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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just recently bought a revovler, but I am having the toughest time getting the carbon build up off the front part of the cylinders. Any advice? I am using Hoppe's lead remover. I'm only shooting lead bullets. Thanks in advance.
 

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If it is a stainless revolver, I use a small brass brush with a gun solvent you can get at any gun store.
If it's a blue gun, I use a nylon tooth brush with a gun solvent. More difficult to remove, but will not mess up the blueing.;)
 

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If it's a blue gun, stick with a brass tooth brush-type brush and solvent.

If it's stainless, buy a Lead Away type cloth at the gun store.
These are yellow cloths that strip lead and fouling right off.

WARNING: It will also strip bluing right off.....use on stainless ONLY.
 

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If you are referring to the blast rings on the cylinder front face, they can be very difficult and time consuming to remove. I think that the best way to deal with them is just to clean the front face of the cylinder and the rear of the forcing cone to maintain the barrel/cylinder gap and forget about removing the blast rings. Besides, I think that they add "character " to a revolver.
 

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Three step process to clean blast rings

jdiaz,

I use a three step process to clean the blast rings off my SS revolvers.

1) To get the curd off the handgun, clean the revolver like you normally would.

2) Add some lead cutting cleaning solvent to the front of the cylinder and let stand for 5 or 10 minutes, scrub with bronze brush, and rinse off with your choice of cleaning solvent. I think the lead cutting cleaning solvent is either Hoppes or Shooters Choice, but it's a thick creamy liquid.

3) Rub remaining stain off with a "lead removing cloth". You can buy these at almost any gun shop.

STAINLESS STEEL ONLY!!!!!!!!!!

Respectfully,

jkelly
 

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I've had pretty good luck with MPro 7. I spray it on the cylinder face and let it sit for a while then scrub it with a nylon brush. I really didn't expect it to work as well as it did.

It's safe for blue or stainless guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the help. Jumping into the world of revolvers was a big step for me. Always used semi-autos. It was a lot of fun plinking around on my steel targets yesterday. Just a pain the butt to clean it up like brand new.
 

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I use the nylon scrubber pads that my wife uses in the kitchen. They do a good and fast job of removing that carbon.

I always run a patch with No9 through the cylinder, and let it soak for awhile. I don't think that really makes it easier for the nylon pad.

I haven't found a way to get the carbon off the area where the barrel comes through the frame though. The area is too small to get anything between the barrel and frame.

Jerry
 

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defariswheel is right on about the Lead Away cloth on a stainless revolver! Works great on my stainless Ruger Vaquero.




Nero
 

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I employ a three step process for those dark rings.

1. Ignore them.

2. Ignore them.

3. Ignore them.

If they really get me and steps 1-3 fail, I use a steel brush to clean off the buildup (yes, on a blued gun), then revert to step 1.

Jim
 

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I like to keep my 629 Classic in like new condition. I use shooters choice with a nylon toothbrush to get rid of most of the crud and then remove any remaining stains with Flitz Fiberglass and Paint Restorer. Don't let the name get to you, it works great on stainless and is a less abrasive version of Flitz and doesn't effect or change the finish. It works like magic on powder stains on the frame or cylinder. I put some on a piece of string and draw it thru between the barrel and frame.

You remove it like you would wax. I then clean with G96 to get any residual off. It's low abrasive but still abrasive.

Dog
 

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I do quick job with a brass brush and the powder solvent de' jeur (MPro7 or Hoppes) and then I follow Jim keenan's three steps, in order.
 

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JerryM said:
I haven't found a way to get the carbon off the area where the barrel comes through the frame though. The area is too small to get anything between the barrel and frame.

Jerry
A Q-tip dipped in chrome polish rips the carbon burns off the frame and cylinder face pretty fast, a toothbrush works as well. The tight space between the cone end and frame strap can be cleaned by working the polish under with a toothpich and scrubbing with a narrow nylon cleaning brush. You can also fold a cloth and force it into the gap and slide it back and forth like buffing shoes with some polish on it.

The burn rings inside the tubes are the real bugger to get out. My best method is to use a nylon bore brush on a short rod with a low speed drill. I take a half inch square of green pot scrubber pad and cram it down onto the side of the brush. Jam it into the cylinder tube with the pad on the black glazed ring and spin for about five seconds. Usually rips it right out.
 
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