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Optical sights!

I have a red dot on my handgun and will be 100% target focused...5 yards to 25 yards. So I think I won't need to bother with front sight distance.
You didn't mention red dot optics in the OP!

You see through the optical plane where the dot is projected, the target stays in focus. Usually regular distance focus prescription lenses work just fine.

Optical sights and red dot optics don't require corrective lenses except for astigmatism to eliminate "flare"!

All the best in 2020,
 

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I have a red dot on my handgun and will be 100% target focused...5 yards to 25 yards. So I think I won't need to bother with front sight distance.

Pilla or Randolph Engineering would be my top 2.

You didn't mention red dot optics in the OP!

You see through the optical plane where the dot is projected, the target stays in focus. Usually regular distance focus prescription lenses work just fine. Optical sights and red dot optics don't require corrective lenses except for astigmatism to eliminate "flare"!
From Dr. Wong

Normally, the best lens for the red-dot scope viewing will be the best distance prescription. Demonstrate this lens while the patient looks at the red dot while holding out the scope. Because the red dot in the scope is not focused at "optical infinity" (it is closer), try a +0.12 or a +0.25 diopter lens over the best distance prescription to see if the dot becomes even clearer. If possible, judgment would be best if the patient can view at a distance greater than the standard 20 feet and with outdoor lighting. If the dot is distorted, use the phoropter once again to verify cylindrical power and axis as the patient holds the pistol (or scope only) in front of the phoropter. Final results should be demonstrated with trial lenses. If the red dot never becomes clear and round after all lens possibilities have been demonstrated, then a careful determination of ocular health involvement needs to be assessed.

Other articles by Dr. Norman Wong, Precision Pistol Master, Distinguished Pistol, US Navy Marksmanship Team Member, and Optometrist. Geat information worth reading.

Shooting Illustrated - Shooting With Corrective Lenses - 2015 Hyperlink

Shooting Sports USA - Winning Vision Revisited - 2018 Hyperlink

Shooting Sports USA - Eye Dominance - 2011 Hyperlink

Star Reloaders - Ed Hall - Dr. Wong Articles - Hyperlinks

Bullseye Encyclopedia - Dr. Wong Articles - Hyperlink

Fundamentals of Bullseye Pistol Shooting with Brian Zins: Vision - Video Hyperlink

Shooting Sports USA - Iron In The Sun - 2013 - Hyperlink

One more article from another Doctor

https://www.drbarrynolt.com/shooting-glasses/shooting-glasses-for-pistol-rifle-and-archery/

Photo Escape Aperture Ring Kit (Sold on this development)

http://photoescapeinc.com/products/aperture-rings-kit.html
 

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Jayhawk:

From Dr. Wong,

"Normally, the best lens for the red-dot scope viewing will be the best distance prescription. Demonstrate this lens while the patient looks at the red dot while holding out the scope. Because the red dot in the scope is not focused at "optical infinity" (it is closer), try a +0.12 or a +0.25 diopter lens over the best distance prescription to see if the dot becomes even clearer. If possible, judgment would be best if the patient can view at a distance greater than the standard 20 feet and with outdoor lighting. If the dot is distorted, use the phoropter once again to verify cylindrical power and axis as the patient holds the pistol (or scope only) in front of the phoropter. Final results should be demonstrated with trial lenses. If the red dot never becomes clear and round after all lens possibilities have been demonstrated, then a careful determination of ocular health involvement needs to be assessed. "

Almost 25 years ago I was having fits with front sight focus and corrective lenses. Dr. Wong's advice has always been right on. I remembered his advice to be sure to specify the exact depth of field when getting a prescription do to the variations in laboratory methods for general purpose vs. shooters.

In my above post #21 I think I was trying to articulate Dr. Wong's advice but in less technical terms. But as usual you saved the day by providing excellant reference material.

If I was getting distortion I would want to take the above information provided by Dr. Wong with me to my "Eye Doc" so he would know what shooter's need for lens correction with red dot sights (optic sights).

All the best in 2020,
 

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Im 57 and wear contacts. I also wear readers to....read.

My answer for shooting is a pair of Elvex RX500 reader safety glasses in +1.0 power. My normal reading glasses are a +1.75. Due to the front sight being farther away than you would typically read a book, you don't need as much power. And don't worry if your target is a little blurry. That doesn't matter. And what a difference it also makes rummaging thru the range bag, loading mags etc. Try them, their only like $10.00 on amazon.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Im 57 and wear contacts. I also wear readers to....read.

My answer for shooting is a pair of Elvex RX500 reader safety glasses in +1.0 power. My normal reading glasses are a +1.75. Due to the front sight being farther away than you would typically read a book, you don't need as much power. And don't worry if your target is a little blurry. That doesn't matter. And what a difference it also makes rummaging thru the range bag, loading mags etc. Try them, their only like $10.00 on amazon.
How does an 8" black paper target look to your eyes at say 20 or 25 yards? Is it crystal clear? If not, don't you find it hard to get an accurate shot off even if you are front sight focused?
 

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How does an 8" black paper target look to your eyes at say 20 or 25 yards? Is it crystal clear? If not, don't you find it hard to get an accurate shot off even if you are front sight focused?
It would be slightly fuzzy. However, with a front sight focus with young healthy eyes the target is not crystal clear anyway, your front sight is. With iron sights, if your targets in focus you will not be very accurate. I can still manage exceptionally tight groups at 15 to 25 yds with the target a little bit fuzzy. This is a recent target at 15yds. With my Elvex glasses I can still see the white lines. I shoot a bit of USPSA competition as well with them and shoot a lot of Alphas.
 

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I have a red dot on my handgun and will be 100% target focused...5 yards to 25 yards. So I think I won't need to bother with front sight distance.
I just noticed this. Absent from your opening post. My suggestion won't help you. When I shoot an optic, its just with my contacts and clear safety glasses. No extra correction needed.
 

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Bumping (new noob here). Anyone mind explaining the differences between all the "USGI" glasses and those rated as "Z87.1"? Keep seeing two different types of protection ratings and not sure which is best.
 

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I'm right eye dominant so the right lens was set with a focal length based on the distance from my eye to the front sight, with the left lens set for distance.
Same.

I had my optometrist take the measurements (I didn't bring in my pistol, I simply had him get me focused on the tip of my thumb at full extension) and I ordered a pair from ZenniOptical - cost me around $60 (and only that high because I added the sunglass option to it). It's amazing being able to see both the target and the front-sight in crisp focus :)

I don't care about the "In S.D. you'll be using your normal glasses" argument - yes, I'm aware of that, but I still want to shoot my best groups when I'm on the range.
 

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I have been using Wiley-X Sabers with an RX insert for a few years now. What I like is that the RX can be changed out as needed and you can use standard or an elastic band for the rear of the frame (easier under hearing pro's). Downside is that it is another piece of stuff between you and the world.

I have my optometrist give me an RX based upon where I want my eyes to focus. FOr me I have my dominant eye focused on the front sight and the other eye for distance.

I order the RX part online from https://www.sporteyes.com/
I ordered the Wiley-X Advanced after posting few weeks ago, (https://www.rangeoften.com/wiley-x-saber-advanced/) but want to get the RX lenses. Doesn't look like sporteyes has them on there from searching, how do you place an order for the inserts only? Or do you need to purchase the entire setup?
 

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Last complete glasses I bought was about 10 years ago in New Mexico - they had a state program that made the purchase of SAFETY GLASSES seem like they were paying you to buy them - I ended up with 2 pairs of bi-focal Safety Glasses in TITANIUM FRAMES, one with transformer lenses. They are an old fashioned 1940's style with large enough lenses to gather light well - & offer excellent protection. I had trouble seeing rear & front sight + target. To remedy this - I use a gadget I inherited from my father - that is an adjustable aperture device which clips to my glasses frame - & goes in front of my dominant right eye. By looking through the small aperture - sharp details in a greater depth-of-field is achieved (like a camera lens). This works well for me even with vintage military sights.
I have known other shooters to use home made black cardboard devices over the glasses lens they use to shoot - even seen a black electrical tape applied.
Fortunately I do well enough - with no optical help art all in an emergency situation.
But my little family heirloom gadget does help my accuracy - I have no idea who makes or sells these today - but the homemade ones do work also.
 
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