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Discussion Starter #1
Ok,
Call me FNG, Newbie, whatever but I got to ask this question !! I have a SA Loaded with blue finish and a Ruger 22/45 blued also. I am a beginner with handguns and I want to how who to clean them properly. What solvent, oil, the works. I am in the military and there we clean are weapons in solvent tanks in an outdoor environment with plently of air hoses around to dry things off. I will not have that for my personal weapons and will be doing this in my basement so I have to be thoughtful of that. Any help would be great.
 

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Others will likely give you additional insight, but here's my preferences...

I like MPro7 as a solvent/cleaner. It is non-toxic, and is soft on the hands. In addition, it doesn't smell too strongly, which may be important if you are married, have guests, etc.

As a lubricant, I must have most types of lubes, from Break Free CLP,FP-10, Tetra, Rem-Oil, Militec-1, Rig, Rig +P, Xcelleron, etc...

My favorite at the moment is Militec. It seems to work very well, and I like the idea that it is supposed to protect even after "burn-off".

Some people like to use grease on the slide/frame rails, and I've had good luck with the Rig grease, both the regular nd +P.

As far as my cleaning routine goes, it depends n how dirty/how long since the last cleaning...

A routine cleaning is using patches and MPro-7 to clean all parts, including slide, frame, outside of barrel, and all small parts. I'm lazy so barrel cleaning consists of 3-5 pulls of a bore-snake through the barrel. When the gun is clean and dry, I lube the slide an frame rails with Militec, and the inside of the top of the slide. I put a drop on the upper surfaces of the locking lugs, and wipe it down so there is not an excessive amount of oil. Upon reassembly, I lock the slide back and lube the outside of the barrel with a patch of Militec. I also wipe down the recoil spring with the oiled patch, and I put a light coating of oil on other areas subject to corrosion, but I almost totally wipe that off, so there is just a tiny film to prevent rust.

If the gun is really dirty, such as after shooting lead bullets, or before a big match, I will do a full cleaning. I don't know how to detil strip a frame, so the farthest I go is a field strip of the gun, then I remove the firing pin/extractor from the slide, and the safety from the frame.

First thing I do is spray all small parts, and the slide with MPro-7. I soak a patch and wipe down the frame, but I don't want to push gunk down into the action, so I'm a bit careful, and try to wipe "out" rather than "in" to the frame.

Then I wait a few minutes.

I then go at the parts that need it with a plastic toothbrush, then I hit the breechface and ejetion port area with a brass brush. The buildup is usually thick here, so I use the stronger brush for this area.

Then I take all this stuff, soaked with MPro-7 and brushed to loosen the buildup, outside, and I get out the "Crud-Cutter" (You could also use Bore-Scrubber, Break Free Powder Blast, or Carborator cleaner)

I use gloves and newspaper to soak up the residue, as this stuff is nasty--all full of chlorinated solvents and such... Anyway, I spray down all the parts, which removes most of the buildup, solvent, oil,grease, etc.

Then I wipe everything down with patches.

Here is where, depending on how dirty the gun is, I'll take the frame, remove the grips, and spray the heak out of it with the Crud Cutter. I let the grime flow outas I hold the frame upside-down and spray into the internals.

I do not spray the crud-cutter on the barrel, instead I clean the barrel using the bore snake if I've been using jacketed ammunition, or lead-removing brass patches if I use lead. Then I'll soak a patch in MPro-7 and coat the bore. I'll let this sit for a while during the rest of the cleaning procedure, then I'll use a copper brush and make about 20 passes. Then I'll put another soaked patch through, then a clean one. I repeat the soaked patch/clean patch procedure until the cean patch comes out clean. If there is still substantial "black" coming out on the patch, I'll soak the bore again and make another set of passes with the copper brush.

I almost forgot to mention that I clean out the firing pin and extractor channel with particular detail, as I feel that these are two areas where buildup can have particularly disastrous effects.


Now we have a gun that is clean and dry, but is now very subject to corrosion and is in need of proper lubrication for functioning.

I start with Rem-Oil. It is a very light, teflon impregnated oil, and I like to use it on the internals of the frame, and on small parts. I spray it, and then wipe down all of the oil I can get. This way, there is no heavy buildup of oil to attract crud, and the surface is coated with a light rust preventative and lubrcant.

Then I use Militech on the slide/frame rails and other parts as in the first part above.

Well, I hope this helps. My keyboard is being really wierd, so I'm sorry about the typo's.
 

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I think the best first reference for any 1911 owner is the "Wilson Combat 1911 Auto Maintenance Manual".

Everything you need to know, including complete dis- and re-assembly, diagnostics, cleaning, etc., is there.
www.wilsoncombat.com

Find the 800 number for sales at the site and order the booklet for $10+ + shipping.

This is the book to buy before Kuhnhausen.
 

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Mike, the "modern military" cleans weapons in vats and with airhoses?!! Things sure have changed from my Garand/1911/Thompson days when we used rods, patches and a hot shower, when you could find one. Go Army!
 

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I usually field strip my 1911's and clean/relube them after about 300-500rnds - sooner if they start getting me dirty


After about two of the above cleanings I will dunk clean. I made up a gallon of Ed's Red* sometime ago and I dunk/scrub my 1911's in it. I strip a little further by removing extractor and firing pin. I spend some time running the solution through the frame while moving the hammer to wash any crud away from the hammer/sear/spring area.

I never detail strip. I've never needed to.

I relube with BreakFree CLP or Tetra grease.


* 1 part each Acetone, mineral spirits, kerosene, Dextron ATF. I don't bother with the lanolin. You can leave out the acetone and your chemical bucket will last longer and the solution won't stink the area up as bad, but you'll have to scrub a bit more. The ATF is a pretty good lubricant.

------------------
Have a great day!
 

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I use a very fine abrasive cloth on the feed ramp of the frame and throat of the barrel to keep feeding surfaces slick, and a fine stone on the breech face for the same purpose.

The firing pin and extractor need to be removed and their receptacles cleaned from time to time.

A toothbrush dampened with Shooters' Choice gets the crud out of all the crevices, including down in the frame. Wipe the toothbrush regularly on your cleaning rag (cloth kitchen towels are best) to keep from spreading the crud into crevices instead of getting it out.

Other than that, I don't think it matters much how you clean as long as you do it. With the 1911, it is pretty obvious what needs to be cleaned when the piece is field stripped.

Many of us do not use lube at all, and find the 1911 works just fine without it. I do use Corrosion-X from time to time to prevent rust.
 

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The army doesn't use chemical vats too frequently. Probably depends on what kind of unit you are in. I have only used chemical vats to clean crew served weapons, like the M2 Bradley 25mm chain gun. That was only after a deployment while in Kuwait, and after training at NTC. Individual weapons always saw the patches, rods, and hot showers. Including lots of CLP.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
OK, now for a dumb question!! What do you mean by hot showers? You don't mean taking your piece with you to the old shower tent!!!
MIke
 

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Hot soap and water is the best way to remove the harmful residue from corrosive primers--which used to be the norm in military ammo.

Hot water is a scarce commodity in the military. If you have the luxury of a hot shower, you could use it to get yourself and your barrel clean.

Call it the "conservation of critical supplies."
 
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