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I'm betting the material- the PD revolvers are Scandium Alloy Frame/Titanium Alloy Cylinder.


edit: I hear "PD" and think revolvers- if not what you meant, just disregard my post
 

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I believe both indicate lightweight frame with aluminum/scandium alloy. http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/...57797_757797_757797_ProductDisplayErrorView_Y

The Gunsite edition was very similar. http://www.smith-wesson.com/webapp/..._766386_-1_757754___ProductDisplayErrorView_Y

In the pre-E Series days, I think S&W had a 5" available with the PD name, though I think most models were Commander length 4.25" models.

I was doing a little research, thinking the SC name was available in the pre-E Series models, but now I'm not so sure. I thought PD & SC were interchanged frequently by S&W. The new models only seem to come with the SC name.

The older models had a firing pin safety designed by Richard Mochack. It was similar to the Swartz firing pin safety designed by Colt in the late 1930's and used by Kimber in their Series II pistols. I don't know, but it is possible those pistols are still available for sale in California. The newer E-Series pistols don't use a firing pin safety, they use a low mass titanium firing pin and a strong firing pin spring to provide drop safety.
 

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I am hardly as knowledgeable as others on here but it seems the SC models have the "fish scale" cocking serrations and they can have the rounded butts (if we are talking 1911's).

I just bought a 1911 Sc.....I'm pretty happy about it. I'll get up a range report ASAP.

I've already ordered leather to carry it.
 

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I am hardly as knowledgeable as others on here but it seems the SC models have the "fish scale" cocking serrations and they can have the rounded butts (if we are talking 1911's).

I just bought a 1911 Sc.....I'm pretty happy about it. I'll get up a range report ASAP.

I've already ordered leather to carry it.
Congrats on the SC I always like the looks of them, looking forward to the range report.
 

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S&W did have the 1911Sc where Sc is the symbol for Scandium, here on an early Commander size pistol they made. The interesting thing is S&W does not have a lock on using Scandium in an Aluminum alloy, they have a patent for how the Scandium is incorporated into the Aluminum alloy. Colt, Kimber, etc. might use it via a different process, or use it and pay S&W a license fee to use the process.



I think the newer "SC" as in the "E" series stands for Scandium Combat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies. I just picked up a S&W1911PD Gunsite and it is very similar to the SC without the "fishscales". It looks like the picture dakota 1911 posted.I am thinking the PD stands for Personal Defense. Great pistol buy the way.
 

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If it's a Gunsite model it would be the gun I linked in my earlier post.

The Gunsite model would originally have a brass bead front sight, and I think plain black rear sight. The SC dakota1911 has would have come with 3 dot sights.

Don't confuse current "fish scale" SC's with the older SC's, like dakota1911's and PD's like your Gunsite model. I wouldn't say one is better than the other, but they are different.
 

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IIRC, the 'Sc' 1911 model designation was used early on. At some point, S&W switched to using the 'PD' designation. This was around the same time they switched from the 'billboard' markings to the smaller markings on the slide.

I have a distributor edition 1911PD 4.25" that is a small marking gun and it was manufactured in April 2006.

The 'PD' models (4.25" and 5") had scandium alloy frames:

S&W 1911 PD Archive
 
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