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Has the value of them really doubled, or has it pretty much stayed the same?

It's easy to say I bought one for 600 bucks and it's now worth 12. What is that 1200 worth in 1998 dollars?

600 bucks spent in January 1998 would be about 908.00 today.


So yes, I would shoot the crap out of it and not feel bad.
I agree with this logic FWIW. I paid $550.00 for mine new. To buy another firearm of "like" quality today, would cost roughly $1200.00 ...say a Dan Wesson or something. So, the "collector" appeal really isn't putting a premium on it. That is just how much a gun of that quality costs today.
 

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I have a couple of Clack shooters, wonderful guns indeed. That is why I became a fan. But they were only made one year. How many unfired ones are there in existence? I have two. So yes, they remain unfired. This is an historic gun. It paved the way for every other 1911 manufacturer to rethink the old GI style from the factory.
 

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What is this referring to ?
All Kimber pistols have been made in Yonkers, NY. When they started building pistols they had their corporate head in Clackamas, OR. Hence the early guns marked as such.

There is a perceived notion that Kimbers with that roll mark are better than the guns they make today. Not to mention that they weren't marked that for long, and that makes them slightly rare. There is also the notion that all pre series II guns are also better.
 

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This is an interesting question. Just like limited edition edition cars or motorcycles. A lot of the new Ford GTs will be bought by collectors and stored for future drivers and large financial rewards. Yeah I know, Ford is trying to stop that but...

I bought a 1982 Honda CBX 6 cylinder motorcycle WITH 2.1 miles on the odometer, in 1991 for more than the MSRP. In 2006 I sold it for a bit more than double my investment. http://www.myruffhouse.com/1982_CBX.htm

In my opinion, guns, cars, & motorcycles are made to be used as intended. It comes own to each owner, and the advantages to using it or keeping it for a future owner. If you're going to use it, use as intended, if you're going to save it, preserve it as best as you can.
 

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I buy first year issue pistols all the time and store them away so I can sell them fifty years from now as unfired fired originals. My great grandkids might appreciate it if the government doesn’t get them first . 😁😁
 

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That Clackamas Kimber doubled in price? ......LOL, 25 years? That's less than a EE US savings bond rate.

One share of Microsoft at $25, or an $18 share of Amazon would be worth thousands of percent more. It's not an investment, it's actually losing money each year. Shoot it, or else your grandkids will drop it off at a gun show someday and nobody in your family would have ever enjoyed the pleasure of it. Safe queen, what a waste.
 

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What is the difference between a "Clackamas" Kimber and a modern Kimber, as long it has an internal extractor? I can't imagine we're comparing these to different generations of collectible Colts. They all have the same MIM parts, right? And the early parts may not have been as good in their MIM infancy as the later ones?
 

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I was just re-reading my post, and it looks abrasive. It's not my intent to drive people away from the discussion. I don't want to have the last word on this...I certainly don't deserve to :)

I just don't understand the fascination. They used to be made in one place, and now they're made in another. They have made missteps along the way with external extractors and Schwartz grip safeties and all that.

The only Kimber I have was made in 2004, and it's been brilliant. I love it. I did replace most of the small parts...not because I needed to, but because I'm a fanatic. But I kept the the extractor and ejector, and they've both been perfect.

The newest Kimber I've shot is a 2012 or 2013 "Officer's" sized compact that my cousin bought. I don't like compact 1911s, and I don't like 1911s with aluminum frames, and it's both. And it shot 100% through the few hundred rounds we fed it. It was surprisingly accurate, too.

With the improvements in MIM part production over the years, I can only imagine that Kimber is probably making the best pistols they've ever made right now. But I could also easily be wrong. You tell me.
 
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