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Many years ago Jeff Cooper wrote of his way of removing lead from pistol barrels. He simply fired a few full jacketed rounds to push out the lead. They certainly fit the bore tight and I found that the small amount of copper fouling is easier to remove than lead fouling. (5)rounds seems to work OK. The jacketed bullets polish the bore also. I found the bore to be polished well enough, after a while, to prevent any leading. I used very hard lead bullets though, #2 alloy. The copper "wool" method works OK too. It is just more of a fuss in my opinion.
 

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Don't laugh, but I remember a while back of a method that was awesome. Mix together 50% vinegar with 50% hydrogen peroxide. Plug up one end of your barrel and fill it up to the top. Let the mixture sit in there till the bubbles stop bubblin'. Empty out.
Your barrel will have all the lead removed. The chemical reaction is not harmful to the barrel, only reacts with the lead.

To see for yourself, pour the mixure in a
small jar and drop in a small piece of lead- I cut off the end of a .22 rimfire bullet. The next morning the lead bullet will be gone! All that will be left is a "lead residue" on the bottom of the jar.

I read this on alt.guns (or something like that) newsgroup in 93 or 94. I tried it myself and it actually worked with 100 percent success. I even tried the 22 bullet experiment- It was really cool. The 50/50 mixture is non-toxic, although the dissolved lead itself would be toxic afterwords. You can even ingest the mixture with no ill effects. I also submitted this "recipe" on a usenet group that was chemistry related and bounced the topic on those guys. They all verified it as viable, but thought that I shouldn't dump the remains down the sink becuase the dissolved lead would hurt the little fishies at the other end.

Well, that's my unorthodox story. An off the shelf product that also worked for me was that yellow cloth (can't remember the name) that you run through the barrel. It's impregnated with a solvent that worked great for lead.

Take care,
David
1991A-1 CDR Model
 

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Discussion Starter #3
To dsonyay,

Facinating. Does the concoction remove the powder fouling also? Have you tried it for copper fouling? I don't know about the ingestion part though. What about noxious vapors being produced? Thanks for the info.

A little tale about removing lead from my shotgun barrel. Many years ago I read of using Blue-Ointment to remove lead fouling, because it contained mercury. I asked the local druggist for a tube of it to which he gave me a weird look. I didn't know at the time about the usual use for Blue-Ointment. Didn't work well as I recall.
 

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Hi,
Sorry for the delay. No fumes.
liquids are non-toxic. Yes you can actually ingest hydrogen peroxide. Notice on the label for the peroxide it does say that it is safe for gargling. So one must assume it's OK to ingest.

But anyway, I only used it for lead. It didn't really "clean" the barrel well. After I dried it off, I ran a patch through with oil, plus wiped the outsides too.

Go ahead and try the experiment. Just don't drink the liquid after the lead is removed


Take care
David
 

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To: dsonyay,
A lady at my place of employment told me a while ago the best way to make a dog regurgitate something it shouldn't have eaten is to pour a "shot" of hydrogen peroxide down it's throat. She had to do it once and the results were instantaneous. I don't know if it would affect humans the same way and I'm not going to try it for you. It is a neat substance. When I was reading about submarine warfare in WW2 I learned that the German navy used it to supply oxegen to their diesel engines while submerged. They actually outran a destroyer while submerged. But like everything else they tried, it was too little and too late.
Thanks for the reply,
Marty U.
 

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This topic has had lots of discussions on most of the boards that I monitor. Don't leave it in for more than 5 minutes. Consensus is that it will pit the heck out of the barrel. Back in the old days, the big boys used Mercury to clean their barrels, can you say dangerous?
 

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There are dozens of "safe" solvents out there that work great when used on a regular basis... shoot often, and clean often too. life is too short to desighn my own solvent. I'll leave that to the pro's!
Daniel ;-)

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1 peter 5:8
 

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Originally posted by maxwayne:
This topic has had lots of discussions on most of the boards that I monitor. Don't leave it in for more than 5 minutes.
Add to that it pitted the comps and took the blueing off some will sitting .
geo ><>
 

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As an experiment a couple of years ago, I had a junk BHP barrel I put in this solution. It did remove the lead. BUT, in just under 8 minutes, I could watch the rust form on the outside. I would assume that it would rust on the inside also. Hydrogen peroxide is a powerful oxidizer. It's possible that it would not affect all kinds of steel this way, but I would be real careful when using this solution.
 

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Originally posted by Car Knocker:
As an experiment a couple of years ago, I had a junk BHP barrel I put in this solution. It did remove the lead. BUT, in just under 8 minutes, I could watch the rust form on the outside. I would assume that it would rust on the inside also. Hydrogen peroxide is a powerful oxidizer. It's possible that it would not affect all kinds of steel this way, but I would be real careful when using this solution.

Pay close attention. NEVER EXPOSE YOUR BARREL TO HYDROGEN PEROXIDE!!!!!NO MATTER HOW DELUTED. A STANDARD CARBON STEEL BARREL WILL RUST, "OXDIZE" IN VERY SHORT ORDER...my little experiment cost me $$$...take it for what it's worth.
 

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My gunsmith's advice for removing lead residue in the barrel without damaging the rifling or barrel itself was to remove the barrel, make sure it is clean and product (oil, solvent, etc.) free, heat it over a gas stove (watch them fingers!...), then pass a few patches through...voila! (fortunately this was a friend's gun I was inquiring about
)
 

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I dont suggest using the peroxide/vinegar method at all, to much of a chance for terminal damage, the vinegar is an acid.

I have used a Lewis Lead Remover for 25 years and it works. No musss no fuss, get one from www.brownells.com in the caliber or your choice.

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No man is above the law and no man is below it. Nor do we ask any mans permission when we require him to obey it.
 

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Geeze call me old fashoned but I always have no trouble with an RBC or Hoppes soaked bronze brush and a little scrubbing. Run a clean patch through and if you see any patches of lead scrub some more. Never takes more than a few times to get a clean bore.


Tony G.
 

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Originally posted by Sniper:
My gunsmith's advice for removing lead residue in the barrel without damaging the rifling or barrel itself was to remove the barrel, make sure it is clean and product (oil, solvent, etc.) free, heat it over a gas stove (watch them fingers!...), then pass a few patches through...voila! (fortunately this was a friend's gun I was inquiring about
)
Running a Boresnake through at the range while the barrel is still warm helps a lot, too.
 

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Just want to clarify, that I don't actually clean my barrel with the vinegar/hydro-peroxide method. I just tried it a couple of times. I never did have any sort of rusting problems though. I also agree that using a homemade cleaner is not best due to the facty that there are many cleaners out there that are probably better and safer backed by lots of testing.
But the test I did was fun and provided humer when showing what the mixture did to a lead bullet after a few hours.

It's fun to discuss these things anyway. Speaking of products, does the Bore Snake remove lead well?

Thanks!
David
 

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I've had very good success with dropping my barrel into a container of Kroil overnight. The penetrating oil seeps between the lead and the barrel and one or two passes with a 50 cal brush removes all of the lead. I'm a bit partial to Shooters Choice, so I then clean the barrel with some Shooters to get rid of the powder residue.
Crazy
 

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Anybody know if its OK to dunk the barrel in kerosene and then follow it up with CLP? Thanks!
 

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This works extremely well, is fast and cheap: Go to the grocery store and get a copper pan scrubber. Really doesn't matter if it's the fine or coarse strand type but the coarse works a little better. Tear out a chunk (careful, it can probably cut you although I've been lucky sofar) and wrap it around a bronze bore brush-- an old one is OK. It has to be tight enough in the bore that it's hard to start. Go back and forth maybe 6-10 times and the lead is GONE.

I remember seeing Ken Tapp one time using a cordless drill with a bore brush in it... this works better and faster, and no damage at all to the barrel. Bet I've cleaned one of my barrels this way 100+ times and it still shoots 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 at 25 yards.
 

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The 50/50 mix of vinegar and hydrogen peroxide turns the lead into lead acetate which is very toxic so be careful not to get it on your skin, in your eyes, or in your mouth. I think this mix can may pit or corrode steel. I use it at times and it does work for heavily leaded barrels. I am going to check this mix for steel/stainless steel corrosion in the Chem lab I work at and will report back.
 
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