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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys, I have a friend that is wanting to sell a Smith revolver. Neither of us know to much about revolvers, so any info on this gun would be appreciated.
Info such as the model and how much it's worth would be great, thanks



 

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Probably want to move this to the revolver section, but to help you out that's a S&W Model 60 "Stainless Chief's Special." Looks to be about early '70s vintage but I don't have my reference handy to verify the s/n date. It is the stainless variant of the Model 36 that came out in 1950.

The funky grip on the right is a plastic Barami Hip Grip to allow holsterless IWB carry. Assuming the gun is in great mechanical shape, it's worth between $350 and $400 probably in the current market. It would be worth a few more dollars if you have the original grip panel to go with it. These are excellent carry guns and still exceptionally popular.
 

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Yes a model 60, I would love to own one myself, but a bit pricy for me at the moment
 

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Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh weedhopper well said on the +p in a lightweight, very vicious on the hand
 

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don't ever shoot +ps in one of those airweights.
I agree with that this is an unpleasant combination, but just to be clear, that's not an airweight model. That's an all-steel model 60 and was built to shoot .38s up the level we now call "+p." Shooting +p in those is a little sharper than modern standard .38s, but not "harsh."
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Probably want to move this to the revolver section, but to help you out that's a S&W Model 60 "Stainless Chief's Special." Looks to be about early '70s vintage but I don't have my reference handy to verify the s/n date. It is the stainless variant of the Model 36 that came out in 1950.

The funky grip on the right is a plastic Barami Hip Grip to allow holsterless IWB carry. Assuming the gun is in great mechanical shape, it's worth between $350 and $400 probably in the current market. It would be worth a few more dollars if you have the original grip panel to go with it. These are excellent carry guns and still exceptionally popular.
Thanks for the info Kamerer. So, 300 dollars would be a very fair price, right ? The other side of the grip is missing but it is in good mechanical condition.
 

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$300 would be a good "between friends" price. it's probably a little below market, but not so low that you'd feel guilty, and he could feel good because he didn't charge you too much. I call it the "between friends" price; lots of folks do it that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Kamerer- Thanks for your insight and prompt replies. You have been a big help.:)
 

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Kamerer- Thanks for you insight and prompt replies. You have been a big help.
Glad to help. These are good guns - I just have a weird love/indifference relationship to them. I buy one, carry it some, then stop because I carry a snubbie k frame more or a 1911. Then I want some "play money" so I sell the J. Then six months later I feel I need a "pocket" gun so of course i start shopping for a S&W 36 or 60. Then, repeat. I have been through four in the last six years.

That one looks like a good one - get some mother's mag polish and some tube socks and polish it up. Get a full pair of j-frame factory walnut grips for it (cheap; look on ebay) and a "Tyler-T" grip adapter (sample pic below) and it will shoot just fine and be controllable.

I'm so jealous of your cheap prices and how quick it is to purchase a firearm in the States hahaha
FirearmsEnthusiast - freedom is only a ride on the big silver bird away. Just don't take Oceanic Flight 815. ;)

Ok, this is a K-frame with the tyler - dont' have a picture of one of my "ex"-J's with them, thought I did. But it's the same idea/proportion:
 

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J frames are such utilitarian guns... everyone needs a couple. And the newer Airweight Js are rated for Plus Ps. Not a steady diet, though. Here's 2 of mine. The 649 rode in my pocket daily until the 442 came along.
Bob


 

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Glad to help. These are good guns - I just have a weird love/indifference relationship to them. I buy one, carry it some, then stop because I carry a snubbie k frame more or a 1911. Then I want some "play money" so I sell the J. Then six months later I feel I need a "pocket" gun so of course i start shopping for a S&W 36 or 60. Then, repeat. I have been through four in the last six years.

That one looks like a good one - get some mother's mag polish and some tube socks and polish it up. Get a full pair of j-frame factory walnut grips for it (cheap; look on ebay) and a "Tyler-T" grip adapter (sample pic below) and it will shoot just fine and be controllable.



FirearmsEnthusiast - freedom is only a ride on the big silver bird away. Just don't take Oceanic Flight 815. ;)

Ok, this is a K-frame with the tyler - dont' have a picture of one of my "ex"-J's with them, thought I did. But it's the same idea/proportion:
Yep, I just need a job sponsor willing to take on a apprentice gunsmith lol. It isn't easy finding one that's for sure.

I like the look of those tyler grips. Does it make a dramatic difference in comfort do you reckon?
 

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I like the look of those tyler grips. Does it make a dramatic difference in comfort do you reckon?
Oh yes. makes the gun much more easy to control. Notice how on all of Bob's pictured guns he has combat grips with extra material ahead of the front strap? Same idea.
 

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The S&W model 60 is one of only two revolvers I own. I'm more of an auto-loader type of guy, but I refuse to sell or trade off either one of these two.

The 60 was a gift and the model 696 is just to accurate to part with. The trigger on the .44 is one of the best I've ever squeezed. Also, they are a discontinued model and pretty hard to find for the people looking for one.

My model 60 "snubbie" has a lot of sentimental value to me. Out of all my guns, it's the only one I would never part with.

 

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The M60 pictured is indeed not an Airweight, but a standard stainless steel gun. However, it also has the pinned barrel that was eliminated around '82-'83 forever on S&W revolvers . . . so it's a GOOD thing to see this nice, earlier version.

Ditto on using the Tyler T-grip inserts in front of the stocks . . . either your standard S&W stocks (grips) like are pictured on the left side of the original gun, or dress the gun up with stags like I like to.

Here are some photos of a 1971 blued Model 37 Airweight (the "blued" aluminum framed lightweight version) of the Model 60. This revolver is my "always" CCW pocket gun . . . and for all the right reasons:

FIRST, WITH ORIGINAL S&W STOCKS + black gloss Tyler T-grip. Classy, retro, and SOOOO good shooting and easy on the hand! That's why Tylers were so popular back "in the day" as well as NOW! The Tyler makes this gun fit so well, that it shoots like a real pussycat!




TODAY . . . This M37's stocks were too pristine to ding up . . . and serial numbered to the gun, so I put 'em in the safe and replaced 'em (dressing up the gun immensely IMHO) with American Elk Stag grips by Patrick Grashorn. I have his grips on my most special Smith revolvers.




FYI, the THIRD version of the J-frame with a hammer, and also the first of the three types produced, is the carbon steel framed Model 36. It was, and still is available in either blued or bright nickle-plated finishes.

Here's my early "square latch"/"Diamond stocked" Model 36 in original, bright nickle plate. Smith dropped the expense of putting the "diamond" in the center of the original stocks around 1967-'68, going to the type stock pictured on my '71 Model 37. IIRC, Smith dropped the "square" type cylinder latch sometime around '66:




Hope this helps! BTW, they shoot really well too for the experienced handgunner! They can be extremely accurate, though their short sight to sight distance makes it more of a challenge to line the sights up PERFECTLY to shoot 'em well.

Here's the very first cylinder I fired after purchasing that vintage M36 a couple of years ago. FIVE ROUNDS inside of a 1" black square target, with perfect "point-of-aim" . . . at a distance of ten yards . . . STANDING and unsupported. Definitely a keeper!



Same session, standing/unsupported at twenty-five yards into a 2 1/2" square . . . yep . . . great guns you can stake your life on indeed!




HOPE THIS HELPS!

T.
 

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All stainless early model 60, I have one just like it, unbelievably accurate if you can see the small sights. Very desirable, I love mine.
 
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