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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Put her through the grind over the weekend, 500 rounds and not a single issue, 124,147 grains no problem, pretty accurate for a conceal firearm. In fact very accurate! The trigger issue that most ppl rant about I couldn't see anything relatively wrong w the stock trigger. After all is a backup handgun, secondary weapon, or used for CCW..

I almost got me the Springfield XDS, I'm glad that I didn't.. Very happy with it and I'm actually quite impressed too.. Good stuff!
 

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I've only gotten about 200rds thru mine but my experience is the same as yours.i just got my MS holster for it the other day. I plan to use the gun as a BUG or a lighter CCW when needed.
 

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About 300 rounds through mine. No failures, reasonably accurate and the trigger is livable. For the past few weeks, it has become my primary ccw firearm. It is so thin and light you almost forget it's there. Very easy to carry.

I'm sure it is not for everyone which is why there are so many different types of firearms out there. I like it.

Jeff
 

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I've been pretty impressed with mine, too. Love the way it feels in the hand and carries. Very slim and light but I am also able to make good, consistent hits with mine.

BUT

I reached out to S+W via e-mail recently for a call tag to send it back and have them address a lot of light primer strikes and a few FTRB. I have a few hundred rounds through it and had carried it but stopped carrying after my last couple trips to range with it. The last trip had it happening way too often for a carry gun so it's going back for them to sort out. I feel I've run enough ammo through it to correct anything that could have been corrected by a "break-in" period. I actually don't mind a break-in in a new, factory mass-produced gun. It kind of makes sense to me that certain parts will "wear-in" with use but I don't think it should take more than a couple hundred rounds.

I'm pretty mad at myself for putting it into service without sufficient proof that it was 100%. On a NEW gun, I'm going back to no less than 500 consecutive, error free rounds fired before I will carry it.
 

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I wanted to add I'm looking forward to getting it fixed and will give it a fair shot when I get it back. I hope it's truly 'fixed' because I am looking forward to having it as a carry gun.
 

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Never any problems with mine,close to 500 rnd's.;)
love it! Now if only Glock would do one:D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've been pretty impressed with mine, too. Love the way it feels in the hand and carries. Very slim and light but I am also able to make good, consistent hits with mine.



BUT



I reached out to S+W via e-mail recently for a call tag to send it back and have them address a lot of light primer strikes and a few FTRB. I have a few hundred rounds through it and had carried it but stopped carrying after my last couple trips to range with it. The last trip had it happening way too often for a carry gun so it's going back for them to sort out. I feel I've run enough ammo through it to correct anything that could have been corrected by a "break-in" period. I actually don't mind a break-in in a new, factory mass-produced gun. It kind of makes sense to me that certain parts will "wear-in" with use but I don't think it should take more than a couple hundred rounds.



I'm pretty mad at myself for putting it into service without sufficient proof that it was 100%. On a NEW gun, I'm going back to no less than 500 consecutive, error free rounds fired before I will carry it.


I hate this misconception that a firearm needs X amount of rounds to be considered reliable. The fact to this misconception is the lack of proper training in firearms malfunctions, or better said, "malfunction training" proper grip, stance, body posture, and the many other topics of training possible.

Many people carry guns but don't have a clue as to what to do if their handgun malfunctions in the heat of battle or when their life is truly in danger, also, many people carry knives on their pockets without ever knowing how to properly deploy or use a knife. Which body part to strike, how to properly manipulate a knife, etc etc many carry items or "weapons" "tactical clothes" "accessories" etc which they don't have the slightest clue about. Of the many combat tours of duty that I performed meanwhile I was in the armed forces, many weapons that were issued to me for the mission were practically brand new, primary weapon, secondary weapon, grenades, target acquisition equipment, GPS, radio communication, etc. Personally, myself or my platoon never had issues with "break in w weapon" we broke them in the battlefield, period.

It takes weeks, months, sometimes years master a "skill" not a few hours in a static gun range, shooting from a bench, shooting without stress being introduced, no shooting techniques, stance, grip, left hand, right hand shooting, shooting while in the move, shooting behind cover or concealment, shooting from different positions, such as kneeling, prone position, combat shooting, many don't know how to properly pace your target before placing a shot on the intended enemy, etc etc etc

Many have the false sense of security that carrying a handgun will give them the ultimate peace of mind, a handgun is a tool, just like a knife, baton, mace, taser, a brick from the floor, rock, bottle, etcetera in order to have some sort of "peace" is knowing that you are properly trained, and you have a "well rounded" game plan. Hand to hand combat is very important, verbal judo or commands, weapons retention and deployment training is extremely important, "Real" combat training or other survival training is important, not just taking a CCW class for a few hours, going to the range "static" that is and placing a few rounds on a paper target which doesn't move, etcetera I'm a people observer, the many times that I have been to a civilian gun range I see so many mistakes, improper gun handling, improper grip, stance, body posture, etc etc that drives me nuts to see because I know that these people don't have a clue and many feel insulted if you try to help them or offer constructive criticism. I don't consider myself the ultimate self defense guru, handgun or firearms guru, or the YouTube commando guru, Internet, forum guru. All I base my experience and knowledge by my training, either from the military, state police academy, state, city and federal training, private training, and lastly how I base my experience from "real world" not the make believe world that so many people talk about. How many people or those that consider themselves guru, been in a actual gun fight, knows that no single human dies the same way when struck by a caliber (bullet) knows that sometimes it takes more than one shot to neutralize your enemy, knows that your enemy maybe also trained, how many have been in combat and knows that different training techniques applies to different scenarios, that when **** hits the fan your game plans needs to change ASAP!

The key that I'm trying to make is that people who decide to carry a personal protection tool wether a knife, handgun, etc need to seek "proper training" in how to use that specific tool. Ok enough of my rant! ;)
 

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I've had my Shield since April 2012. Have over 2200 rounds thru it. This is the first subcompact gun I have ever owned that I LIKE. I shoot it well and love this gun. Shoots like a much larger gun when it comes to recoil.
 

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I was also pleasantly surprised how well I enjoy shooting that little thing. And the trigger on my Shield is much better than my full size M&P. Definitely a keeper.
 

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They are good pistols. My wife carries a 9. It is accurate, and has not had a failure. Much lighter than her Glock 19 too.
 

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I, too, bought one for a backup and concealed carry. Don't have but probably couple hundred rounds through it, but was very impressed with how accurate that little gun is. Favorite small gun I've ever owned. Looking for a holster I can wear with shirt tucked in over it, but haven't decided on one. I also shoot it well with the flush mag which surprised me. I normally don't like guns I can't get my pinky on the grip. My wife carries the M&P Compact 9mm that holds 12 rounds and it's a good shooter also.
 

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chgofirefighter:
Thanks for your concern. I agree with part of what you said, but not all. I see a lot of paper punchers, too, and say more power to 'em as long as they realize the difference between an enjoyable range session and 'operator training'. (I believe Col. Cooper said "Owning a guitar doesn't make you a musician". To paraphrase: anybody can be taught to turn the pegs and get a guitar in tune, it doesn't make them a guitar player. I'd equate punching paper to tuning the guitar in that scenario.) I DO train to clear malfunctions and not only correct stance, grip and posture but also alternative stance, grip and posture.

However I disagree with your disagreement on the X-number of rounds theory. I have to say I don't see anything wrong at all with establishing that a given gun will fire "X-number" (determined by the individual) of failure-free rounds before it is trusted for carry. Yes, if you are properly trained in all that you referenced above you are more likely to prevail in the face of an equipment failure but it seems logical to me that the more "failure free" operation you can document in a given gun, the more likely that gun is to continue operating relatively failure free. I will continue to look for this record of reliability, not for the side benefit of overconfidence or cockyness but for the reality that it is less likely to fail on me when I need it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
chgofirefighter:

Thanks for your concern. I agree with part of what you said, but not all. I see a lot of paper punchers, too, and say more power to 'em as long as they realize the difference between an enjoyable range session and 'operator training'. (I believe Col. Cooper said "Owning a guitar doesn't make you a musician". To paraphrase: anybody can be taught to turn the pegs and get a guitar in tune, it doesn't make them a guitar player. I'd equate punching paper to tuning the guitar in that scenario.) I DO train to clear malfunctions and not only correct stance, grip and posture but also alternative stance, grip and posture.



However I disagree with your disagreement on the X-number of rounds theory. I have to say I don't see anything wrong at all with establishing that a given gun will fire "X-number" (determined by the individual) of failure-free rounds before it is trusted for carry. Yes, if you are properly trained in all that you referenced above you are more likely to prevail in the face of an equipment failure but it seems logical to me that the more "failure free" operation you can document in a given gun, the more likely that gun is to continue operating relatively failure free. I will continue to look for this record of reliability, not for the side benefit of overconfidence or cockyness but for the reality that it is less likely to fail on me when I need it.

If you are worried that your firearm will fail you and you believe that you can't trust that tool then maybe you shouldn't be carrying a handgun. I'm not trying to be disrespectful or cocky. But again, if your weapons fails at "anytime" it's up to you to rapidly but that weapon into battery and back into action. This whole theory that you need X amount of rounds to prove that a handgun is reliable is IMO all BS. Maybe taking your handgun and testing her out, see how she performs, works etc is something that should be done by every firearm owner.

Many guns out in the market don't require "break in period" Glock doesn't, so do many other manufactures. These tools of self defense are made to work right out of the box, of course if you know how to properly handle that specific tool. Again, you can't always depend on a handgun for any situation, the liability issues that comes with improperly using a handgun in a self defense is a questionable one.

You have to have a well rounded game plan, period! If you get disarm during a struggle, knockdown to the ground, stabbed, injured, surprised attack, etc and you can't use your handgun, then what? What other tools can you deploy, use, what is around your surrounding that you can use to neutralize that threat, what vital areas of the body can you strike to temporarily buy you some time to either attack, retreat, disarm or use deadly force. In a life or death situation if your not trained correctly you will panic, make mistakes and quite possible end up dead. It's that simple.

Seems to me that you are overly too worried and you have an over abundance of depency on a handgun, which isn't a bad trait but if you fear that weapon will fail you the. You have to carefully consider other options. Many things provide people with a "false sense of security." Just make sure you don't become the victim and try your best to come out the winner if you ever are face w deadly force situation..
 

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I agree with your points regarding training, readiness and mindset. Maybe I got too "wordy" in my previous response.

All I'm saying is that if I have a gun that has fired 500 or more rounds consecutively without a failure, and another that has a couple failures out of every box of factory ammo, it makes more sense to me to carry the one that has proven to be more reliable.

Thank you for your service.
 

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About 18 years ago, i was suddenly jumped by 6 teen thugs one nite. It happened so fast i was stunned and had no effective response. Now, I am pretty sure if something is about to "go down" my situational awareness is going to be a lot greater. I guess I just never thought something like that could happen in my life. Since then, and even more as i grow older, I am a lot more wary of what can happen out in the world, and don't have the nonchalance i once had. I am working to "carry" with confidence, and while i participate in IDPA for fun and friendship, it has certainly increased my ability to handle my firearm, and clear malfunctions, and "think" about what is in front or behind a threat. I am not paranoid, just more wary at home and when I am out and about. The best way to handle a threat is to not be there in the first place. As far as the above comments about being familiar with one's "carry" protection, i recently sold a fine reliable HK for a DW ECO in .45 because I have become so familiar with 1911 guns, I just couldn't be sure I could employ the HK as surely as a 1911.

Now for a second cup of coffee,

All the best.....
 

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I don't see where wanting to feel confident that a gun will go bang when I want it to means that maybe I depend too heavily on it and maybe shouldn't carry one. I've had all the numerous training classes, shoot uspsa, and feel pretty confident in handling malfunctions. That doesn't mean I want to have to deal with needless malfunctions in a situation where, God forbid, I ever had to pull my carry gun in a life or death situation to protect myself and my family. That applies not only to my carry guns, but also my nightstand and home defense guns. Whereas maybe all guns should work out of the box, they don't always do so. I have had numerous guns of different types that problems developed during the first few hundred rounds that required going back to the manufacturer, or to my local gunsmith if back to the manufacturer was not an option. And then I would put in through the paces again. If I can't fire several hundred rounds through it without malfunctions, I am definitely not going to carry it, or put it in my nightstand, and generally it is going on the auction block (with full disclosure as to the issues I've had with it). I do not want to own or use a gun that is not at least close to 100% reliable. Sometimes it's the particular ammo; or maybe the mags; or whatever; but a lot of times it's because the manufacturer didn't do their job properly in the first place. I've had several guns where the manufacturer told me they just didn't get it setup right in the first place and had to redo the feed ramp or whatever. The bottom line is regardless of whether or not it's just a tool, I want to feel confident my tool will work if I need it to. Otherwise, why have a tool. My dad was a building contractor that I worked summers, etc., with until I got out of college. I can assure you he wasn't going to keep using a table saw, drill, or any other tool he needed to know how to work on and fix whenever he needed to use it.
 
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