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Got a nice 1911...except its covered in Cosmoline. Dont ask how or why its on there. Going to disassemble completely and let it sit on a boiling water for few minutes (with exception of springs and the grips), but one thing that does worry is the trijicon nightsights. They still work, and I am worried that hot water could damage them...anyone know if it would? :confused:
 

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I do not know. I might go a safer route and "decosmoline" the slide by hand with some type of solvent being careful around the sights.

YMMV greatly.
 

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It depends how the trits are secured in the sights. Often trits are secured with Norland 61 optical adhesive and the way to soften it for removal is by boiling in water. The reasoning is that water boils at 212 deg F at sea level... Hot enough to soften the adhesive but safe for the trit vials.

Have you tried WD 40 to soften the Cosmoline?
 

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Hi all.
We used good old GI gas to clean that crap off our brand new M1 Garands In the early 50s, and we all smoked while doing so, and no one went up In flames. WD40 was a long way off. I have not used It sinse, I'm happy to say!!!

Semper Fi all. Hank D.
 

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Boiling water....no. Solvent, paint thinner .....yes.

LOG
 

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Put it in the dishwasher. I've done garands and their stocks that way. The water is not boiling and if you remove the items while they are hot, they dry almost instantly. Run the dishwasher a second time with a cup of white vinegar. It probably could use the vinegar treatment anyway. Oh yeah, don't get caught.
 

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Put it in the dishwasher. I've done garands and their stocks that way. The water is not boiling and if you remove the items while they are hot, they dry almost instantly. Run the dishwasher a second time with a cup of white vinegar. It probably could use the vinegar treatment anyway. Oh yeah, don't get caught.
Vinegar is great at etching if etching is the goal. I think not.

LOG
 

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Careful use of a heat gun. Put some paper towels underneath to catch the drips.

I use a heat gun to remove cosmoline too, all of it drips off inside and out. it does produce a pretty high heat though, up to a 1000 degrees for some, most put out at least 500.
 

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I believe cosmoline is the trade name for what the Navy officially called "corrosion preventative compound, grade IV (MIL-C-11796 Class 3, Grade IV)". We used a variety of solvents to clean the waxy brown goo. Including Stoddard Solvent (PD-680) and a triclorethane based solvent that is now banned.

Mineral spirits will work great, so wil non-clorinated brake cleaner. Just do it out doors, and wear gloves.
 

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I have used WD-40 with good results at removing Cosmoline. And it safe, just not a good rust inhibitor.
 

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Vineger is to clean the washer not the 1911.
:biglaugh: :biglaugh: Okay that makes sense and am guilty of reading too fast.:biglaugh:

LOG
 

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As posted above, mineral spirits. I have cleaned numerous milsurp rifles and parts kits that were absolutely lousy with cosmolene. Wear old clothes, use an old toothbrush/paintbrush. It works.
 

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I could have been a little clearer. Yes, the vinegar is used to destroy the evidence after you use the dishwasher for cleaning the gun. It might even make you some points with the lady of the house for being thoughtful about housecleaning chores.
 
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