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On the Kimber area I posted an inquiry concerning the relibaility and durability of polymer frames. Since other than Kimber produced polymer framed 1911s, I thought I would ask in the General Gun Discussion area.

I am considering a Kimber polymer framed 1911 (Stainless Ten II), but I am interested in the pros and cons of polymer frames. STI and Wilson produce ploymer framed guns.

Anyone with good or bad to say about polymer frames?

Thanks,
 

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I don't own a polymer 1911, but I do own a couple of other polymer pistols (P99, Sig Pro), and personally have no problems with them. I think most anti-polymer feelings are more subjective or emotional than rational at this point. Polymer has been around long enough now that we know it'll hold up, its lighter, you don't have to worry about corrosion--its got lots of positive attributes. Now, if someone wants to say "I'm a traditionalist and I hate polymer on a 1911" I can totally respect that. But from a functionality standpoint polymer works well.
 

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I currently have a Ruger KP-97DC and I am very happy with it. Besides reducing recoil a bit, it has proven very durable, as I have almost 4,000 rounds through it with no problems whatsoever. It is lighter and stronger than an alloy frame. Plus, where else can you find a .45 autoloader with a decocker for under 300.00 NEW?? ($329.95 with 40.00 rebate)
Also I have been told by a Wilson Master Dealer that Bill Wilson went with a polymer frame on the KZ series because they were more durable than alloy frames. You can find a good number of people on this forum who have worn out alloy frames by 20,000 rounds. With such great luck with my Ruger, my KZ compact I will be ordered in 2 weeks to time delivery with my tax refund!!!! :D

Oh yes, you do have to watch certain solvents and cleaners around the ploymer frame.
 

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I think most anti-polymer feelings are more subjective or emotional than rational at this point.
Robert M. Pirsig was driven to the point of insanity attempting to define the word "quality". After his recovery, he stated that it was "the pursuit of excellence".

I grew up a long time ago when excellence meant precisely machined steel, handcrafted wood and supple leather. Well, times have changed. You can now have your firearms "crafted" out of fine polymer. Holsters can be made from tough synthetics. You can buy synthetic western boots made in China too but my name isn't on the waiting list.

If the value you place on a firearm is such that it is immaterial whether it is finely crafted or popped out of a mold, you know what to buy. If you place a high value on "the pursuit of excellence", you may have a fondness for finely crafted steel and wood. I don't want to own just another black gun. I want something that displays some personal values and personality.

I prefer metal guns. If I want to I can hard-chrome or plate them. I can bead blast them or have them coated with high technology finishes.

If I don't like my grips, I can change them. I can have fat grips or skinny grips; scrimshawed grips, ivory grips, antler or wood. I have choices.

It is not simply a matter of "hating" polymer guns or whether they are reliable or accurate. It is about the value that you, personally, place on your arms.

Me? I'm old and hard to get along with. Give me cold steel, fine hardwood and soft, supple leather any day.
 

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JosephH1 said:
Oh yes, you do have to watch certain solvents and cleaners around the ploymer frame.
As long as you stick with normal gun solvents you shouldn't have a problem. I've even used automotive spray brake cleaner without ill effect. Just don't try anything really powerful, both for your sake and the guns!
 

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nemesis said:

If the value you place on a firearm is such that it is immaterial whether it is finely crafted or popped out of a mold, you know what to buy. If you place a high value on "the pursuit of excellence", you may have a fondness for finely crafted steel and wood. I don't want to own just another black gun. I want something that displays some personal values and personality.
Well, like I said, if you're a traditionalist, thats cool. But I was contrasting whether you want something to appreciate for its artistic sense as well, or just functionality. I have numerous rifles that have nice wood and steel, a few of which are gen-yoo-ine collector type pieces, at least to me. But when its deer season and its a raining and sleeting to beat all, I pick up my one synthetic rifle and head out. Don't want my fancy wood getting all soaked if I can avoid it.

The same can be said for pistols. I like my 1911's the best as overall "works of art", with their nice custom wood grips. I even carry one more than anything else under normal circumstances. But there again when I'm heading out to the woods and strapping on a backup in the inclement weather, one of my synthetics goes with me. Don't want my purty grips getting all soaked.

Depending on the application and criteria, sometimes synthetic is the way to go.
 

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love my ten II, just as accurate, just as reliable, have'nt had it long enough to say how it will last but I don't foresee any problems.
 
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