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Hi Folks,

Maby this is not a new question...
Finally I am a proud owner of a colt combat commander series 80 in 9mm luger cliber. Due to increasing ammonition price I am thinking about reloading.

I am a totally newbie in reloading... but pressure, and case length should work for my combat commander, FN high power and Glock 17.
So in simple words one solution for all thre pistols, without damaging one of those.
I don´t want to get any damages on my Colt, because spare parts in Europe are really hard to find...but I love shooting this beauty

Any suggestions?
 

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There's gonna be many 9mm loads that'll work in all three pistols. You'll have to work up some loads for the most finicky pistol and tune the loads so they'll work in all three guns.

I run my 9mm loads in my STI Trojan ,S&W shield and my XDM 4.5"

Good luck
 

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Stick with 124grain bullets-FMJ
good powders to try are 231, VVn320, or unique
primers-whatever is cheapest in your area
 

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I used the same press for my pistols as my rifles. 9mm or .357 Magnum or .38 Special are similar to reload. I used Lee carbide dies in a RCBS press and it worked well.

Develop an optimum load for your 9mm is a trial and error process.

Go to Handloader Magazine for great info.
 

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Check the powder company web sites (Hodgdon/IMR/Winchester/VV/AA/etc) for recommended loads. Stick to 124 gr bullets. Hodgdon HP-38/Win 231 (exact same powder according to Hodgdon web site) is a favorite.

You will not hurt the Commander with any sane load, and probably not with any thing that will fit in the case and seat a bullet unless you are really working hard at it, like with powder from a blank (DO NOT DO THAT!!), or something equally stupid.

Use carbide dies (I like Lee four die sets with the Lee Factory Crimp Die) and have fun.
 

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He's in Europe.


Welcome to the 1911Forum, Screamager! And welcome to Reloading Bench!


You will find that gunpowder and bullet manufacturers publish load data
for various cartridges and bullet weights, using their powders.
That's what you want. Manufacturers' published reloading data.
Some is printed in books, some is available online.

Nearly every load published by those manufacturers will work in your 3 pistols.
Stick with manufacturers' load data and you will always be safe.


First, find the books on reloading that are common in Europe.
Printed here in USA are excellent books by Sierra Bullets,
Speer Bullets, Hornady, Lyman, and others. But you'll have to check
to see what is available in Europe. Norma, Lapua, and others
probably have excellent books available. In those books you read
all about reloading until you understand the process, and the safety protocol.
Don't buy anything until you understand what you're going to do.


Then shop around for your reloading equipment (press, dies, powder measure, scale, etc)
and collect all the data manuals and manufacturers load data available to you.
Build up a library of current reloading data from the manufacturers.
That library will give you the data you need.

When you're ready to start, you check all the load data in your library
and compare the information to the bullets and powder you can buy.
Not all bullets and powder are available all the time, you'll have to shop and see.
Once you have powder, bullets, and primers that fit the load data
you start at Starting Load and work up carefully and slowly
in all three of your pistols, until you find the load that suits them all best.
Do not exceed Maximum Load listed in the load data.
 

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You should have no problem loading for any of your 9MMs. Type of bullet and weight are personal preferences but the most common are 115 gr and 124 gr. I use a 115 gr FMJ for my Kimber and Glock.
 

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Hi Folks,

Maby this is not a new question...
Finally I am a proud owner of a colt combat commander series 80 in 9mm luger cliber. Due to increasing ammonition price I am thinking about reloading.

I am a totally newbie in reloading... but pressure, and case length should work for my combat commander, FN high power and Glock 17.
So in simple words one solution for all thre pistols, without damaging one of those.
I don´t want to get any damages on my Colt, because spare parts in Europe are really hard to find...but I love shooting this beauty

Any suggestions?
First, Welcome to the Forum

You shouldn’t need to be overly concerned regarding “harm” to your Colt pistol.
Millions of Handloaders have safely loaded for Colt pistols like yours for decades without bringing unusual harm to the guns.
Colt steel is still a benchmark in quality and if you have a more recent production Colt, these are some of the best made Colt pistols since the 50’s and 60’s era production guns.

As far as parts go, there are thousands and thousands of Colt pistols that are 30, 40, 50 years old or older still in service that still function properly using the original parts like mainsprings, sear springs, disconnectors and other small parts.
So I would relax and just enjoy the gun.

Whether you are using American ANSI/SAAMI or European CIP published data in your loading you will find no published data that will present loading data above safe pressure limits (SAAMI 35,000 MAP or CIP 235 MPa) in “standard” 9MM loading data.

Yes there is higher pressure (+P) and (+P+) data available to apply, but this data is easy enough to avoid and usually clearly indicated in published data.

Experienced Handloaders will assure you this can be done.
The only caveat would be finding “one” load combination that would bring top accuracy in all three pistols.
This is another challenge in itself and usually not likely.
Usually one pistol or another prefers a slight “tweak” in the loading for top accuracy to be obtained.

But therein rest the challenge and the fun, so get some Handloading manuals, do your research, chose your equipment and load some up.

Good Luck :)
 

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9mm loads

All loads in manuals are to certain specs to function in all guns at safe pressure levels. That said, the main problem people have is over crimping! If you are loading jacketed rounds, set the crimp so you can see a faint line....really faint.. and you will be ok. Measuring is ok, but the variance in thickness of brass can make accurate numbers difficult. You have to pull the bullet to check this. And if you change bullet, double check this again. You can back it off a little for plated and lead bullets. NO ROLL CRIMPS! The 9mm is actually an easy cartridge to get good accuracy from. 231, Titegroup, Universal, and Bullseye have worked great for me.
 
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