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The instructions for disassembly and assembly are different than what I'm used to with other 1911's. Any reason why EB pistols cannot be disassembled/assembled using the traditional method? Hopefully this is not a dumb question!
 

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It doesn't matter

I have taken mine apart about as many ways as there is to take one apart short of breaking something.
I would say do it the way you are most comfortable to safely.
 

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Ditto what Ditto said.

I am not sure what the original poster is referring to, but Ed Brown subscribes to the theory that putting as little stress on the bushing as possible to keep the fit tight. Which means the groups are tight.

This is a reflection of his competition days. On your pistol this won't matter and you won't hurt your pistol in anyway, either way.

But I have to ask, what is the "traditional" way of taking down a 1911? I always start with the slide-stop myself. Never have to worry about a plug flying across a room. Or worse, down range!

But I am special needs. :)

Regards,
Greyson
 

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The Ed Brown disassembly/instructions are bizzare. :scratch:

M1911 disassembly/assembly has been well documented for 100 years and hasn't changed.

I've had my Kobra Carry for years and never read them "instructions" until minutes ago when you questioned them.

First thing out of a M1911 is the recoil spring plug. This relieves all spring pressure internally allowing the slide stop to be removed easily and the slide just "slide" off the front of the pistol.

-- Chuck
 

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On a 1911 with a fairly tight fitting barrel bushing, the first thing out should be the slide stop lever. The reason for this is to minimize any additional potential wear on the barrel and the bushing which occurs when turning the bushing when the barrel is fully locked up. A barrel bushing will have approximately .001 clearance when the barrel is in the locked position. If the slide stop lever is removed first, the slide assy can be removed from the frame as a whole. The recoil spring plug can be removed from the rear and the barrel can be slid forward so one does not have the possibility of creating additional wear at the barrel / bushing interface. Kuhnhausen states in his book that a properly fitted accuracy barrel bushing accounts for approximately 20% of the mechanical accuracy of the 1911. It's a fairly simple way to maintain the tight tolerances that were part of the reason the pistol cost what it did.
 

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Brown 1911s are Browning 1911s with only racing add ons.
Are you asking for field strip or detail strip?
They come all apart if desired, here is my Executive Target.

 

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You forgot to remove the firing pin spring. :cool:
 

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I didn't remove grip bushings, ejector, plunger tube, hammer strut, mag release internals or other small sub assemblies. :)

Push a pin, it all falls apart!
 

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Hound_va said:
On a 1911 with a fairly tight fitting barrel bushing, the first thing out should be the slide stop lever. The reason for this is to minimize any additional potential wear on the barrel and the bushing which occurs when turning the bushing when the barrel is fully locked up. A barrel bushing will have approximately .001 clearance when the barrel is in the locked position. If the slide stop lever is removed first, the slide assy can be removed from the frame as a whole. The recoil spring plug can be removed from the rear and the barrel can be slid forward so one does not have the possibility of creating additional wear at the barrel / bushing interface. Kuhnhausen states in his book that a properly fitted accuracy barrel bushing accounts for approximately 20% of the mechanical accuracy of the 1911. It's a fairly simple way to maintain the tight tolerances that were part of the reason the pistol cost what it did.

Yep. That is what Ed Brown believes.

Now, I must admit I do take a 1911 down this way most of the time. But I look at the need to do this up there with the need to do certain things on NASCAR vehicles. My car in the driveway and the #14 I see on TV have about as much in common as I do with a Delta Force.

Regards,
Greyson
 

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I just wonder if removing the Slide Stop, with all the tension from the recoil spring, does not create accellerated wear on the link and slide stop hole????
 

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You should be able to turn the barrel bushing with your fingers on an Ed Brown carry pistol. I don't see the possibility of "excess wear" on anything that's finger tight.

-- Chuck
 
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