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Serial no on Browning Hi Power

5489 Views 12 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  nf9648
I am a new member on this site and am thinking about buying a used Browning Hi Power, my first 1911 style gun. I have looked on the internet for information that would tell me something about the gun based on the serial no. 245pzxxxxx but haven't found any info. Can anyone tell me if this is a true Belgium gun? I think it is an 80's model.

Are there any known defects on these particular models with this serial number range?

Any advice on buying this gun would be appreciated. Here is a picture.

I am guessing it is worth about $500. Is this about right?




Thanks,
Bob
deltoro2000
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Hello. The "PZ" in the serial number indicates that it was made in 1981. It is one of the "classic" style Hi Powers albeit with a spur hammer rather than the ring hammer of guns made until circa 1970 or so.

It should say "Made in Belgium" only. I don't believe that the "Assembled in Portugal" came until later, but being only a shooter and not a collector, I cannot say for sure on this, but I think that the "Made in Belgium/Assembled in Portugal" markings first arrived around '88.

The gun came stock with checkered walnut stocks, and the smallish fixed sights common to the Hi Power for many years. It will have the old style "humped" feed ramp. That means that it may balk at feeding some JHP ammunition. If it does, usually Federal 115-gr. JHP or Remington's 115 and 125-gr. JHP's usually feed. (The latter are sold under Remington's "Express" designation and are not the Golden Sabers. I've not tried those in an older gun so I cannot speak to how well that might/might not feed from personal experience.)

This Hi Power has a forged frame and should be a bright polished blue on the frame and slide. I cannot say for sure w/o actually looking at the pistol, but if you prefer the classic style Hi Power, $500 does not seem unreasonable to me. Older versions pre-dating the Mk II and Mk III pistols will only get harder to find over time. For a shooter, I'd still prefer the current Mk III, but other folks prefer the older versions of this classic design.

Good luck and if you purchase the gun please let us know how you like it and share your observations.

Best and welcome to the site.
 

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nf9648 said:
My MKIII .40 was made in 93', so much for being new when I bought it.:mad:
As long as it was unfired, when you bought it, the actual manufacturing year is of little consequence IMHO. After all, its not butter or fresh meat... :)
Just my $ 0,02
Greetings from Old Europe!
Jake C., satisfied HP Mk III (#245NMxxxx, bought in 1991) shooter
 

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Everyone has given you good advice but one point I would like to make (yes I'm being a stickler) it is NOT a 1911 style gun. Yes it is single action and John Browning (take off your hat when you speak the masters name) started the design but there are many differences.

Ed
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
1911 style

As I am fairly new to guns I conceed to your expertise. The information I got was from an article on the net where it does point out similarities and differences.

http://www.handgunsmag.com/featured_handguns/browning_hi_power/

Here is an excerpt:
DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS
Many 1911 adherents view the Hi-Power as Browning's ultimate design, one that simplified the Colt .45 Government Model and corrected what few faults it has. It is certainly true that the Hi-Power does share many of the 1911's characteristics and has a similar appearance.

What are the major differences between the Browning hi power and the 1911?

Bob
 

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Hello. I have read the same thing about the Hi Power being an improvement over the 1911, but I flat don't think that entered Browning's mind. Patent infringement probably did as he had sold the rights to the 1911 to Colt by the time the Hi Power was on the board. It was originally a very different gun than what we have today. John Browning's initial version had an internal striker and the gun was a bit larger. The final touches/changes were made by FAL designer, D. Saive. The Hi Power was completed by him as Mr. Browning passed away before it was completed.

It uses an external hammer, has a thumb safety, two grip panels, and the Browning locking lug approach to locked breech in common with the 1911, but the 1911 uses a swinging link where the HP does not, has an entirely different trigger/firing train as well as a grip safety and removeable bushing.

Same "father" but two very different pistols internally.

Best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
much to learn about guns

Again, thank you for the clarification. As you can tell I have much to learn about guns. I am sure there are some good primers for learning. Can you recommend some learning materials?

Thanks,
Bob
deltoro2000
 
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