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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in replacing the titanium firing pin in my Mil Spec with a steel one. As I understand it; Springfield uses a .38 Super titanium firing pin with an extra power spring to pass the Commie drop test.

I'm am looking at Ed Brown and Wilson Combat for replacements. I noticed on Ed Brown's site, that they sell a firing pin specifically for Springfields.

Basically I'm wondering if I do decide to replace my firing pin, will I have to get a .38 firing pin, the one made by Ed Brown for Springfields, or will a .45 ACP firing pin fit? Not sure if they just use the .38 firing pin in a .45 hole, or if the hole is specifically cut for the .38. And I assume (though I try not to) that with a steel firing pin, I could just use a basic firing pin spring.

Thanks in advance.
 

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If you replace the firing pin the pistol can firing if drop on the muzzle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Then why do they make guns such as the Series 70 Colt? I'm not trying to be a smart ass, I just don't think it's that big of a problem if firing pin safety systems are not mandated. Of course, I am not all knowing, but that's just my best guess.
 

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This is an old thread, revived the other day, which describes an AD apparently caused by dropping an SA 1911-style .45acp muzzle down on a hard surface. The pistol was "pre titanium firing pin" vintage. The OP was scratched up, but not badly hurt. The point was/is, that apparently a steel fp equipped 1911, will discharge if the pistol is dropped under the right (?) circumstances.

http://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=217601

Its a personal choice whether you choose to shoot/carry a pistol that is more prone to an AD when dropped, than an alternative which is less prone.
 

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I was getting light primer strikes on both my loaded longslide and my Champion (which I had bobtailed). I wanted to use a 19 pound mainspring in the longslide, so changing firing pins was compulsory.
I ordered new oversize stainless steel firing pins from EGW and new extra power firing pin springs from Wolff.
The firing pin dropped right in on the longslide, but no such luck in the Champion. The Champion's firing pin hole was one or two thousands smaller than the hole in the longslide. I gently chucked the firing pin in a drill and reduced the small diameter with fine sandpaper till it dropped in freely, then polished the surface and installed it.
The light strikes are gone, even with the 19 pound mainspring in the longslide.

Mission accomplished.

Bill.
 

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SA uses its own size firing pin, its not a .45 ACP, but its not a .38 super either. I believe it is somewhere in between....
 

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That's odd, I have a 19# MS in my Champion Loaded with the stock FP and FPS and have not had any light strikes. Something else is going on there to cause the light strikes.
 

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I installed the Ed Brown steel #826 firing pin in my Loaded about a week after I bought the pistol. This is the proper size.

I also installed the Ed Brown #816S mainspring housing with the #919 mainspring.

-- Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm not trying to make my pistol unsafe, although I do know why they used the titanium set up. But I also recall reading a thread here about how these pistols were designed for steel firing pins; I think in the gumsmithing section.

Either way, everyone knows that no amount of safety can prevent human error. It reminds me of the famous video where a DEA agent shoots himself in the foot with a Glock. with it's amazing safety systems. But to his credit, he played it off like a man.
 

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Is there something wrong with the titanium firing pin that came with the gun? If not, why would you want to swap it out? Make absolutely no sense what so ever if there's nothing wrong with the current firing pin.
 

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I would keep the titanium FP as is. It is debatable about "these pistols were designed for steel firing pins". Unless there are some credible evidences that titanium FP caused any functioning problem or inferior to steel FP what so ever, I will not spend the money to replace it.
 

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The only reason for the titanium firing pin to to meet the totally unrealistic California pistol drop test. Titanium has less impact resistance than steel but I've not heard of a titanium firing pin crumbling.

-- Chuck
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for the responses. This is why I like this place, good, honest opinions from those more knowledgeable than I.

The firing pin shall remain in place until I can find a more logical reason to mess with it; not that I'm looking for one. Now that I think about it, I'm not even sure why I originally wanted to change it out. :confused:

I think I just wanted to do something to my 1911. Maybe when I gain more knowledge and experience I can start noodling with my guns. Until then, I will use my ignorance to guide me to correct information.

Thanks again all.
 

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I was getting some light primer hits w/ my stock TRP Titanium FP, so I got the Ed Brown "Springfield" Firing Pin and am using a Wolf XP FP Spring. That fixed it. Springfield's stock FP spring must be xxxxx power.
 

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Might not some of the light primer hits be due to >

the use of hard or coated primers thus making it an ammo related and not a firing pin problems at all? I am not for or against Ti firing pins, though I do remember a time they were "for competition use only and not for carry guns" as they reportedly decreased the firing time, as they were originally being sold before the Ca drop test standard. The only problem I've ever noted with TI firing pins is earlier wear compared to quality steel ones.
 

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I was having light strikes with my trp so i put the brown #826 and that solved all the problems with the light primmer strikes. The brown #826 is a very good fireing pin.
 

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Thanks for the responses. This is why I like this place, good, honest opinions from those more knowledgeable than I.

The firing pin shall remain in place until I can find a more logical reason to mess with it; not that I'm looking for one. Now that I think about it, I'm not even sure why I originally wanted to change it out. :confused:

I think I just wanted to do something to my 1911. Maybe when I gain more knowledge and experience I can start noodling with my guns. Until then, I will use my ignorance to guide me to correct information.

Thanks again all.

That-a-boy! Use some logic before making a decision. I know logic is kind of a dirty word on this forum. Most folks see something like swapping out firing pins posted by a bunch of people and their brain tells them that they have to do it also. Even though there is absolutely, positively no logical reason to do so, people will do it simply because others are doing it. Just like getting rid of the ILS MSH and getting a non-ILS MSH. Makes no sense at all, but people continue to do it. And a lot of them don't even know why they're doing it, just that everyone must be swapping them out for some legit reason... when there isn't one.

Good job on using you head before getting sucked in. :)
 

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Either way, everyone knows that no amount of safety can prevent human error. It reminds me of the famous video where a DEA agent shoots himself in the foot with a Glock. with it's amazing safety systems. But to his credit, he played it off like a man.
Why in the world would you say anything positive about that dangerous clown!?
 
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