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Was reading one post that lead to a thought...area under grips get prone to rust if not oiled/cleaned etc...the question...which grip material would be less prone to have rust get started under them? My first thought was a wrap around rubber grip would seem to be more rust friendly but maybe all materials would be friendly to that environment. Your thoughts?
 

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Yes, rubber is one of the worst. It's very porous.

Wood grips are stabilized, and plastic typically doesn't attract or hold moisture.

I always put a coat of high quality car wax on my frame under my grips, regardless of what they are made from. Don't polish the wax off (but don't leave gobs of it on your pistol either! :) ). I've never had a problem with rust under the grips with a layer of wax under them.
 

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...I always put a coat of high quality car wax on my frame under my grips, regardless of what they are made from....
Great idea. I have two 1911s (Colt Officer and Springfield Loaded) that usually sport CT grips. My Springfield gets shot less, therefore cleaned less, and I noticed a couple very small spots of rust last time I shot & cleaned it. CT grips have plastic gaskets that probably act as a barrier, prohibiting evaporation during the humid Kansas summer months.

Wax is a good idea.
 

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Whatever grip material,I always put a "Frame-Saver"(as sold by Alumagrips) under the grips with a coat of my current favorite lube underneath them.

Don't know anybody else who even uses these things;or,anybody who has ever even shown interest in them.

They work to prevent scratches(from metal grips) and rust/oxidation. Cheap and thorough prevention.
 

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plastic, rubber, or wood, just take off the stock once in a while, and wipe down.
 

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I found that auto wax doesn't do a very good job and turns white.

I recommend applying a medium thick coat of Johnson's Paste Wax or the excellent Renaissance Hard Museum wax, let dry 20 minutes or so, then put the grips back on.

If you have wood or synthetic you can also coat the inside of the grips, but NOT rubber grips.
 

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I use a lot of lube. Invariably it gets under the grips and stays there. I just take the grips off once a year and wipe, leaving a film of lube. Regardless of grip material, moisture tends to get behind the grips and stay there. You just have to pay attention to it.
 

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I use the excellent Hogue rubber grips when I am building a gun, but not permanent. I also do not use plastic grips.

Wood is nice, but I also use the excellent bone grips I found on ebay. Supposedly they are from water buffalos in Thailand, but they look like Ivory and only cost about $25.

The black ones are water buffalo horn.

http://forums.1911forum.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=100243&d=1369624911
 
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