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Discussion Starter #1
I know I've seen this discussion but haven't been able to find it in archives.
What is a good process for removing light scratches from stainless?
Thanks.
 

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Where are the scratches? It could have a bearing on the responses received.

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Rust never sleeps...
 

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Cheap way - try Mother's polish. It is an all-purpose metal cleaner & polisher. You can find it in the automotive section.
Another cheap way - "0000" steel wool with light oil in a circular pattern.
If the scratches are too deep, then your local gunsmith could buff them out with an electric buffer/polisher/grinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Originally posted by Havoc:
Where are the scratches? It could have a bearing on the responses received.
Havoc:
Sorry to be so long replying. My server was down last night.
I put a couple of small scratches on it the first time I re-installed the slide release lever. Sort of semi-circles. Then a couple of days ago I took it to a gunsmith to have my rear signt centered, and he left some scuffs back where he used a rear sight adjustment tool and also he wasn't very careful with the slide release lever.
The moral: adjust your rear sight yourself next time.
Be careful with the slide release lever. I'm learning.
Thanks for the suggestions.
 

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Texian

If your frame is matte finished (bead blasted), you may have to have it touched up with a blast.

I haven't tried it, but someone posted that on a matte finish, you can take sand paper and lay it face down on the metal, then tap very lightly with a small hammer. Obviously, you'd have to experiment with different grits and pressure but that might be an alternative to try.

If your slide and frame are more of a "brushed" look, I've touched them up with fine sandpaper that matches the grain - again you have to experiment with various grades and pressure. The key to matching well is to move the paper exactly the same direction as the existing grain.

HTH

JSP
 
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