1911Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,033 Posts
This one just closed on Auction Arms and did not meet he reserve...

This NAVY just closed at $5110 without meeting its reserve. It is an original NAVY where the one on Gunbroker had at least a wrong (later) hammer and bogus barrel. http://www.auctionarms.com/Search/DisplayItem.cfm?ItemNum=6955332
I just welcomed back to the fold a Navy pistol that I regretted having to part with. (Serial 3218) There is not much finish on her and she has had her barrel replaced, but there is still a lot of life left in the old girl. Other than her barrel, she is all original including the transition mag catch that was used from about serial number 3190 to about 7500. There are more pictures at www.coolgunsite.com Best Karl
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,685 Posts
I've mentioned it before, but for the sake of your optimism, I'll reitereate;

about 4 years ago or so, I saw a beautiful, re-blued, Navy-marked Colt, the guy was selling it for $850.

Maybe something like that would satisfy you until you find a better, original-finish one, that you can afford?

Keep looking, and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
There was one on Auction Arms that has not got any bids during two consecutive auctions. It has a 1918 Army frame and the pictures suck. What would be a fair price for one like that? Is it risky to shoot any of the old 45's?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
602 Posts
jimcruiser03 said:
There was one on Auction Arms that has not got any bids during two consecutive auctions. It has a 1918 Army frame and the pictures suck. What would be a fair price for one like that? Is it risky to shoot any of the old 45's?
Risky is probably to strong a word. Cracking was a problem with the early slides, so one of the fixes was to increase the radius of the front and rear of the ejection port. Colt began to harden the front of the slides of the Govt. Models in the 1920's if memory serves, and the M1911A1's when military production resumed in 1937. They began to harden the area around the slide stop notch in about 1943 or 1944, I think....

So, 1911 slides are more prone to cracking than the later versions....

The slide in the photos has a horizontal "H" on the back of the slide which identifies it as a very early slide...
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top