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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It is my understanding that the sear holds the hammer in place while the hammer is cocked. A thin piece of the sear locks up with a thin piece of the hammer. What happens if either one of these thin pieces of metal breaks? Can either piece break?

I did a search but did not find what I was looking for. Thanks for your help.
 

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A thin piece of the sear locks up with a thin piece of the hammer. What happens if either one of these thin pieces of metal breaks? Can either piece break?

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if it broke while cocked and locked (condition I), the half cock notch would have caught the hammer to prevent AD.
 

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If the sear broke, would the half-cock catch it? I suppose it would, but it might depend on where the sear broke; close to the pivot point, and there might not be anything to catch on the half-cock. If the hammer's full-cock notch(es) broke, the half-cock should catch the hammer. If the gun has a Series 80 firing pin block (or, presumably, the firing pin blocks used by other manufacturers) it wouldn't fire, as even if the hammer hit the firing pin, the latter would be locked in place.
 

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It is my understanding that the sear holds the hammer in place while the hammer is cocked. A thin piece of the sear locks up with a thin piece of the hammer. What happens if either one of these thin pieces of metal breaks? Can either piece break?
They can, but seldom do, considering how many are being used, and how ofren they are cycled.
The design is interesting. There are two hammer hooks, and a wide single sear engagement surface. One hook can break, and the pistol continue working. One corner of the sear can fracture, and the pistol continue working.

A total failure could result in either the pistol firing till the magazine is empty, or the hammer following the slide down, but not with enough force to ignite the primer.

Regular cleaning and inspection of the parts is a good thing, to say the least.
If you note a sudden change in the trigger pull, stop shooting until the reason is found.
edit: Totally forgot the half cock notch. Thanks guys, for mentioning that bit.

Regards,:)
Kurmudgon
 

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They can, but seldom do, considering how many are being used, and how ofren they are cycled.
The design is interesting. There are two hammer hooks, and a wide single sear engagement surface. One hook can break, and the pistol continue working. One corner of the sear can fracture, and the pistol continue working.

A total failure could result in either the pistol firing till the magazine is empty, or the hammer following the slide down, but not with enough force to ignite the primer.

Regular cleaning and inspection of the parts is a good thing, to say the least.
If you note a sudden change in the trigger pull, stop shooting until the reason is found.
edit: Totally forgot the half cock notch. Thanks guys, for mentioning that bit.

Regards,:)
Kurmudgon

Of course a series 80 with firing pin lock would prevent any of that..
 

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Of course a series 80 with firing pin lock would prevent any of that..
:biglaugh:Gotta remember, I'm real old school.:biglaugh:
Would never own one myself. :) So I often forget they exist.

Regards,:)
Kur
 

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If the gun has a Series 80 firing pin block (or, presumably, the firing pin blocks used by other manufacturers) it wouldn't fire, as even if the hammer hit the firing pin, the latter would be locked in place.
This is one of the main reasons I only carry 80 series guns.
 

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I could never understand the reluctance by some to the series 80 firing pin safety. I have a 22 year old Gold Cup series 80 with over 30,000 rounds. I have never had even a hint of a problem with the firing pin safety. Not one..

Recently I had the trigger reworked by Wilsons Combat. Now my trigger is every bit as good as my series 70 Ed Brown..
 

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My dad was retired military. He told me he was on the range training recruits one day and a sear broke. 7 rounds of full auto.

The pistol I have was his and he showed before I ever tinkered with the 1911 what it was and what to look for to avoid that.
 

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My dad was retired military. He told me he was on the range training recruits one day and a sear broke. 7 rounds of full auto.

I think I'll keep my series 80 firing pin safety, thank you very much.. :)
 

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These guys are all right and for the most part don't worry about it nowadays.It's happened before and will surely happen again-with elcheapo parts or some wannabe destroying a hammer leaving only a little nub for a hook after overcutting the crap out of it.Don't believe the myth of an 80 series being incapable of a good trigger also because they don't know how to do it right.Yes you won't get a bullseye trigger but I can pull mine down to 3lbs if I want,and it's very crisp breaking for a carry piece.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for all of the replies. That confirms what I was thinking.
 

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:confused:

Cocked and locked then no. Even if the sear magically disappeared the TS would prevent the hammer from falling.

While shooting? I guess it would depend on what broke and how much. And it would be very likely that if the hammer was completely free from the sear that it would more than likely just follow the slide forward and not have enough energy to make the FP detonate the primer.

OK, that was two minutes I'll never get back.:biglaugh: What a strange thread.
 
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