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Im still researching for my first 1911. Ive been told that most 1911 manufacturers throat and polish the chambers to allow the user to reliably feed other than ball ammo. However, they do so at the expense of chamber support. Think about the Glock bbl and the infamous "Glock Smiles".

Im wondering to what extent the avg mid range 1911 (SA loaded or better) has sacraficed chamber support?

For those of you that reload, are you able to experiment with increased pressure loads without getting the 1911 equivalent of a "Glock smile"?
 

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It depends on the actual pistol. Colt for example now uses a special "dimpled" feed ramp that provides adequate support while providing reliability for all types of ammo. Other manufacturers use a conventional throated barrel, but some do it without cutting the throat too deep and compromising chamber support. Most issues with "overthoated" barrels tend to arise from ones that were altered by an incompetent gunsmith who overcut the throat.
 

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Also, keep in mind that the 45acp is fairly low-pressure, while 9mm and especially 40 S&W are much higher pressure. And 40's are where most of the Glock "smiles" are found.

I do have some experience (unfortunately) with blowing out a 45acp case, inadvertently, by one of my handloads with an (unintended) double charge of Clays. But, for normal 45acp loads, and even the top end book loads, the case head is supported well enough to prevent blow-outs.
 

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For those of you that reload, are you able to experiment with increased pressure loads without getting the 1911 equivalent of a "Glock smile"?
The key to avoiding these problems is to keep the pressures reasonable.

Don’t try and make the .45ACP a .45 Super
If your going to run over 21,000 p.s.i. use a rated case.
If you do load (+P) ammunition use a case rated for the load and keep the pressure at or below 23,000 p.s.i. and in the overwhelming number of guns things will be fine.

Chambers and throats are like fingerprints; no two are exactly the same.
Work up loads that are safe in your guns.
Good Luck
 

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It depends on the actual pistol. Colt for example now uses a special "dimpled" feed ramp that provides adequate support while providing reliability for all types of ammo.
I'm a big believer in the "dimpled" feed ramp. Works for me and my brass is none the worse for being fired in a chamber with such a "dimple"

Then I read Patrick Sweeney in his book on 1911's argue that the "dimpled" feed ramp reduces the support needed for the case. He says you can get reliable feeding without throating the chamber if you use a barrel with integral ramp.

But integral feed ramp is a curse word on this forum.:scratch:

What's the bottom line here?
 

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Colt for example now uses a special "dimpled" feed ramp that provides adequate support while providing reliability for all types of ammo.
I have observed that the center "dimple" in many Colt barrels is deeper and therefore provides LESS case support than conventional methods. A few I've seen are scary deep. :eek:

Common sense is handier than powder at a reloading bench.
:)
 

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I also found that using quite a bit of taper crimp made guns with minimal throating feed great.

One of the things I picked up from other match shooters when I joined my action league was to take the barrel out of my gun, and test drop each round into the chamber- any hesitation and that round was discarded. You can pretty quickly go through 1-200 rounds and save yourself some potential trouble.
 

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Follow standard reloading guidelines and you won't need to worry about it.

The only isses I've seen was where people deviate from manufactures recommended loads. I've been reloading for years and have had no issues at all with any of my 1911's.
 

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Follow standard reloading guidelines and you won't need to worry about it.

The only isses I've seen was where people deviate from manufactures recommended loads. I've been reloading for years and have had no issues at all with any of my 1911's.
+1
 

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"If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

If you are not having problems, don't mess with it. If you think you are having problems, check with someone else - or - a good gun smith. The days when the "factory" gun needed improvement (in most cases) are long past. Most major manufacturers now have features on a lot of their models that were "custom" features just a (seemingly) few years ago.

Think about it, how much did you pay for a 1911 without features fifty years ago and what do you pay now for the "standard" production model? A long way from a little of that difference is from the "tuned" gun becoming a factory normal production item.
 

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I have observed that the center "dimple" in many Colt barrels is deeper and therefore provides LESS case support than conventional methods. A few I've seen are scary deep. :eek:

Common sense is handier than powder at a reloading bench.
:)
I have 4 dimple throated Colts, even with +P, I have not seen the brass expand into the dimple. It is far enough back on the case web that if you have a big enough problem to see any issues in that area, the dimple is the last of your worries.

99% of the issues I have seen have been from double charges, not hot rounds.
 

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up the ramp; makin Major

My SA 9x19 1911 is un-ramped; my SA 40 S&W 1911 is ramped; my SA 45 ACP 1911 is un-ramped.

The only ammo I shoot is from my factory.

What was the question?

(Answer: buy a Nowlin barrel and get the chamber cut as you wish...)
 

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If it's important to you then check the pistol before you buy it.

If I wanted a pistol to shoot overpressure loads in .45 Auto +P+ I'd buy an H&K or a revolver

I'd stongly suggest that, for those who are concerned about it, trying a case in the barrel before buying the pistol will answer the question of how much support that particular barrel offers much better than asking people who can't see the pistol from where they are.

I've never had the problem - but by far most (given that I've loaded tens of thousands maybe hundreds of thousands of target loads and negligible numbers of anything else in .45 Auto) of my loads are 3.5 grains of Bullseye for gallery use and the 50 yard loads are not only not excessive they are a long way from beginning to think about approaching excessive.

For carry and high performance I tend to use factory loads - I've been known to carry ball. Currently I like Winchester for carry. I find CorBon good for high performance but there are some who don't like CorBon and prefer others.

I like a strong case - and an ejector that fills the slot and if I saw guppy cases I'd use some beefy grip panels as well - my carry gun is a 9X23 with a ramped barrel but I'd be just as happy with a conventional barrel given that once again I carry factory loads.

I could use .45 Super brass even for .45 Auto +P if I went that way and I have several hundred Rowland cases for a Rowland conversion that I could cut down if I wanted a project easier than buying .45 Win Mag cases or trimming and reaming rifle cases ( or looking for Detonics cases or.....).

In sum I'd say not really a problem generally but I'd look at the specific barrel and then use known strong cases such as the Starline .45 Super case.
 

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My S&W 1911 has the stock .45 barrel and feeds everything FMJ, JHP and LEadhead 200 gr. SWC except for one lot of Rem 185 gr. JHPs
that I also had issues with in my 625. I use WIlson Combat ETM mags.
 

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I do have some experience (unfortunately) with blowing out a 45acp case, inadvertently, by one of my handloads with an (unintended) double charge of Clays. But, for normal 45acp loads, and even the top end book loads, the case head is supported well enough to prevent blow-outs.
I have an idea of what may have happened at that time.
When the round fired, you probably felt that your fingers had been blown off, and dropped the pistol onto the ground. When you were examining your hand to seen how many fingers were left, you were amazed that they did not even have a scratch. Then you began to feel something wet on your face. Looking in the mirror of your pickup truck, you find that your face is bleeding where it has been filled with tiny pieces of shrapnel, making you glad you had your glasses on. Examining your gun, you find that both grip panels have been split in half and the magazine has been expelled from the gun. You probably were surprised to find the empty round still chambered, and thought to yourself you were glad it was the last round in the magazine.

I am sure that was what happened.

Bullseye shooters do it with one hand
 

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I have an idea of what may have happened at that time.
When the round fired, you probably felt that your fingers had been blown off, and dropped the pistol onto the ground. When you were examining your hand to seen how many fingers were left, you were amazed that they did not even have a scratch. Then you began to feel something wet on your face. Looking in the mirror of your pickup truck, you find that your face is bleeding where it has been filled with tiny pieces of shrapnel, making you glad you had your glasses on. Examining your gun, you find that both grip panels have been split in half and the magazine has been expelled from the gun. You probably were surprised to find the empty round still chambered, and thought to yourself you were glad it was the last round in the magazine.

I am sure that was what happened.

Bullseye shooters do it with one hand
:D :D Gee, I wonder how you could describe what happened so closely. :D
 

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I have reloaded for all my 1911's for about 12 years. All except one have traditional barrels. One has a ramped barrel. I reload everything from powder-puff 185gr bullseye loads to full-power hardball loads and have never had a problem with bulged brass. I keep pressures well within normal-pressure specs.
 

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Forgive me for this dumb question,but what does a Glock Smile look like?
 

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Thanks Gerk! That answered my question..
 
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