1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 167 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,634 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Get it, I can't STAND it........muahahahahahahahaha! The giveaway is going to be a pistol stand made by my son Tanner. I figure everyone can use one of these!
Rules are simple:
1) The entrant must have 50 posts under your belt or more.
2) All entries must be accompanied by some sort of holiday related post. A funny Christmas pic, a impromptu poem, etc. Posts simply stating "I'm in" will not be included in the final drawing, so let's see some creativity here.
3) The drawing will be held this wednesday evening (December 16th) at 8:30 central time zone.
4) AutoMag is not eligible.
5) Multiple entries that meet the above requirements are encouraged! The more funny you come up with, the better your chances!
Pretty easy huh? The winner will receive a pistol stand and only need provide me with a shipping address. I'll pick the actual stand when I get home tonight and put a picture of it up in here.
New get both brain cells moving and let's see some Christmas humor! :rock::biglaugh:
Sarge






P.S. - Just joking on the whole "AutoMag is not eligible" thing. Join in brother! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,048 Posts

Please pick my new dad so I can have something good to chew on Christmas day. Please?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Winner in my opinion !! sorry, couldn't resist.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,055 Posts
Jingle bells, Batman smells, Robin layed an egg, the batmobile lost a wheel, and the joker got away. :confused: All I got.:( can I play?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,634 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Jingle bells, Batman smells, Robin layed an egg, the batmobile lost a wheel, and the joker got away. :confused: All I got.:( can I play?
All the smartassery you perpetrate in this forum, and THAT'S the best you can do? Okay, Charger is in on the sympathy ticket. :barf::biglaugh:
Sarge
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,055 Posts
I just got up.:( I'LL be back. :grumble:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
Well dagnabit (spoken in the best Gabby Hays* accent I can muster), I already done hung up my well worn spurs but I'll be darned if there's a place I can set my shooter. Mmm.... maybe ol' Sarge's youngin's thingamajigbob might find a home here :) It'd be mighty fine on the mantle over the fireplace while a yule log is a burnin'. Toss me in will ya!



MERRY CHRISTMAS TO ALL
...and again Ryan thanks for the generosity.

I've got a couple NIB/ANIB holsters for a Karma giveaway I'm figuring for mid-late January.

* Gabby died in 1969 so unless you're an old codger or a big time old fashion western movie buff you may not know of this classic sidekick :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,401 Posts
I cannot play guys and gals but I want to wish you all a very MERRY CHRISTMAS and a HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!!!:biglaugh::rock:

Gee, I feel so alone and left out!!!!!:bawling::biglaugh:

Good deal Sarge!!! You are a gentleman and a scholar!!!!:rock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,371 Posts
East Tennessee Christmas

1 of 4

East Tennessee Christmas

“East Tennessee Christmas-Calling to me---Hang up the stockings-Light the Tree—Put out the presents-Save one for me---East Tennessee Christmas-Christmas Eve.”

“It might snow-but don’t you know that I don’t care-It’ll be the best of Christmases-If you are there---------So long without you-So much on my own-East Tennessee Christmas-I’m going Home-------.“

Several years ago I bought one of “those generic Nashville Christmas CD’s” and discovered the alluring lyrics quoted above. I buy those CD’s all the time as I love the acoustic instruments and the old mountain tunes and melodies, but this one was somehow special. I knew that I liked it right away, but over the years I’ve finally learned what it has that makes it so special. It somehow defines and encapsulates the memories of growing up in the Mountains of East Tennessee and the Christmas season. East Tennessee is truly a special place and especially in winter.
I read an article in the news paper this morning that philosophized the season as “best when viewed through the eyes of a child”. I would certainly agree to a point; however I view it a little differently as I seem to with most things. You see I do view/remember the season through the eyes of a child, my own. My concepts/impressions of the season is composed of the sights, sounds, smells and feelings of my childhood Christmases (Christmas past, if you will), of the late 50’s and early 60’s. It was really a “season” then that began with Thanksgiving and ended with what was called “Old Christmas” or January 6th. Shortly after Thanksgiving the preparations began with “the making of fruit cakes”. These “fruit cakes” were similar to the type we have today, only homemade and soaked with wine until just before Christmas. I suppose they were the original East Tennessee “coffee cakes”. My mother was exceptionally talented with these and they were superb. Even some folks that didn’t like fruit cake would eat her version. If I can locate the ingredients, I’ll attempt one myself this year. The Christmas shopping began in earnest sometime in early December, as we had a lot of cold and snow in the mountains during that period. It wasn’t like today’s shopping and was mostly about food, with a few small presents for the children. Parents would buy a few things for their small children and that was about it. The first would normally arrive near Thanksgiving and certain areas would often have a covering until February.

more
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,371 Posts
East Tennessee Christmas

2 of 4

The hills and valleys (hollers) of East Tennessee are quite steep and the sun would only reach the valley floor for a few hours per day. The valleys were filled with small streams (branches) that would freeze over for at least a couple of months. Life on a mountain farm was challenging during winter, to say the least, with lots of chores to do and the temperature hovering near (one side or the other) 32f. It seemed to stay just at the point that everything slightly thaw for a few hours around mid-day and otherwise freeze over again. Farm animals have a tendency to get themselves in trouble at the most inconvenient times. Calves and colts were always falling through the ice and getting stuck in the icy water. They’re strong and can often last a couple of hours, but not really very long. We were always listening for the cries of the mothers, especially the older folks, and would use that to locate them. Sound carries a long way in the mountains and you could often hear on for a quarter of a mile or so.
The next phase of preparations would begin during the week preceding Christmas. Decorations would be brought out of storage and the mountains would literally glow with light and color. For an “East Tennessee boy” there is no more beautiful landscape than snow covered mountains dressed for Christmas. Everyone would “go to town” (Knoxville) for the last minute things and believe it or not, Knoxville was awesome in that time/place. We only went a few times each year and the downtown (Gay St.) would really be decked out for Christmas. A day or two before Christmas, preparations for “The Christmas Dinner” would begin with the “Stack Cake”. The stack cake, called fruit cake by the older folks, is a delightful creation of the past with alternate layers of cookie like cake and dried apples. The apples were carefully dried in the sun during late September and October and the cake was made from simple country ingredients (flour, sugar, eggs and vanilla). Stack cakes should age for 24 to 48 hours for the best taste. The next task was a massive cooking of poultry. It seemed that most everything needed boiled chicken and/or chicken broth and it took a lot of chickens. The main course of turkey and/or ham would also be started at this time (Christmas Eve). All the poultry arrived “clucking” and was quite a chore to “convert” to giblets and broth. The ham or pork shoulder had been curing in the smoke house since Thanksgiving. Everyone has what was called a smoke house to cure the meat, but no smoke was actually used. They were small plank buildings with counters and rafters. After the slaughter, the pork was allowed to “chill out” for around 24 hours and then hand trimmed and rubbed carefully with coarse salt. The meat was left on the counter tops, covered in salt for several weeks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,371 Posts
East Tennessee Christmas

3 of 4

After the salt had performed it work the meat was again trimmed, washed, covered with black pepper and hung from the rafters to complete the process. By Christmas Eve all the preparations had been made and everything was ready for “The Christmas Dinner”. Often the adults would visit friends and the children would dwell in the secular side of Christmas (i.e. Santa, reindeer and presents). Everyone’s house was outlined in the familiar colored lights with a wreath on the door, a Christmas tree in the living room, Christmas music playing and lots of treats. Looking back on that, it was quite magical.
Christmas day began with the opening of gifts in pajamas and photographs. Afterwards came the Christmas morning breakfast, a very big production with pancakes, eggs, bacon and/or ham, biscuits and gravy (no traditional mountain breakfast was without biscuits and gravy). By mid-morning “the visits”, as we called them would begin. First it was off to Johnson valley to visit dad’s family. Dad’s brothers and sisters all lived in one mountain valley and would be at the “home place” for lunch. It was always a bit treacherous as getting there on the snowy narrow mountain roads could take quite a while. One Christmas we saw a radio antenna sticking up from the snow beside a turn. Dad stopped and it turned out to be a neighbor’s car completely buried in a drift. We picked them up on down the road a-bit. The old farmhouse would be a frenzy of activity with pies everywhere and the aroma of chicken in the air. The house was heated with one small fireplace in the living room and had no insulation. Everyone would be sitting as close to the fireplace as possible or in the kitchen. The Johnson family was somewhat calm by nature and the visit was quite as I remember. Food was often kept in a small pantry in the kitchen as a refrigerator wasn’t required in the typical Christmas weather. The smells of the house are what I remember most. It always smelled of wood smoke and citrus, Christmas being the only time anyone had oranges and tangerines in the mountains. To this day I connect the aroma of citrus with Christmas. By mid-afternoon we were off to visit my mom’s folks so 35 miles away in Luttrell. My mom’s parents “papaw and mamaw Burnette” were not at all like the Johnson’s. Mamaw was a quite and smiling farm woman that never became irritated over anything and papaw was just the opposite. He was either laughing and cutting up or raising cane over something. The extended family was very large with lots of uncles and aunts in for the holidays from Indiana. They also has large families and often there would be twenty or more kids running around. Mamaw didn’t do pies, but as mentioned earlier she was the cake woman.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,371 Posts
East Tennessee Christmas

4 of 4

The food was always great with dish after dish of excellent country fare. Afterwards we (kids) would run the ridges and blow things up with firecrackers; great fun at the time. After dark, mom’s younger brothers and brothers-in-law would put on the fireworks display. I’m not sure why, but fireworks were always big around Christmas. Religion played a big part of things, but in a different way. We went to church on Sunday, standard in that place/time, but it was somehow different than today. I often tell people this, but I’m not sure they understand. Life was based on Christian values and that’s the way we were raised. People just didn’t refer to it as religions principles; simply as right and wrong. I didn’t really understand the connection until much later in life.
The days between Christmas and New Years Eve were spent visiting relatives and old friends. I really enjoyed these visits as we would travel deep in the mountains to visit nice people in cold mountain shacks. Often we’d walk the last quarter mile or so and the roads (trails) were impassable. We would take small gifts of food, fruit or tobacco. These folks would always have a warm fire or stove and bring out the best they had (i.e. fried apple pies and coffee). I didn’t know these people, but knew they were relatives or old friends of my parents, uncles and aunts. These visits seemed to make everyone very happy and they’d speak of old times and laugh for hours. I try to continue this tradition today, but it’s not really the same.
New Years Eve was the time that the adults would visit close friends or go to adult parties and such. The children would normally watch television and play games. New Year’s Day would start with yet another holiday breakfast and the traditional New Years lunch. No such lunch would be without black-eyed peas, greens and hog jowl. It was a requirement and to the best of my knowledge I’ve had it every New Year’s day of my life. Afterwards the parades and sports stuff would commence; ending with a repeat of the lunch.
Following the day’s celebrations it was usually back to work and school. The old folks would often continue the celebration in a somewhat somber way until January 6th. Mamaw said that was “Old Christmas”… Merry Christmas… Ron
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
529 Posts
Happy holidays from that couple down the block, you know, the ones whose Christmas party you avoid like the plague, the ones you jokingly mention that might be serial killers...









I don't think that Frosty made it to the "nice" list this year, and if this is what you get if you're naughty, I'll never be bad again!







And finally, I think this kid is in the right spirit of things but it's definitely at times like this that life should have a spell checker:biglaugh:

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,063 Posts


******* Reindeer! Now that (explitive deleted) is funny, right there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
235 Posts
Since capitalism is under attack I provide the following.



I'm in if you'll allow me!
 
1 - 20 of 167 Posts
Top