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I'm fixing to go at my feed ramp with a dremel polishing wheel. What type of polishing compound is recommended for such a procedure? Any hints? How long do I go at it at what speed?
 

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You do not need polishing compound or a dremel.

Use very fine sand paper on a dowel stick. IF you use a dremel, only use it after the dowel stick to polish up and go lightly with it using a fine cratex polishing point.
 

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Use a 3/8 dowel wrapped with 320 wet and dry paper lubricated with soapy water. Make two or three passes and check your work. Don't change the contour or the angle. Don't try for a mirror finish. Don't try to remove all the machining marks. The fact that your were going to "go at" the ramp to polish it indicates you may need to do a bit of reading to understand how the ramp is designed to work.
 

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SevenL4...

Thanks for the great "How-To". Really appreciate the specifics.

What's the recommendation for how often a feed ramp should be polished? :scratch:
 

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facilitator said:
SevenL4...

Thanks for the great "How-To". Really appreciate the specifics.

What's the recommendation for how often a feed ramp should be polished? :scratch:
It's not something you do occasionally, you do it once (if at all). I have a couple guns with rough looking feedramps that shoot flawlessly. Why mess with it?

be advised, if you go too far and change the angle of the ramp or make it TOO "slippery" you can seriously jack up your pistol.
 

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The sole and ONLY reason for "polishing" a feed ramp is if you have bullets catching on a rough feed ramp.
If the bullets aren't catching...... you DO NOT need a polish job.

When we talk about "Polishing" a feed ramp, what we really mean is SMOOTHING a feed ramp.
People hear "polish" and think "Like a mirror".
When they try for a mirror bright polish job, the feed ramp is OVER-polished, and the gun then starts to have problems it didn't have before.

So why do custom pistols have a mirror-like feed ramp?
Simple. The customer pays us for a "polish job" and when he gets back a gun with a SMOOTH but not mirror shiny feed ramp, he figures we ripped him off by taking money for something we didn't do.
So, we put on a mirror bright polish so the customer will know we did our job.

Again, if it ain't broke, DON'T FIX IT.
If you absolutely just can't stand it, use a good metal polish like Flitz, Mother's Mag, MAAS or any other good polish on a rag or Q-tip to "Polish" the feed ramp.
 

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My theory on grinding, polishing, or tightening is - just when you want to go a "little bit more" - STOP.
It is in our nature (at least mine) to go to far and regret it. :rolleyes:
 

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acoilfld said:
My theory on grinding, polishing, or tightening is - just when you want to go a "little bit more" - STOP.
It is in our nature (at least mine) to go to far and regret it. :rolleyes:
I cut that hole three times and it's still too big!!
 

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acoilfld said:
My theory on grinding, polishing, or tightening is - just when you want to go a "little bit more" - STOP.
It is in our nature (at least mine) to go to far and regret it. :rolleyes:
In 28 years of doing this 1911 thing by the time a customer reaches this stage it's already too late.

To the OP, why do you want to do this? Do you actually have a feeding issue or is it something you just heard about?

If you have a feeding issue there are other areas I'd look at first. Specifically magazine release timing and ammunition.

If your pistol is feeding fine I'd leave well enough alone because you won't improve anything and have a greater chance of doing greater harm than good.
 

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stdon said:
In 28 years of doing this 1911 thing by the time a customer reaches this stage it's already too late.

To the OP, why do you want to do this? Do you actually have a feeding issue or is it something you just heard about?

If you have a feeding issue there are other areas I'd look at first. Specifically magazine release timing and ammunition.

If your pistol is feeding fine I'd leave well enough alone because you won't improve anything and have a greater chance of doing greater harm than good.

Yeah, what all these folks said. I have never polished a feed ramp. I have seen the result of several polishing jobs that were botched. It ain't pretty and it is usually pretty expensive.

FWIW

dj
 

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My favorite polish is Mothers Mag Aluminum Polish. You can find it in most auto parts stores near the car wash supplies. It's formulated to polish aluminum wheels, so it's not aggressive on steel parts. For sticky feed ramps, I mix a dab of polish with a drop of oil and smear it on the small felt drum of my dremel. I just hit the ramp at a low speed for no more than 3 seconds. I've used this stuff to polish non-critical areas like trigger bows, the sides of the sear and hammer, Series 80 safety parts, etc. It's not aggressive enough to give you a mirror surface or even remove light scratches. It just slicks up the parts a tiny bit.
 

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dremel

For a novice, polishing a feed ramp is not a good idea. Read up on how a bullet actually gets from the magazine to the chamber and understand it before you even think of getting the tools out.
 

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If you're using Simichrome and a Dremel with the soft, white, cylindrical polishing pad that's attached to a mandrel with a screw, and the Dremel is on its lowest speed, you'd have to be pretty determined to screw up a polishing job. It'd be REALLY hard to overpolish.
 

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WalterGC said:
If you're using Simichrome and a Dremel with the soft, white, cylindrical polishing pad that's attached to a mandrel with a screw, and the Dremel is on its lowest speed, you'd have to be pretty determined to screw up a polishing job. It'd be REALLY hard to overpolish.
Sounds like a challenge to me! :mummy:
 

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Don't do it, nothing good can come from it. I don't want to sound too ornery, but your comments lead me to believe you've got no idea what you're doing, no idea why you're doing it and have a great possibility of screwing up a handgun for good. Once you change the feedramp geometry and/or polish through the anodizing, it's a hunk of scrap metal.
 
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