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Discussion Starter #1
I often wonder what meathod of metal hardening Rock River uses on their parts? I heard there is a real good process called "Induction Forging" which is used to the firearms industry. Whereas metal is heated by Induction meathod and pounded into shape. I love to hear stories of no re-melted steel, "Certified Steels" and great hardening as it relates to Quality Control! It sure looks like Rock River uses some type of Robotic Polishing Stations to put the final finish. Their finish is one of the best I have seen.
 

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Forging and heat treating are not the same thing so I'm a little confused as to which you are referring to. Rock River slides and frames are made from forgings (ref. RRA website). They also specify the condition (Rockwell hardness) of the finished parts.

I guess now I'm asking "What's the question?"
 

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I'm sure they use the method specified for the steel they use, which IIRC is a 4300 series alloyed steel. You can do some research but to get to the specified hardness ranges they have to take the steel to a certain temperature and hold it there for a specified time, then cool over a certain amount of time. To temper the hardness back an additional lower temperature cycle will be required. just get a materials handbook and read about it if you are curious.

Putting the finish on the flat is as simple as putting the slide or frame in a surface grinder. No brainer. Hand work is required for a mirror finish, but the finish they use is easily attained in a surface grinder.

This stuff is not a mystery. It is published in any number of technical manuals.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I know that the two processes are not the same CCV. Personally, I don't seem to understand why any gun making buisness would not employ only the best. I didn't get mine yet and just have to wait it out. I am sure it will meet or exceed my requirements - well, hopefully!
 

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polishing

I thought I would give you guys a little inside info. We get our initial frames and slides in with the flats surface ground, but after all the work that we do to them, the flats get marred and don't look all that great. Chuck takes them to the buffing room and actually re-polishes the flats on a hard polish wheel by hand. Everything that you see on your pistols are all done by hand (minus the help from the bridgeports for barreling and sight cuts, and the machine shop checkers the front strap). Other than that, dremmils and files are the Custom Shops only tools of the trade.

Thought you might like to know.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Dr. Bob,
I still cannot see how you people keep those edges so perfect? It just seems that it would be harder then hell to keep something so steady on a well at a couple of hundred RPMs. I really like the finish on the Rock River. The first one that I saw was at a distance - at a match. Darn nicest pistol on the line. Like I said, I'll just have to wait to get mine. Hopefully, soon! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
another question?????????

Dr. Bob,
One more thing....... Are your frames and slides machined on real good CNC machines?
 

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Frames are forged by S&W and machined by Continental Machine & Tool on "real good" CNC's. RRA does the finish work (barrel fitting, sight cuts, checkering)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Rock River QC

S&W does some job of forging from what I hear. I guess that answered my question. "Real good" must be just that. I seriously doubt that guns of this quality & tolerances could be built in the 30's. However, I've heard that the 1933 era Colt 1911 Commerical Model had been real works of art. The question remains and persists. How is Rock River so darn good and not given the notice that it deserves? Seems to be too low key marketing or not enough exposure? Hey, I've got many other ones. Colts, S&W, Springfield. But this Rock River looks like something else!
 

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Have you ever seen a good Japanese sword from several centuries ago? The metal is absolutely incredible, and this was done by hand, you can actually see the grain of the metal. S&W does a very nice job of forging, in that they are one of the few that actually have the equipment to do it, at least in the US. I don't know all the details of what RR does but I love my pistol and if there is a weak part, it is me.
 

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Snaffle said:
Have you ever seen a good Japanese sword from several centuries ago? The metal is absolutely incredible, and this was done by hand, you can actually see the grain of the metal.
A friend of mine who is much into martial arts says the scrap rate was (and still is for traditional swordsmiths) about 50%. You have to do better than that nowadays to make money. Although it seems some companies ship 'em all.
 

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"I don't know all the details of what RR does but I love my pistol and if there is a weak part, it is me."

here is true Martial Arts thinking..........!
 

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Thanks, White Spider:
The Japanese swords that I refered to were in a London museum. I've got a ways to go before they put me in there as well.
 

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By the way I'm assuming that RdB has the right info. If he is #47 then I know who he is. S&W forges for Kimber, Remington, RR?,Harley Davidson and many more I'm sure. Forges are big things and there ain't many new ones.
 
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