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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've heard that Springfield Mil-Specs tend to be rather boxy with sharp edges, and that it is a good idea to have it dehorned. A few questions:

1. How exactly is this done?

2. What about the parkerized finish; how will it be affected?

3. And about how much does it cost to have this done?

Thanks.
 

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Too bad your gun wasn't stainless steel or you could do it yourself. Re-finishing your parkerizing is going to be the biggest expense.

De-horning is simply rounding off all the sharp edges and right angles on the gun, specifically the slide. Files, stones, Dremels can all be used.

I would think that $50.00 - $70.00 should cover de-horning, NOT including re-finishing of the gun.
 

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Shane is right on. The term I like is "Carry Bevel" Dehorning is a dumb gunwiter term. This is usually done while building the gun, not as a thing in and of itself. Kimber's come this way. I would not bother with a parkerized GI 1911.It is done in various ways from the "Clark Beltsander" approach to the exquisite Pistolwrench type which is very well done and similar to what I so. We simply remover all sharp edges from the pistol before we finish it. To do a parkerized 1911 and restore the finish would be in the $200.00 price range. A real waste of money in my opinion.
 

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I first heard the term "dehorning" used to describe a gentle breaking of a pistol's sharp edges from Jeff Cooper. Gun writer?...yes. Dumb?...not hardly.

The term "carry bevel" was coined by Wayne Novak and might even be trademarked by him.

Other terms, such as "melting" (usually a heavy dehorning), "smooth out", and so forth, have their own problems in terms of expressing the work done. Consequently, I think that the term "dehorning" works as well as any...even though it can be confused with removing a revolver's hammer spur.

As to whether or not it's "worth it", I suppose this depends on the user and the anticipated role of the pistol. A pistol that lives in a box or which is carried to and from the range in a gun rug probably doesn't need it. A pistol that will be holstered and used for defense/practical shooting benefits from being devoid of sharp edges. The user's holsters, coat linings, and hands will avoid some nasty scrapes by so doing.

Careful work with a file and/or stone can break the the most troublesome edges (the muzzle end of the slide, the leading edge of the slide stop, etc.) without disrupting very much finish. The bright spots can be touched up with a little cold blue and the result can be quite acceptable.

Rosco
 

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I can't speak for the SA Mil-Spec, but I have a SA Champion 2001 Loaded Parkerized that has no sharp edges. SA seems to have taken care of that problem.
 

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Rosco,
Of all the good folks that contribute here, I appreciate your posts, the most!
You have a unique blend of knowledge and common sense.
Someday, I hope we will meet.

Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Re-finishing your parkerizing is going to be the biggest expense.
That's what I was afraid of. Thanks for the info guys.

As for using the term "dehorning": sorry, I am NOT a gunsmith, so all of this terminology is new to me.
 

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Rosco: Jeff Cooper is a gun writer and I'm very familar with what he does.He is also many other things and he's my last living hero. The post did not say that this person even owned such a gun nor did he say what it's intended use was.If you think that it's worth it , for some unknown purpose, then who am I to disagree. I bow to your superior intellect.
 

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Grrrrrrrrr!

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Nothing like the smell of Breakfree to make my day complete.
 

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Originally posted by Dave Sample:
Rosco: If you think that it's worth it , for some unknown purpose, then who am I to disagree. I bow to your superior intellect.
There's no reason for anyone to be bowing to anyone else here. I just shared what I knew about the origins of the term "dehorning", opined that there weren't a lot of alternative terms that were any better, and shared the circumstances under which I think it's "worth it". No offense intended.

I share your high opinion of Jeff Cooper.

Rosco
 
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