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Discussion Starter #1
I think everyone would agree that you should have the heaviest recoil spring possible in a 1911, providing that it will function properly. The heavier the spring, the less slide to frame battering there is.

With that in mind, here is my confusion. I have a 15 lb recoil spring in my Colt M1911A1 70 series bullseye pistol, ramped Kart barrel. My reloads are 4.0 grains of Tite Group under a 200 grain LSWC bullet. Alibis are very rare with this load. The empty brass lands about 3 to 4 feet from the pistol, shock buff lasts longer than most, so I’d say my set-up is about right. The other day I decided to shoot some of my bullseye loads in my hardball pistol. It is a pre-70 series Colt with a 18.5 lb recoil spring, non-ramped Kart barrel. The light bullseye loads functioned flawlessly in my hardball pistol. (much to my amazement).

Should I try a heavier spring in my bullseye pistol? Like a 16 or 17 lb?


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The only way you'll know is if you try them. If they work, great, if not, back off on the recoil spring weight until they do.

PS - I agree with using the heaviest recoil spring that still allows proper feeding and ejection - but there is this other camp across the river...............bunch of savages.....





[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 06-29-2001).]
 

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I do not agree that a shooter should use the heaviest possible spring that allows good function. You should use the "proper" spring. For hardball-equivalent loads, that's a 16-18 pounder in a 5" .45. Heavier-than-normal springs can introduce feeding problems, as they ruin the timing of the gun's cycle. A heavy spring can also allow a little thumb pressure on the slide (when using a high-thumb grip) to cause a malfunction. If the gun will run better with a little heavier spring, then give it a try. The slide and frame of a 1911 should not be battered by normal-pressure loads; such a problem would have shown up in almost 90 years of combat service.
 

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I run across this a lot..

My gun runs great! Never bobbles, accurate, shoots everytime, brass lands in a neat little pile, parts last a long time...

...SO I THINK I'LL START CHANGING STUFF AROUND NOW!!!

...good luck...

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Discussion Starter #5
gyp_c

I understand exactly what you mean, but changing a recoil spring is easily reversible.

I am going to try a 16 lb one. Probably should have tried it without even asking but I found it curious that it would still work with a 3.5 lb heavier spring.

Mainly I was interested if anyone else had experienced this.

Thanks

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no problem...how old are the springs in those pistols?

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Discussion Starter #7
The Bullseye pistol (15 lb Wolff) has about 1200 rounds, and the hardball pistol (18.5 lb Nowlin) has about 400 rounds.

Beats me how it worked? I'm not complaining though. I can use my hardball pistol as a back-up.


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[This message has been edited by Baer1911 (edited 07-01-2001).]
 
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