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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Benchmade Skirmish 630, product page here:

http://www.benchmade.com/products/product_detail.aspx?model=630

This was very sharp from the factory, and the edge lasted a long time. However, the time came to sharpen it, and I find that I can't reach that same level of sharpness. Now, I would say that it's sharp enough for most purposes, but I'd prefer something better. On my other knives, I can usually exceed the factory edge by a considerable amount. On this one, I can't. The curved edge, or perhaps the steel (this is my first in S30V) seem to make it tough. I have a Spyderco 204MF Tri-Angle Sharpmaker (with the add-on diamond and ultrafine hones) and a Lansky set.

Any tips?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It seems to be, yes. It seems like the sharpest part of the blade ends up being the back edge of the convex part; or, it seems like that, at least, but that might just be because of the pull of the blade as I test it.

I suppose it might be the metal, not the blade shape. Does S30V require extra work, or a special technique?
 

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I tried using some narrow diamond paddles on my MT Vector, which has a very sharp recurve. You should be sharpening perpendicular to the edge. With the handle there, its almost impossible, so the angle is much steeper and needs more material removed. This is why its not getting as sharp. The skirmish doesn't have a huge recurve, but recurves are much harder to sharpen than straight edges are!

www.japanwoodworker.com has some japanese water stones in slip stone shapes. Round, multi shapes, and you can use coarse sandpaper to sand them to other shapes, I'm going to order some soon. They have some round ones I am thinking of getting for recurved edges. Waterstones work great on S30V and leave a nice, polished edge on the S30V when you go high with them, 4000 to 8000.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, curiously, I've managed to get what I was looking for by increasing the blade angle. On my Spyderco sharpener, I went from the 30 to the 40 degree edge. It's now much sharper. Maybe the edge was just too brittle at 30? Who knows... it's a counterintuitive answer, but there it is. Weird...
 

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Waterstones might work for you; the ones I use for sharpening my chisels must be soaked in water before use and you will need a really high grit # to compare to something like a hard Arkansas stone.

Have you tried any of the ceramic or diamond rods?

Wet-dry sandpaper placed on a smooth, flat glass or granite surface is commonly used to sharpen flat chisels. Use kerosene, very light oil or water to lubricate when sharpening. Perhaps a wine bottle with the sandpaper wrapped around it (use rubber band or tape to hold in place) would have the correct shape for contour of blade. Generally, when using sandpaper, you pull blade backwards, so as to not cut paper. Depending on how dull knife is, start with 200 or 400 grit and finish at 1200 or higher grit.

I use this sandpaper method to sharpen gouges by first using the gouge to make a long, slightly oversized groove in a block of soft wood, and then placing the sand paper in the groove so that when I sharpen it, it doesn't change the contour of the cutting surface of the chisel.



Whelen
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Have you tried any of the ceramic or diamond rods?

Whelen
A diamond rod, followed by ceramics, are what finally worked for me. Now it's shaving sharp, and cuts as well as from the factory. I don't know how well the factory edge can be improved; it was already, "Hey, how sharp is th- OW!!!"-sharp. My brother managed that twice.
 

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This post seems like it's going to be pretty helpful for me too. I just had to sharpen my BM 710 (http://www.benchmade.com/products/product_detail.aspx?model=710) for the first time today. It's D2, and boy did that take a while to get the edge back to cutting shape. I had to hit it with the coarse stone on my Lansky at 30 degrees for quite a while, but the results were great. I skipped the medium and fine stones and went right to the extra-fine white ceramic because I couldn't see very many scratches on the blade face. Everything worked out, except for the recurve area. I just couldn't get the stones to fit in there, but it's still fairly sharp. I might try a shaped waterstone next time, but there is also another option that nobody said before. Benchmade will sharpen your blades back to factory sharp for a $5 fee to cover return shipping. Check out their LifeSharp program on their website.
 

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I just got one of the spyderco sharpmakers b/c my CQC-15 could not be sharpened on a flat stone. Eventhough I read the sharpening angle was 30 I have had much better results with 40. Using the white stones I have it almost shaving sharp. We will see how the edge holds up.

The curve in the blade seems similar to the benchmade.



Happy sharpening.
 
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