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What is the general opinion about using one of the after market recoil spring guides. I have heard different thoughts about just going with the stock set-up or installing the guides.
 

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All 1911's have recoil spring guides, it is just that some of them are short, just like JMB designed them. The question will, perhaps, result in a long thread debating the "util" of FLGRs but I'll keep my thoughts to myself (beyond my opening sentence).


If I have not welcomed you before, Howdy DFS.


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DFS, I use a full lenght guide rod in my PARA P14(IPSC) gun but use the stock(short) guide rod in my Springfield(home defense) gun. I think the added weight is a plus for my para but it does'nt make my springfield work any better. my two cents.
 

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Glad to here that Silver Surfer. I'm going to replace the 2 piece guide rod with the short and new plunger on my SA 45. The idea of having to keep track of an allen wrench to break the gun down can be a pain.
 

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There is one HUGE advantage of using the full-length guide rod in a 1911: you can drill a 1/16" take-down hole in the rod and remove (and replace) the spring and rod as a captive assembly using a simple bent wire tool. You can also throw away your barrel bushing wrench since you will never need it again. STI uses this on the Trojan model and it makes cleaning your gun so much easier..... when I got my new Para the first thing I did was drill that hole (life is too short to do things the hard way).
 

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Originally posted by bountyhunter:
There is one HUGE advantage of using the full-length guide rod in a 1911: you can drill a 1/16" take-down hole in the rod and remove (and replace) the spring and rod as a captive assembly using a simple bent wire tool. You can also throw away your barrel bushing wrench since you will never need it again. STI uses this on the Trojan model and it makes cleaning your gun so much easier..... when I got my new Para the first thing I did was drill that hole (life is too short to do things the hard way).
Wouldn't it be even easier to just rotate the barrel bushing, remove the spring plug, and then trade out recoil springs? That way you don't have to have a guide rod for every weight recoil spring. After all life is too short to do things the hard way
. Unless you get rid of the bushing altogether and utilize a bushingless bull barrel a bushing wrench may still be a necessity.
 

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Originally posted by bountyhunter:
There is one HUGE advantage of using the full-length guide rod in a 1911: you can drill a 1/16" take-down hole in the rod and remove (and replace) the spring and rod as a captive assembly using a simple bent wire tool. You can also throw away your barrel bushing wrench since you will never need it again. STI uses this on the Trojan model and it makes cleaning your gun so much easier..... when I got my new Para the first thing I did was drill that hole (life is too short to do things the hard way).
Sorry about the double post, I am new here.
I have a couple with full rods, and a couple normal ones. I see no difference in performance.
My STI Edge requires the itty bitty pin for disassembly, and I find it to be a major pain in the rear.
 

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Welcome aboard new guys and the only thing that the full length guide does is make the disassembly of the weapon much more difficult. Some folks maintain that it keeps the recoil spring from kinking, but I personally don't think that they're needed. If they'd been necessary, JMB would have added one to his way back when. :D

7th
 
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