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Discussion Starter #1
Just curious why this is bad for sear/trigger/etc. It really doesn't make a difference about what I see clerks/salespeople/whatever in the gun shops doing because I feel like I know more about guns than most of them do. I get tired of hearing people in shops, and well, everywhere call magazines "clips" and use improper terminology. If it's your job, you should be able to do it right and be knowledgeable about the product you're selling.

Every time I look at a gun with an exposed hammer and hand it back to the salesperson, he/she thumb drops the hammer.

I had a discussion with a guy working the gun counter who had the definition of a single action vs. double action backwards. Anyway, I'm digressing here..back to the point...

What's the problem with thumb dropping? I've heard dry firing is good for the gun, I've heard it's not...someone please explain.
 

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If you thumbdrop the hammer (on an empty chamber, always) with trigger pulled all the way to the rear, the sear should not touch the hammer at all.
so I don't see the problem there. As far as drive firing goes, I've seen many seasoned 1911 guys do this and apparently it's not horrible for the gun. If I'm going to practice my trigger pull, I always put a snap cap in. That's just my 2 cents.
 

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Of interest, sometimes the guy "behind the counter" knows more then most. Ask him what he bases his opinions on. He may surprise you.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
45collector said:
If you thumbdrop the hammer (on an empty chamber, always) with trigger pulled all the way to the rear, the sear should not touch the hammer at all.
so I don't see the problem there. As far as drive firing goes, I've seen many seasoned 1911 guys do this and apparently it's not horrible for the gun. If I'm going to practice my trigger pull, I always put a snap cap in. That's just my 2 cents.
I just get tired of hearing conflicting information all the time. You'd expect gun shop staff to be knowledgeable, but it's like fingernails on a chalkboard when these "experts" use the term clips for magazines and what not. Not knowing how a single action vs. double action gun works is just ludicrous for a person who works a job in the firearms industry...especially in sales.

I've heard dry firing is good for a new gun to help smooth out the action. I've heard that triggers can get better over time with use, whether it's through firing live ammunition or dry firing.

I just want to get good information that's correct and reliable.
 

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SHAFT said:
Of interest, sometimes the guy "behind the counter" knows more then most. Ask him what he bases his opinions on. He may surprise you.
Man, I've yet to find one. I hardly ever go to gunshops just because of all the BS spread throughout those establishments.

To answer the OP, no problem dropping the hammer. The problem is dropping the slide on an MT chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
SHAFT said:
Of interest, sometimes the guy "behind the counter" knows more then most. Ask him what he bases his opinions on. He may surprise you.
You mean the guy at bass pro who says he was military and says that a revolver requiring you to pull the trigger back to fire it is a double action because you have to do two actions to fire the gun where a revolver that allows you to pull the trigger which cocks and fires the gun is a single action because you only have to do one thing, pull the trigger, to fire the gun???
 

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Discussion Starter #7
BillD said:
Man, I've yet to find one. I hardly ever go to gunshops just because of all the BS spread throughout those establishments.

To answer the OP, no problem dropping the hammer. The problem is dropping the slide on an MT chamber.
I don't sling shot or use the slide release to let the slide fly forward on an empty chamber. I don't do that on my XD and I wasn't thrilled when my LEO cousin did do it.
 

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The problem with riding the hammer down with your thumb, rather than snapping, is that you will screw it up and either damage a finely adjusted hammer/sear engagement, or AD. It's not that it can't be done, or "shouldn't" be done in the sense that you will hurt something by the very act of lowering the hammer, but that nothing good comes from it. If the chamber is empty, snap the piece. If it's loaded, shoot, or apply the safety.
 

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Whenever I lower the hammer to "decock" one of my 1911's I ALWAYS do it with BOTH hands, and I always keep a finger UNDER the hammer as long as I can. Mainly because I'm just paranoid of an accidental discharge with a .45.

My right thumb doesn't work well enough to try and do it one-handed. Besides, you have to grip the gun hard enough to disengage the grip safety, and that makes it even harder and riskier to do it one-handed.

I also always make sure I know the muzzle is pointed is a safe direction.
 

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rondawg said:
Whenever I lower the hammer to "decock" one of my 1911's I ALWAYS do it with BOTH hands, and I always keep a finger UNDER the hammer as long as I can. Mainly because I'm just paranoid of an accidental discharge with a .45.
Surely you are not lowering the hammer on a loaded chamber. That is very dangerous and totally unneccessary.
 

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eljay45 said:
Surely you are not lowering the hammer on a loaded chamber. That is very dangerous and totally unneccessary.
Of course it's dangerous! That's why I use both hands, and keep a finger under the hammer. I won't argue about the "totally unnecessary" part, that's too subjective because, at times, it IS necessary.
 

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eljay45 said:
Please explain.
No thanks, not going to get into it. Perhaps in YOUR world it's "totally unnecessary", but in mine it occasionally is. Just accept that and stop trying to argue with me about it. I do it as safely as possible. I can't believe you refuse to accept that a 1911 may occasionally need to be decocked from Con 1 down into Con 2. It happens, get over it.
 

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Must be a Hoosier thing, it's totally unnecessary in my world too.
 

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In days of yor, carring the 1911 with the hammer down on a loaded chamber was more common then most think. Then again, in days of yor, the revolver was perferd over the 1911 more often then not. I'm not saying it is right. In this day and age, either my chamber is empty or it is con 1. If you have some crazy "requierments" try not to shoot yourself.

All guys behinde the counter are not created equal. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Now that I have a clarification, thanks for the input. I'll just dry fire it. I guess I need to invest in some snap caps. Both pistols I have are .45 acp so I won't need to buy multiple calibers.
 

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Jerry Kuhnhausen in his Vol. 1 "THE COLT .45 AUTOMATIC" on page 11

RULE#12. LIMIT .45 auto dry firing - no matter who says it's O.K.

I take his word for most things about the 1911. I have the impression too much (whatever that is) dry firing can risk :

1. Enlarging the opening the firing pin strikes through and it's possible for the firing pin to get stuck there and either not chamber a round or get a possible slam fire.

2. Bending the firing pin with same above results.

At any rate, I take his word for it and use snap caps for dry firing - otherwise gently ease the hammer down on an EMPTY chamber USING BOTH HANDS AS DESCRIBED.

YMMV

:rolleyes:
 

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About the only time I lower the hammer by hand is when fondling a gun at a shop. They are going to lower the hammer anyway so I just save them the bother. On a rare occasion, I will lower the hammer on one of my 1911`s, but only with mag dropped clear and an empty chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I planned on snap caps. I've heard that people with reloading equipment can make their own "snap" caps by seating a bullet properly in a case without a charge or a primer. Instead of a primer, using a small piece or round rubber like the end of an eraser from a pencil. Use a knife/razor to shave it down to be flush or slight sunk below the rear of the case. I guess for .45 auto, their not expensive, but for some obscure cartridge, it might be worth while over ordering them.
 
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