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Discussion Starter #2
I have a Kimber Govt. 1911.

I Would like hear from people that use Shok-Buffs. Do you recommend uisng them? What is your experience with them? Does your gun function well when using them?

If you do use them, which ones are you using and who has the best Shok-Buffs?
 

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I have shock buffs in my full size Colt 1991. They were given to me by George Smith who IS EGW. That's a pretty strong recommendation from one of the best pistolsmiths in the country. Check it at every cleaning, and replace as required. I have a 18.5 recoil spring, and shoot light loads, original buff is still in good shape after over 2000 rounds.
Jack
 
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I use shock buffers in my competition Kimbers and they work well. But don't use them in my carry gun. They work well but are just one more thing to go wrong in a carry gun. Competition yes. Carry no.


[This message has been edited by Jerry (edited 10-14-2001).]
 

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I use CP brand buffs in my Kimber Stainless. They seem to last much longer than the Wilson Shok Buffs in my experience. I agree with Jerry on using them only in competition guns.


good shootin', gf
 

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I have CP Super Tuff buffers in 3 full size 1911's and 2 Kimber Compacts. I use them for range duty and carry. All of them run perfectly. The CP buffs (available from Brownell's) seem to last longer and do not go to pieces like the Wilson's when they are worn out. The one that rides in my carry gun is always carefully inspected and has very few rounds on it. I know there are many who will argue against buffers in a carry gun, but I can't see a good reason to remove it. I like the idea of practicing with the exact same setup that I carry.
 

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18.5# springs in TRS and Kimber. Whichever one I carry doesn't have a buff, the other one is the one I'm shooting at the range, it has just about any brand of shok-buff, and I change them at ~1000-rds.
 

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I use them in my custom target and they cut the muzzel flip in half. The only thing I hate about them is I can't pull the slide back and releace to chamber a round. But they do seem to make it cycle alot smoother. Just keep an eye on them for any damage.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the info on my topic.

I can't seem to find the CP Super Tuff buffers you mention on the Brownells web site. Is that exactly what the product is called, does not come up when I search it.
 

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As others have said you don't want them on your carry gun. If your are in a fight, you want to be able to release a locked-back slide by applying rearward pressure to the slide and not relying on the slide release. Shock-buffs (on some guns) can make this very difficult.

Thunder Ranch actually teaches you to always release a locked-back slide by applying rearward pressure to the slide (whether you are executing an empty reload or clearing malfunctions). This rearward pressure can come from your weak hand, the outside of your thigh, a post, the ground, etc.
 

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A buffer will indeed make the "slingshot" method of releasing the slide difficult or impossible. On a Kimber it cannot be done because of the minimum clearance cut for the slide stop notch. If you train this way a buffer is probably a bad idea, both in your carry gun AND your practice gun (you should practice with what you carry). I personally do not use that method and many instructors do not teach it.
 
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Originally posted by Bastola:
As others have said you don't want them on your carry gun. If your are in a fight, you want to be able to release a locked-back slide by applying rearward pressure to the slide and not relying on the slide release. Shock-buffs (on some guns) can make this very difficult.
Exactly!

Also there is Murphy’s Law. What ever can go worn will go worn and at the worst possible moment. Why add one more possibility for something to go wrong. But to each his own, that’s what makes the world go round.
 

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I don't have a carry gun. It's virtually impossible to get a permit here, but that is another story. I use a local gunsmith's shok buffs in my Kimber Stainless II. Chagned the spring out to a 18.5 as well. Works perfectly fine so far. I noticed the rearward pressure thing when I first put the buff in. I was concerned that I had damaged the pistol somehow. I put it back to stock configuration and it was fine. I figured out that the buff was causing the "problem". Do these things really do what they are supposed to do? Or is this just another gimmick?

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Isn't this the land of the free?

[This message has been edited by BKC45ACP (edited 10-20-2001).]
 

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BC45ACP

As a general rule shock buffs do work, and work well. Though some brands do not hold up as well as others. Experience will tell you which brands work in your pistols. One reason shock buffs are not recommended in a carry pistol, is if they break when you need the psitol most, they can interfere with its operation and keep it from working at all.

On the other hand there is a different question. This question is do shock buffs interfere with the operation of your pistol if they are not broken. The answer to this question lies in which pistol you own and how the slide stop notch is cut.

For Kimber, the answer is YES. Shock buffs will interfere with the proper operation of the slide even if they are not broken. The reason is Kimber cuts the slide stop notch longer than originally designed by J.M. Browning. So with the buff installed, you cannot pull the slide back far enough to drop the release and get the slide to go into battery. You must press the slide stop down to release it. Now the only thing that makes this an issue is most shooting schools teach you to pull the slide back to release it rather than fumble with the slide stop. So this becomes a continuity of training thing. You always want to do certain operations one way.

So if you only have Kimbers, use buffs, and always press the slide stop, then using the buffs is not an issue for you. Though if you have more than one carry (competition) 1911, and use the sling shot method this is an issue. Because one gun works one way and the others work differently.

So the key is to think ahead, and set everything up so it operates the same way.

I hope this helps.


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Str8_Shot

The best handgun for self defense, is the one you have with you.
 

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Str8, I have not noticed that problem with either of my Kimbers. I can pull the slide far enough to the rear to release the slide without any problem. Both Kimbers utilize a .200" Hiett buff. My 9mm SA cannot use that thick of a buff. I use two .090" buffs in it.
 

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i dont know which brand - but i was at the range wit a friend who is a nationally ranked shooter, the guy's been into it forever, and he knows more about guns/1911's than anyone i've ever met. anyway, after no ftf's with wilson mags (300 rounds) - he puts in a buff - constant ftf's - we take it out. problem solved.
 
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