1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have one on my Wilson Combat 1996 A2, but only because it came with the gun. I've replaced them at the specified intervals since purchasing it NIB.

I know the shock buffs are suppose to prevent battering of the frame/slide, but what are the negatives? Are they any other pros?

I'm kind of turned off by the fact that I can't slingshot it from slide lock, even though I prefer dropping the slide with my support thumb. Maybe I should just dump the shock buffs. But would that damage my gun? Doesn't sound like any other pistol needs them and the 1911's have been going strong for years otherwise....

TIA
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
JacRyan,

It's not necessary to have shock buffs unless you shoot a few thousand rounds regularly. Even then if you have the proper weight recoil spring for the loads you're shooting you still may not need them.

I have used them in the past and I feel they do offer a bit of protectection against frame battering.

If you want to take them off just do it and don't worry.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
I strongly support their use if - and only if - your guns functions reliably with them. I also recommend the highest weight recoil spring that still allows your gun to feed and eject reliably.

There are no downfalls to using shok-buffs. Proper 1911 form is to always drop the slide with the slide stop. Shok-buffs do deteriorate over time (or they would not be effective - they are designed to wear, so that your frame doesn't!) so make sure you check their condition every time you strip and clean the gun. Unless you're shooting +P loads, the buffs should be lasting at least 750 rds - 1500 rds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
I use them in my Wilson's and believe they do help, of course this is not fact but it helps me to think so. I was very surprised when I changed the recoil spring for the first time in a couple of years and a few thousand rounds. The new recoil spring really made a difference in the "feel" of the gun. So the key is change the shok-buffs and recoil springs once in a while.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
Horsefeathers! Throw them in the can and use the standard (16 lb.) recoil spring! More problems are caused by using heavy recoil springs than are possibly solved. That slide comes forward and cracks around the slide stop hole or fractures the slide stop. IF you're using the gun as a cannon (.460 Rowland, etc.) then the heavier springs are a must. But they also will shorten the gun's life.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
Originally posted by Doug 29:
Horsefeathers! Throw them in the can and use the standard (16 lb.) recoil spring! More problems are caused by using heavy recoil springs than are possibly solved.
My experiences tend to indicate that this is not so. Note that I said above, to use the heaviest spring that still allows the gun to function reliably. A 16 lb. spring will lead to the problems you have indicated if you are consistently shooting hot, or +P loads. It's the slide going back that leads to frame damage. Having a heavier spring adds to the feeding reliability in a gun that is otherwise "timed" and tuned properly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
I was cleaning my gun yesterday after shooting 100 rounds and I examined my shok-buff. It was shredded and within a few rounds the rubber would have been all over the gun. 100 rounds earlier it was in good shape. When it deteriorates it seems to go quick. After what I saw, I would never trust it in a carry gun.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
Originally posted by Howardk:
I was cleaning my gun yesterday after shooting 100 rounds and I examined my shok-buff. It was shredded and within a few rounds the rubber would have been all over the gun. 100 rounds earlier it was in good shape. When it deteriorates it seems to go quick. After what I saw, I would never trust it in a carry gun.
Something's not right here. Shok-buffs are designed to last a little longer than that. What load are you using? Is your recoil spring new, or old and dead?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
On a closely related subject - recoil spring weight. I'd like to know why it seems like a lot of builders immediately recommend using a "heavy-duty" recoil spring?? Unless I intend to shoot "hot" loads, won't the heavier springs prevent the gun from cycling back completely? Or are they just assuming that the spring is going to wear in and in no time it will be back to the original #16 pound weight?
As far as buffs are concerned, you lose the ability to slingshot the slide. While this method may not be desireable for everyday loading, it definitely is desireable in a self-defense reload or clearing drill. I hear that Comonolli? style may be an exception to the above.
-Sparks
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
Originally posted by Sparks:
On a closely related subject - recoil spring weight. I'd like to know why it seems like a lot of builders immediately recommend using a "heavy-duty" recoil spring?? Unless I intend to shoot "hot" loads, won't the heavier springs prevent the gun from cycling back completely
Yes, TOO heavy a spring will prevent proper functioning. The key is to use the heaviest spring possible THAT STILL ALLOWS YOUR GUN TO FUNCTION RELIABLY. This will prevent unneccessary frame battering.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
152 Posts
I use Hydroshock 230 grain loads in my Kimber classic. I beleive it comes with a 16# spring. I have the shock buff installed but am considering taking it out. What # spring would you all recomend for these loads?

Thank you,

K9
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
Originally posted by [email protected]:
I use Hydroshock 230 grain loads in my Kimber classic. I beleive it comes with a 16# spring. I have the shock buff installed but am considering taking it out. What # spring would you all recomend for these loads?

Thank you,

K9
Lots will argue that you have the optimum weight spring in your gun for 230 gr. loads. I can' argue that, but again, increase the spring weight gradually, (try 18# next, then 20#), and see when the gun starts to sputter - then back off one spring weight. Always use the heaviest spring that will allow your gun to function reliably and consistently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Wilson Combat 1911's come from the factory with 18.5 pound recoil spring and Wilson Shock-Buffs. They also say that if your shock buff is not lasting 1,000 (the interval that they suggest replacing it), then it is a problem with the gun such as worn out recoil spring, etc.

My Wilson 1996A2 has been lightly used thus far with most of the rounds coming in the last 6 months since I joined a range in my area. I have replaced my shock buff at 1,000 rounds and it still looked serviceable. It probably could've went another 1,000 rounds, but Wilson recommends replacing that and the recoil spring often and early. They recommend replacing the recoil spring every 2,000 rounds. I'm approaching that mark with my pistol and the recoil spring is still strong.

In the same vein, Wilson touts the springs in their magazines as being extremely durable, saying that you can keep them loaded indefinately (of course, we all know cycling is what causes spring fatigue). My point in saying this is simply that Wilson doesn't seem to be recommending early spring and shock buff replacement to make a mint off of the $5 recoil spring and $2 buffs. They certainly don't recommend changing their mag springs all that often. My guess is they are recommmending this replacement schedule to keep their guns working properly, and keep the owners happy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
k9lupus777,

I also have a Kimber Kustom Classic and use 230gr Hyrashoks.

I use a Wolff variable 18.5lb recoil springs and no shok-buff. Works great for my pistol. I found that with the 16lb my pistol wasn't 100% rliable all th ammo I use. Since moving up to the 18.5lb I've exprienced zero falures. I feel the 18.5 is a good comprimise, it's not to heavy and it's not to light. Though if you plan to use .45 Super or higher you will need a stronger spring.

Also make sure to regularly change the recoil spring when it starts to wear out. You do this by buying two springs and when the one in our pistol is three coils shorter than the new one it's time to replace it.

Hope this helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
I have a Shok Buff and a Wolff 32 lb.
recoil spring (and Wilson 1-piece s.s.
guide rod) in my 1991-A1 for shooting
45 Super. I have only put about 110
Supers through it so far, but it has been
reliable with Wilson 8-round mags and
quite manageable if you keep a firm grip.
Most suprisingly, I was able to feed
200 rounds of standard power and +P .45 ACP
with no malfs in the 8-rounders (including
mixed in the same mag.) I'll keep this
setup until I get some indication of
reliability compromise in my function testing
(it will be a carry gun if it continues to
pass muster.)

[This message has been edited by SELFDEFENSE (edited 04-05-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
My $ .02:

Shok buffs--use them.

Recoil springs--I tend to use the lightest one that I can, not the heaviest. Irregardless, the way to pick a recoil spring, within reason, is to see how the gun returns to target. If the second shot is low, spring is too stiff. If the second shot is high, spring is too weak. With IPSC loads in a 45, a 13 or 14, with a buff, is about right for ME. For shooting lots of carry loads, I would think a 16-17 would be about right. My 45 has 60k+ rounds thru it, can't see where it is damaged in any way........My 40 is done the same way, except I shoot a 12 # spring in that one, and could probably go to an 11# with the 165 power factor. Again, you have to see what works for YOU, with your grip, stance, etc.

I guess all this goes back to what you are doing with the gun. If strictly carry, and you are shooting hot ammo in it, a stiffer spring is required. If an IPSC/IDPA gun, a lighter spring could be used for quicker splits.

I use CP or Heitt buffs. I have seen some other brands that come to pieces in short order. You can get the Heitt buffs real thin, and on some guns, this still allows you to slingshot the slide, if you wish to.

<<<Proper 1911 form is to always drop the slide with the slide stop>>> I musta missed that part in the 1911 book. But then, except on my carry guns, my slide stops don't keep the slide back anyway.......

Rich
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,171 Posts
The advise I have received from Novak's, which has built all of my 1911's over the years, is to use the 18 to 18 1/2 lb. spring. I would suggest the chrome-silicon spring from ISMI. It does not lose its overall length anything like a Wolff does. Every small amount of loss of length, due to use, leads to a reduction in weight. Too heavy a spring will just batter your sear and hammer, thus hurting your trigger job. I have gone away from using buffs, because they reduce slide travel, and don't allow you to pull the slide back to close the gun. The buffs also can get torn up and interfere with the functioning of the gun, unless they are replaced with much greater frequency than must shooters do. Go to IMSI's website for more information on spring rates, heights, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
I hate to show my age, but I've seen .45's, from WWll, that function with the original recoil spring. Also, magazines left loaded for 30 years that feed perfectly. It's not a gun that needs to be babied! And for accuracy, throw a gun together from parts and it would stay within 6 inches at 50 yds.! The "modern" auto's are fawned over if they'll stay inside 2 1/2 inches at 25 yds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
My .02
I tried a shock buff in my Golg match Kimber and it caused repeated malfunctions so no buff there. in my parts box gun there is a shock buff and it made no difference.The kimber also has lightest recoil spring that still alows the gun to function a 13lb variable. This gun also has a slide mounted Dot and is used only for Bullseye shooting and is 100% reliable.it seems to boil down to whatever works for you..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
I carry a Kimber Classic stainless on duty, and replaced the stock spring with a 20 lb, because at the time we were using Federal +P 230 jhp, and it was really pounding the guns. Since then we've switched to standard Hydrashock 230, and it functions perfectly with the 20 lb spring.

Over the years I've used shock buffs, but never liked them because the will come apart if you don't watch them closely. Also, since they do interfere with 'slingshotting' the slide, I was always concerned with recoil spring stacking. Anyway, I don't use 'em.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top