this and a video review for two and I thought, "What a great place for The Tourist to (pardon the pun) polish up his sword polishing before taking on that Katana he has in mind.

The Kershaw Camp 18 (Last I looked it was under $50 on **zon.):



http://kershaw.kaiusaltd.com/knives/knife/camp-18

From what I gather the 65MN carbon steel used is similar to 1065. It would be interesting to see just what could be done with it taken to a polished and tuned edge.

Strap the sheath to the a fork on the bike and bad 70s biker movie meets equally cheesy zombie flick!

You never know when killer cheese rolls or raging cacti might attack.

Seriously though, the Camp series seem to be getting some great reviews from the people who actually use them for yard and camp work and not just the backyard ninjas.

Sometimes ya just gotta have fun.
 

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Saw this and a video review for two and I thought, "What a great place for The Tourist to (pardon the pun) polish up his sword polishing before taking on that Katana he has in mind.

The Kershaw Camp 18 (Last I looked it was under $50 on **zon.):



http://kershaw.kaiusaltd.com/knives/knife/camp-18

From what I gather the 65MN carbon steel used is similar to 1065. It would be interesting to see just what could be done with it taken to a polished and tuned edge.

Strap the sheath to the a fork on the bike and bad 70s biker movie meets equally cheesy zombie flick!

You never know when killer cheese rolls or raging cacti might attack.

Seriously though, the Camp series seem to be getting some great reviews from the people who actually use them for yard and camp work and not just the backyard ninjas.

Sometimes ya just gotta have fun.





DAMN!!!!:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Priorities in selecting a knife.

never mind, posted in wrong place.
 

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Careful what you wish for...

I just checked the Kershaw page on Blue Ridge, yup, I'm a dealer for that model.

$35.98 to me. I figure 200 to 250 bucks to polish it. Any takers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Careful what you wish for...

I just checked the Kershaw page on Blue Ridge, yup, I'm a dealer for that model.

$35.98 to me. I figure 200 to 250 bucks to polish it. Any takers?
:rofl: You gonna do that one proper Togishi style or in your usual heretical biker self?

A guy has to ask himself what he wants to be holding in a zombie apocalypse. A polished Kershaw Camp 18 or a straight off ebay, Chinese made, 1045 steel Katana impersonation? Which would Tallahassee choose.

Secretly I'm digging that blade as a guilty pleasure. Like digging the Carpenters even though you only listened to Zeppelin or the Stones around people you associated with. ;) Forget the Sledgeomatic, turn me loose at a melon stand with that. :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OY! Haven't they learned that by now zombie green and that symbol are so ingrained into the modern psyche that once people become infected they will instantly recognize marked tools. Better the stealth of a fancy machete like camp knife.

Besides the crotch rocketeers and the sport tourers always talk about cruiser riders and going around dressing like pirates. The Camp 18 fits the image better. ;)

I really would like to handle one of those and do a little cutting with it. Then again, there's a part of me who thinks he's still young and might actually throw a rucksack on and hit the trail. He's delusional and wishful thinking at the same time, but never quite goes away.
 

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I'd love to see it polished. Only problem is the "finished pic" would take a whole deck of cards to show.:D All kidding aside I have been enjoying the recent posts in the blade forum & the wicked edge photos. Great work The Tourist.
 

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Back when I worked for Gander Mountain I did polish a machete. I believe the guy was headed to Panama, or some such country. They had found some undeveloped land and they were going to build an hotel.

He did stress that weapons were frowned upon, but everyone their uncle had a machete. Frankly, a polished machete would only be good for one thing, and it ain't coconuts. The metal is pretty soft, and the edge was going to wilt faster than a Kenyan president's promise.

If you were going to use it, wouldn't a Ninjato be a better investment?
 

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I would just bring a file with me.

And wait until I got to Panama. Then just buy a machete down there. You will get it cheaper. Then just use the file to sharpen it from time to time like the locals that use them all the time do. A machete is a tool that will get used up over time, not a fashion statement.

As for polishing though. I have a question. Some time ago I purchased a World war 1 era bayonet made by Remington. It looked like it had been buried in the ground next to a salt mine for about fifty years when I got it. Now I have been working it over for many, many hours with Mother's mag polish and with Never Dull. It looks fairly respectable now. Certainly better than it has looked in a very long time.

My problem is that I have come to a plateau on the polish. It looks pretty good. But if possible I would like to get it to be "parade ground" bright.

Anyone have any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you were going to use it, wouldn't a Ninjato be a better investment?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_N4hprpRJhM

I'll take a good pliable machete over a stainless sword anyday. I'm betting the duff from QVC in the video will now too. :D The sad part is they were marketing them as practice swords.

Actually, I used to take an old corn knife, which is pretty much a midwest farm version of a machete, to the woods as a kid and use it to cut down saplings. It did a pretty good job and was just a rusty old bit of carbon steel.

I've actually taken a 1040 steel, cheap katana type to some tree limbs just for the heck of it and to see what it would do. Prior to using it on the limbs it would slice copy paper cleanly. When I got done it was a little, uh, bent, wavy, not perfectly aligned all the way from stem to stern, and just enough off to not want to fully slide into the saya. Not mangled mind you in the sense of all over the place, but just not fully straight. The edge might not have cleanly severed paper for it's full length, but it was still sharp enough to inflict damage. The sword held enough edge to still cut, but bent enough not to break with an imperfect hit. Which when you get down to it is what is should do. Some just hold up better and last longer than others.

Stainless display swords are more dangerous to the wielder than anyone. They break instead of bend.

Now if you were to suggest a 5160 spring steel, well made and ground tattykill Wakizashi type that might work. But it would cost more.

Besides, just in the U.S. machetes are the tool of a number of trendy criminals. https://www.google.com/search?q=mac...4&sourceid=chrome&espv=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8

I just want a classier, better balanced one. ;)
 

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I've seen that piece of video several times. That's why I bought a real katana. Most are wall hangers.

My issue with a machete is the steel, it's softer. You'd pay me a fortune to sharpen it, then use it a few times and the thing would be dull. I think this is a tool where a very toothy edge might be a better choice.
 

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Amos when you say Corn Knife.

Are you referring to the ones that look like an oversized bread knife? If so it is funny because they sell them here in VA as tobacco knives. They also sell the same thing in parts of Louisiana as cane knives. Who'da thunk it?
 

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I think this is a tool where a very toothy edge might be a better choice.
I was wondering why no one said this ^^^...until you did...

I agree. And a bit of thicker grind/inclusive angle. This thing ain't gonna be used for razor thin tomato slicing...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I've seen that piece of video several times. That's why I bought a real katana. Most are wall hangers.

My issue with a machete is the steel, it's softer. You'd pay me a fortune to sharpen it, then use it a few times and the thing would be dull. I think this is a tool where a very toothy edge might be a better choice.
Yeah, I agree. Polish for real use would be lost. A good working edge is more appropriate for something like that in real world terms. But ya gotta admit, it would sure make a zombie hunting mall ninja have warm, uh, squirmy dreams. :D

Are you referring to the ones that look like an oversized bread knife? If so it is funny because they sell them here in VA as tobacco knives. They also sell the same thing in parts of Louisiana as cane knives. Who'da thunk it?
Kinda, yep. In southern Ohio we our version of a tobacco knife looked more like a straight grip hatchet with a slim, square blade at the end for cutting the stalk. They were usually carried with a sharp metal cone for putting on the end of a tobacco stick to split the stalk and run the plant onto the stick. Most guys would stick the cone on the end of their tobacco knife when carrying to and from or taking a break. I still remember one local fellow who had his tip in his back pocket, point down, and forgot about it when he hopped up to sit on a wagon bed and ended up doing himself some damage.

No reason you couldn't use what we called a corn knife for cutting tobacco though. Same thing. Thin, sharp blade that was tall enough to stay straight going through a stalk while cutting, hard enough to hold enough edge, but not so hard that it couldn't flex and would break instead.

I look at some of the "antiques" that people hang on their walls sometimes trying get that "Country Living" look and have to shake my head. We used to get looked down on for gear like that. Now it's a desirable collectable. I had a heck of a time finding a decent deal on an used drawknife back when I was messing around making some walking sticks because all the danged city folk and neuvo country were snatching them up for their walls and collections.
 

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I am not sure that we are talking about the same thing.

Cane knives, corn knives, tobacco knives, whatever but it is no big deal. We all know that we are talking about large cheap working knives designed for a purpose. Made cheaply with the understanding that they would generally be rode hard and put up wet.

As far as the dream weavers sucking this stuff up for décor is concerned. Well we see it all of the time around here as well. I happened upon a really nice tuttle tooth two man crosscut saw not long ago. for the princely sum of five dollars at a flea market. It did not look to me as if the teeth had ever even been set. The paper label was still on the blade. As I was carrying it out to my truck a woman noticed it and remarked. "Oh that will certainly look nice over your fireplace."

Little did she know that this was going to go into storage with my new crosscut saw that I bought last year for over a hundred bucks from the last manufacturer of crosscut saws left in the US. Some people just can not imagine what a world would be like if gasoline was not freely available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Our corn knife was more like a square ended machete for outdoor work, but in a sort of non descript way. Sounds like you may be talking more of a kitchen utensil. Maybe for taking the cooked corn off the cob for canning.

The fireplace comment reminded me of when I was first looking for my draw knife. There used to be a bi-annual antique show that would come to Castroville, TX each year. I would go to look around and remember that stuff being around and us using it. Those fancy folks looked down on us when we were actually using that stuff. Now here they were buying this stuff at crazy prices to decorate with. I was shocked when I was looking for a simple butter mold to see prices in the triple digits. I just wanted one to go with the Dazy churn I still had that as a kid I got stuck cranking for my mother to make butter from the week's cream from our Gurnsey and on the offhand chance I might actually use it again someday.

Well sir, at this one show I'm at this booth with a good selection of hand powered tools and these two gals are picking up things and yackin. One of them decides to buy a brace (hand cranked drill for those who don't know) and she turns to her friend and says, "I don't know what this is, but it will look great on the wall." I had to walk away before I said or did something very ungentlemanly. I walked away thinking that there are folks who would like to get their hands on tools like that to actually use, but can't because folks like that either scoop them up, or drive the prices to high for a guy to afford it.

One of the many things my great granddaddy, who I idolized as a kid, had around that I wish I had of his was sitting in a junk pile. It was one of those big sharpening wheels. The kind one person would crank while another at on the little seat and sharpened knives and tools. The kind that had the little tin can or cup dangling over it with the hole in it that you filled with water and it trickled onto the stone. I used to crank the handle on that as a tyke just to watch it spin. That would be just so sweet to have and use now.

Hmpf. I don't know if I should go get a shot of Geritol or a shot of Knob Creek Bourbon now. I get the feeling I'll creak just a bit more than usual when I get up from here. ;) Maybe I'll see if I can find Bonnie Raitt and John Prine's rendition of "Angel From Montgomery" so I can feel like a real fossil.
 

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It was one of those big sharpening wheels. The kind one person would crank while another at on the little seat and sharpened knives and tools.
Oh, yeah, the infamous Jed Clampett wheel. I love those things...

The damage those wheels have caused has brought me more business than a bikini bartender at Sturgis. I think they should have one of these wheels in all public town squares for everyone to use.

You have to figure this, though. Jed Clampett was a millionaire, and when he over-ground a knife or ruined the temper, he just bought the entire cutlery company and got a new one...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I was up the road a bit today at my parents and getting some stuff out of storage. One of the things I came across and brought back was a short Tramontina. It's too short to be really called a machete, yet it is more machete than knife. I also brought back my favorite axe and a hatchet to clean up and do some practice on at some point.

USMM, I got a gander at that old Dazy churn, a couple of large crocks my parents used to make wine in and two old wine presses they used. My arms got tired just looking at that churn. ;)
 
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