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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Springfield LW Compact (commander sized). an older one with the cone style bushing that screws onto the barrel. It also has a full length guide rod, with the reverse style plug. Recoil springs for a Commander are too long for the gun, I trimmed one last night so that it would just allow the slide to go all the way to the rear under recoil, it just stops the slide before it would hit the frame. I compared the distance with the same gun with the recoil spring removed for reference. I have no idea if this is correct, but it does make some sense to do it this way. The slide stop functions normally, and I compared the slide travel to that of my Colt, and it seems about the same. Did I do this right or am I missing something? I didn't cut to the same length of the old one because I felt the spring that was in it (non-original) was too short, I saw some light battering of the frame where the guide rod sits, and figured we had too much slide velocity. This approach should work, but is it correct? :confused: ==Bob
 

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Bob,

During recoil, slide must travel all the way to the rear. Slide's recoil spring tunnel must impact on recoil spring head. If you see to much slide to frame battering, you will need to step-up on a spring weight. Some folks are using "shock-buffs", but they should be avoided in a 4" and shorter guns for reliability reasons. Anyway, you will need to trim your spring more and check it's weight afterwords.
 

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pourboy said:
it just stops the slide before it would hit the frame
You are not doing this properly. Are you saying that the compressed spring is stopping the rearward travel of the slide? If so, you are asking for trouble.

Remove the spring, but leave the guide rod in place. Put the slide back on the frame - less the spring. Push the slide to the rear as far as it will go. Mark a witness line on the slide to indicate where the front of the dust cover of the frame is relative to the slide, when the slide is fully rearward.

Now put the spring in. Do the same test. If the slide is not moving back AT LEAST AS FAR as it did with no spring, you have coil bind (or spring stacking). This is bad. Clip 1/2 a coil at a time of until your witness marks are the same (spring in vs. no spring). Then clip 1 more coil to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
shane45-1911 said:
If the slide is not moving back AT LEAST AS FAR as it did with no spring, you have coil bind (or spring stacking). This is bad. Clip 1/2 a coil at a time of until your witness marks are the same (spring in vs. no spring). Then clip 1 more coil to be safe.
That's the point I was trying to get at. Should the slide be stopped by the recoil spring, or be stopped by contact with the frame. I'm only one coil off that point right now, by was unsure of how far to go with this. By the way, I'm using a 20 lb. spring with no buffer. I also have a 22 lb spring for it, would that be better for the alloy frame, assuming the gun functions okay with it?

Thank you for the information.
Bob
 

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Right - the slide should be stopped by the frame - or more specifically the guide rod head.

22# is a bit of overkill for a commander length gun. Stick with the factory spec (18#) or go to the 20# spring if your pistol runs well with it. All my commanders run best with 20# springs with my ammo choice (and they all have shock buffs).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
shane45-1911 said:
All my commanders run best with 20# springs with my ammo choice (and they all have shock buffs).
Really? We've been conditioned from birth that shock buffs are evil, and especially so for Commanders. I'm going to try it with a 20# spring for the time being.

Thanks again,
Bob
 
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