1911Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just started shooting regularly and although I PROBABLY WOULDN'T DO IT ANY TIME SOON, I was wondering how much you have to spend up front and how difficult is it to reload? I understand you have to be careful, but is it relatively simple or complicated to do so?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
I'd suggest you get a copy of Dillon's catalog and look at the Square Deal B if you only want to load pistol ammo, go for the 550 if you want to load both rifle and pistol. In addition to the loader you'll need a good powder scale, a primer flip tray, a dial caliper and a case tumbler(to clean brass). Reloading isn't rocket science but I'd suggest you get someone who has done it for a while to show you the ropes. A good reloading manual goes thru the mechanics of the process step by step but hands on training is better.
Some pistol rounds are more forgiving to reload than others. The 45ACP is among the best as it's a low pressure round. The 40S&W and 9mm are more sensitive to overcharges and short OAL (bullet seating depth) but are still easy to reload with a little caution.
Don't make the mistake many newbie reloaders do and assemble max pressure "rocket" loads. There's really little need to and your margin for error is decreased, not to mention extra wear and tear on your gun.
By all means start reloading, you can do it and won't regret it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
582 Posts
YOU can go to R.C.B.S. web sight and it tells you step by step how to set up your dies. Get you a couple of reloading manuals and start reading. I started reloading a year or so ago. I love it, Wish I had more time to do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
516 Posts
I started reloading over 25 years ago and have loved every minute of it. I started with a Lee Loadet for less than $10.00. I eventually got an RCBS Jr and then a Dillon. I would recommend that you start with an inexpensive Lee or a used press of some sort. The initial investment can be high, but you can load ammo so cheap that it pays for itself very quickly. As far as difficulty goes, I cant paint, wire or do carpenter work. I can make very good ammunition and take great pride in it. You need to get a couple of manuals and read about reloading in the gun mags, but it isnt hard, it just takes a little thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
How hard is reloading? I reload and probably am the most mechanically challenged person in the world. Moreover, I still have all my fingers and body parts. So it cannot be too hard or unsafe.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,040 Posts
Just like you always see on TV: If I can do it, anybody can do it. Don't use common senses, just follow the book.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
766 Posts
RCBS site has step by step instructions. As for savings I would say 50% is a good savings mark for the frugal reloader. I would say with a single stage press and $100.00 bucks will get you started with the basic tools.


[This message has been edited by bowhunter (edited 11-23-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
458 Posts
If you're a 'Gear Head' and really enjoy precision tools, and...
If you can do relatively simple mechanical tasks (assemble a kid's bicycle, or change the spark plugs on an (older) car, and...
If you can read and follow relatively simple instructions, and....
if you can read and _FOLLOW_ a recipe (yeah, just like in a cook book), then...

You can safely and accurately reload.

SAVE MONEY -- NO WAY ! You gotta be kidding !!! You won't save money... you're just gonna shoot 3-to-4 times more ammo that you ever have before. Really!

Some of us SHOOT just to have empty brass to reload -- it IS kinda fun to make up a 1,000 rounds knowing full-well that your liberal, left-wing politicos are losing sleep 'cause you've got a lifetime stash of primers, bullets, brass and primers.

IT IS SORTA LIKE FREE SPEECH....or maybe more like that old computer add: "FREEDOM OF THE PRESS BELONGS TO THOSE WHO OWN ONE."

I really like doing this kind of stuff myself. I tie my own flies, and I load my own ammunition (Rifle, Shotgun, Revolver & Pistol).

Remember, the right to keep and bear arms is protected by the 2nd amendment; the right purchase or posess ammuntion is NOT. --CC
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
688 Posts
As the Capt said, you ain't gonna save any money; just shoot more.

I started in 1976 on a Lyman Spartan single stage. Weighed every charge because I couldn't afford a measure. I now have two benches totaling 15 feet in length. Approximately 12 feet is used to mount my reloading equipment. You know you're addicted when you start buying powder measures for each caliber.


Eddie

P.S. There are usually quite a few single stage presses and die sets listed on ebay. I see lots of stuff I don't need sell for reasonable prices. Everything I bid on winds up selling for about 20 percent more than a new one would cost. Go figure.

[This message has been edited by Eddie (edited 11-24-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,395 Posts
Guys reload for various reasons. Some do it to try and save money. Others to try and improve the accuracy in their guns. Still others to it to get more of a rudimentary understanding of ballistics and how they work in their firearms, and just for the sheer pleasure of doing it. Don't waste your money on single stage presses. Go ahead and spend a few more bucks on a Dillon (at least the SDB). I don't always have the cash to buy a case of ammo, but reloading allows me to buy 1000 bullets this week, 1000 primers next week, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
316 Posts
Originally posted by Capt_C:
...
Some of us SHOOT just to have empty brass to reload --
Hey, you're giving away the secret. I just told my wife I have to buy a 40 cal. pistol becuase I have several thousand pieces of empty 40 that I don't want to waste.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top