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What is the most important for accuracy?

  • Brass uniformity

    Votes: 9 14.8%
  • Powder weight consistency

    Votes: 33 54.1%
  • Bullet Seating

    Votes: 19 31.1%
  • Primers

    Votes: 0 0.0%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you guys think is the most important component of reloading for accuracy? Referring to Rifles
 

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My vote would be for bullet over all the choices given. I suppose the next would be bullet seating.
 

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I’ve been looking at getting an RCBS Chargemaster Combo 1500 so I can weigh each charge rather than drop each charge be volume. My chronograph velocity extreme spreads are too high and I feel weighing each charge would get them lower and help consistency in my shooting.
 

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My vote would be for bullet over all the choices given. I suppose the next would be bullet seating. I have never been a bench rest shooter, but for hunting the other things have essentially no impact of group size for a hunting rifle in my experience.
Evidently they do to an extent in bench rest shooting where thousands of an inch matter.

Regards,
Jerry
 

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Brass uniformity

Brass uniformity is very critical for accuracy. Run-out gauges are commonly used for precision shooting, to ensure proper case neck uniformity and case wall thickness. Powder weight consistency is important, but easily remedied for rifle shooting by measuring each powder charge on a scale. The proper bullet and bullet weight is critical for accuracy, and the amount of bearing surface for any given bullet is also critical for the particular twist rate and velocity used. The most accurate hand loaded round, carefully made, may not group at all with an un-accurized rifle. A quality barrel, a bolt face perfectly square, a free floated barrel, a good trigger......all are essential to shoot tiny groups.
 

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The bench rest guys I've been around spend so much time prepping brass, weighing dry and with water for volume measurements. Case trimming and neck turning and deburring the inside of the flash hole as well making sure the hole is centered and the same size all the cases. The same headstamp and lot of brass is another key to consistancy. Bullet seating is important and it's very important that you're seating it into a properly prepared and sorted case. So many of these guys use powder measures to drop the charges after being setup with a powder scale. So once I'm throwing uniform accurate charge weights I only weigh every tenth round or so. The most important componet for me starts with the brass.
Randy
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The reason I asked this was because I spent many hours working on some brass for my .223. Did all the little tricks mentioned aboved and my group sizes did not change. I have always heard that brass is so important but it didnt give me anything. So just seeing what everyone thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Also when I listed bullet seating I was meaning two things. The distance off the lands and the quality & consistancy of the seater dies. I am using standard RCBS .223 dies. Wonder if I should buy some Redding Benchrest???
 

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For short range brass prep and bullet selection is pretty important.

For long range powder consistency (velocity) is huge as vertical dispersion will result.
 

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For short range brass prep and bullet selection is pretty important.

For long range powder consistency (velocity) is huge as vertical dispersion will result.
+1 for what the Tom the Mod. posted consistency in range powder is the the most Accurate way the Good Scores and Shooting.......'

Clyde
 

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The reason I asked this was because I spent many hours working on some brass for my .223. Did all the little tricks mentioned aboved and my group sizes did not change. I have always heard that brass is so important but it didnt give me anything. So just seeing what everyone thought.
You didn't mention how well or poorly that your rifle shoots, but it's possible that your rifle isn't capable of shooting better than it already is.

The rifle itself is where the "potential" for accuracy is located. If the potential accuracy is only 1-1/2" at 100 yds it isn't going to make much difference what you do with your loading techniques.

A competitive benchrest rifle has a bolt face that is perfectly square to the threads in the action, zero movement of the action within the stock (most all are actually glued to the stock), and a match grade barrel that is perfectly fitted to the action so the axis of the bore is perpendicular to the bolt face and a chamber with tolerances so tight you have to prepare the brass just for it. The cost of just the barrel, chamber & fitting on a benchrest rifle typically cost more than most factory rifles.

Having said all that, if you really want to shoot small groups you have to ensure the rifle is capable.

As far as the poll goes, assuming you are shooting 300 yds or less I would choose the following order -
1. Brass preparation
2. Bullets a close second
3. Primers
4. Powder weight consistency

Interestingly enough when shooting at 300 yds or less benchrest shooters don't weigh their powder charges.
 

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Brass, brass, brass and then bullet seating (quality dies for resizing and seating) and then anything that reduces extreme spread.

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Its already shooting .75 inch 4 shot groups at 100. Using 69 grain sierra match bullets with N-133. Great Barrel and trigger setup. I just thought that after weighing cases and trimming necks that it would have gotten better. But that didnt happen. Was not worth the many hours I put into it. I expected to get .5 inch groups after all of that work.
 

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Its already shooting .75 inch 4 shot groups at 100. Using 69 grain sierra match bullets with N-133. Great Barrel and trigger setup. I just thought that after weighing cases and trimming necks that it would have gotten better. But that didnt happen. Was not worth the many hours I put into it. I expected to get .5 inch groups after all of that work.
If you have a 3/4" gun and 1 1/4" loads you will shoot 1 1/4", if you have a 3/4" gun and 1/2" loads you will shoot 3/4". I don't know how well you shoot a rifle but you or the gun may be limited to 3/4"(which is good). A gun will only shoot so good reguardless of what you do. Use to be any gun that would shoot 1" was considered a good gun, now everyone thinks any gun will shoot 1".
 

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It's not hard to shoot a good 3,4 or 5 shoot group . The true test for consistant rifle accuracy is how well your rifle shoots 10 shot groups. My AR-15 Space Gun Match Rifle and my Rem. 700 Varmint with will shoot .5 MOA 10 shot groups on demand. I think you might need to have something done to your rifle to help you. Make sure everything is tight. Check your scope for parallax issues. Maybe have someone else that you know is a good rifleman shoot it a couple of groups.
Good Luck,
Randy
 

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interestingly enough when shooting at 300 yds or less benchrest shooters don't weigh their powder charges.
You can get away with that in point blank benchrest. Using a $250 culver measure helps too...
 

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You can get away with that in point blank benchrest. Using a $250 culver measure helps too...
LOL - I'm showing my age, but I bought my Culver measure from Homer Culver himself before he passed away. I think I bought it in 1984. Just got the insert and had to buy a Lyman 55 to install it in. Works as good now as it did then.
 

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Its already shooting .75 inch 4 shot groups at 100. Using 69 grain sierra match bullets with N-133. Great Barrel and trigger setup. I just thought that after weighing cases and trimming necks that it would have gotten better. But that didnt happen. Was not worth the many hours I put into it. I expected to get .5 inch groups after all of that work.
There is more to brass preparation than just trimming necks and weighing cases. In my opinion the most important aspect of brass preparation is neck turning. Turning the necks will ensure the necks are sized uniformly around the entire diameter of the neck, it will also help to ensure the concentricity of the round as well as aligning the bullet properly with the bore.

Did you de-burr the flash-holes?
 

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Most double based stick powders are very good at tolerating charge to charge inconsistencies. I'd put my money on bullet seating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I turned the necks also. Thats what took so long. I turned 200 cases and picked the most uniform(all around) 20 cases to shoot with. I was surprised. I have a 220 swift ackley that I have shot one hole with 7 shots at 100 yards. I was hoping to make this gun that good as well. I guess I will try a different weight bullet and work up a load. 77's and 69's couldnt get any better than the 3/4". Thanks and I am loving this poll. Brass is what I always thought was #1 but I am thinking I was wrong.
 
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