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Hey everyone,
New here. I’m picking up a new Springfield Ronin 1911 in 10mm today. I’ve been reading that the springs in some 1911’s can’t handle full power 10mm loads. I’ve tried to google, but can’t find any info. Does anyone know if the Ronin can handle full power 10mm loads, or do I need to look for a replacement spring right away? Thanks
 

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Those are questions you should have had asked before purchasing.
 

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Not sure about your Google search results, but many pertainent results came back on my Google search.

Even one in American Rifleman -- seems a pretty positive review overall and relative to your question:


You might be wise to begin shooting with lighter-to-mid-range 10mm loads.

It's not just a matter of springs. A lot of things come into play.

But keeping it simple, if you shoot 10mm it often makes good sense to have a small collection of various recoil springs.

The strongest spring that functionally performs reliably is generally the one to use. There's no really great substitute for experience with your own gun and ammo.

Of course, there are some shooters that will go immediately to the stoutest full power loads on just about any 10mm gun, no matter their gun's setup, design, etc..."just because".
 

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I'd probably call SA and ask them
Hey everyone,
New here. I’m picking up a new Springfield Ronin 1911 in 10mm today. I’ve been reading that the springs in some 1911’s can’t handle full power 10mm loads. I’ve tried to google, but can’t find any info. Does anyone know if the Ronin can handle full power 10mm loads, or do I need to look for a replacement spring right away? Thanks
The way I see it the Ronin is a brand new factory 10mm by a reputable manufacturer. Shoot any an all factory loads you can find(good luck with that). I recently bought a Rock Island ultra 10mm and it hasn’t had a single factory round through it. I’ve had 4 mos of load development and it shoots everything I’ve made no issues. If you reload buy new brass and experiment with light to full power. It will be fun and have confidence, the Ronin will handle it!
 

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To add to my earlier post--

Even the best built 10mm 1911 imaginable will perform better and/or have a longer life if the recoil spring is well-matched to the ammo. 10mm encompasses such a wide range of power factors that the best matched spring for a lighter load cannot possibly be the best matched spring for the heaviest Buffalo Bore round.

Your gun can probably handle pretty strong loads. But just because it can doesn't necessarily mean that it's a great idea, unless of course you're trying to stop a very large, very hostile critter. In the latter situation, the gun is there to protect you, not the other way around.

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My 10mm chambered 1911 (Wilson Hunter, original design) has a double chamber compensator to help "tame" the stresses of heavy 10mm loads. Being Wilson, it's obviously well built. Even so, I don't go to the very strongest Buffalo Bore loads. I stop short of the 700ft.lbs energy factors. And carry a .375 H&H chambered rifle in places where heavier loads are advisible.
 
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^^^^If it's fun, you gotta do it!!!

And good advice also.
 

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There are a couple threads on 10mm in the archives. Do a search and you will learn how to tame the slide speed and help dissipate the recoil impulse. Even then, with major loads, you are in magnum cartridge territory. But its a hoot to shoot!
 
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