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Discussion Starter #1
As much as I have been shooting recently, I was interested in doing my own loads.. Can anyone suggest a good book or video to start with. Hopefully instructional and will help me determine what type of equipment I need....

Also if anyone does this and has a general price range of what kind of capital I need, that would be great..

As always you guys OWN!!!!!!!! :rock:
 

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A couple of suggestions:

The Hornady reloading manual is a wealth of information. Available at most bigger bookstores, gun shows, or I would imagine thru Hornady's website.

Also check out www.dillonprecision.com for equipment. Dillon is pricey, but excellent and offers a lifetime no questions asked warranty on their presses and most accessories. Excellent customer service and resale when you want to upgrade. Also easy to switch calibers on their presses. I've had two other brands and loaded on yet another. Dillon is the one you'll end up with; might as well start with Dillon.

Good shooting!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Awsome thanks :)
 

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From $200 on up to maybe $750 is what you should plan on spending.

Dillon is the name brand, and priced accordingly. Redding is next highest. Lee is the cheapest. Hornady, RCBS and Lyman are sort of grouped in the middle. I have a little of every brand except Dillon (well, I guess my dial caliper is a Dillon.)

I got started for less than $250 total, including components. Start saving brass, so you don't have to buy it. Keep an eye out for sales, check the auctions, ebay, auctionarms.com, gunbroker.com and gunsamerica.com all have reloading presses, dies, and components for less than the local gunshop.
 

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The Speer #13 Reloading Manual has a lot of information about safety, powder, equipment, procedures etc. in addition to recipes for various rounds for rifle, pistol, and revolver. It's a good reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Awsome, cause I know its really dangerous, and I definately want to go over the material throughly before I even purchase the equipment.

Unless I find a killer deal hehehe ;) :)
 

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Natural:

Buy a manual first, I like the Speer. You will get the answers to most of your questions on equipment, and cost. If you decide not to go into reloading (unlikely) you are only out the cost of the manual. If you go into it you will need the manual anyway.
 

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I learned by reading the Speer manual. I still have all my body parts.

If you buy a cheap (sorry, inexpensive) press, you might be able to start for between $200 and $250. Some tips:
- Lee dies are about the cheapest around, but they're also among the best. For handgun calibers, their four-die carbide set is the easiest to set up and turns out the best ammunition.
- Don't skimp on the scale. It's an important safety check. A mechanical one is fine, but count on spending $50 to $75 for a decent one.
- If you're only loading handgun rounds, the RCBS Little Dandy powder measure is a lot less expensive than a screw-adjustable powder measure--and a lot faster to use.
- Wear safety glasses, always.
 

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Ditto on all of the above. May I add a couple of suggestions?

1. Buy yourself a good, sturdy single stage press first. This will acquaint you with all the steps of reloading. Plus, when you move to a progressive (and you will, trust me) you'll have a dedicated press for precision loading.

2. Second the part about getting a good scale. The best buy I've seen is the RCBS 10-10. I absolutely love that scale!!

3. Lee dies are excellent dies. I load almost all my calibers on Lee dies, including those for semi-auto match rifles. I have no complaints, whatsoever! Plus, the decapper pin will slide back into the die if you hit an obstruction. Worth their weight in gold.

4. As an alternative to the single stage press, consider a good turret press, such as the Lyman or the new one from RCBS. You can set up for two calibers in the same turret.
 

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The first manual a read was the Lyman handgun-reloading manual. It scared the crap out of me and I wasn’t sure about reloading. Then I read the Lee manual and it took some of the edge off. Since then I’ve reloaded about 20,000 45 acp rounds without any problems. (knock on wood)
 

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NaturalS:

Reloading is not dangerous, stupidity is, carelessness is, not paying attention is. More reloaders will die running to the store to buy primers or powder in their cars than will be hurt reloading, if they pay attention and follow the simple rules.
 

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The manuals are certainly good to read. The best and quickest way is to find someone already experienced in reloading. Have them walk you through the process. Most shooters I know would be happy to help a new reloader.
If you are going to shoot a lot get a Dillon 550. A single stage is good to learn on, but 100 rds. per hour is pretty much max.
 

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One little rule of thumb may help you with load selection here. Don't buy just one loading manual. You'll find you'll favor one powder manufacturer over others for some reason or other, usually price or availability. Get that manufacturers reloading manual. Powder manufacturers pressure test all of the data they publish. This is the safest data available. Also, follow their recommendations exactly until you're familiar with what you're doing. Reloading is interesting, a lot of fun, and very simple to do, you'll enjoy it a lot. ==bob
 
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