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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Kinda new to pistol shooting but I can hit a bull in the but. I bought a new 1911 and fired about 500 rounds thru it. I was consistently hitting about 3" left and 3" low which is no big deal to me because I was breaking the gun in and getting used to shooting it. It has adjustable sights and I finally adjusted them. I am dead on on the high low but I am still shooting to the left. I don't think it is the guns problem .I think it is my shooting style or lack of. I use a two hand grip with thumbs crossed on the left side. Why am I pulling to the left? Any input will be appreciated.:confused:
 

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my Kimber CII used to hit 2-3" to the left at 15yds until i drifted the sight two clicks to the right. Now i can hit the bullseye consistently off hand.

5 shots slow fire at 15yds off hand
 

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Shooting low and to the left is a sign of jerking the trigger. You are predetermining when the gun is going to fire. Load a snap cap and practice trigger management, following thru after the trigger breaks. You sight acquisition picture should be the same after the trigger breaks as before it breaks. If you do it right with a steady squeeze, the trigger break should actually come as a "surprise."

Hope you found this to be of a useful nature. Not to worry. It is common for most people shooting a new gun for the first couple of times. Dry firing is a great help in learning a new gun.
 

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Consider the current grip recommendation of over 20 years. Let only the tip of the trigger finger to contact the trigger shoe.



LOG
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you log Man. When I shoot I have been using the first joint of my finger. I tried coping they way you are holding the pistol but it feels uncomfortable. I think my fingers are too long.
 

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To much trigger finger, your pushing the shot left and down. Try using the middle of the pad centered on the center of the trigger. Thumbs forward locks your wrist, this is a must do for good recoil control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks 45gunner, I figuered I was jerking the gun but I didn't know how to correct it.
 

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Thank you log Man. When I shoot I have been using the first joint of my finger. I tried coping they way you are holding the pistol but it feels uncomfortable. I think my fingers are too long.
This would be the comment by most trying this for the first time. Do you play golf or tennis and hold how it feels comfortable or use the correct grip which gets comfortable as you get used to it and realize the advantages.

This grip will allow fast follow up and accurate shooting. The left hand is rotated fully forward, by holding in your natural joint lock you have more power over the gun. The thumbs are forward, but are not so much squeezing the gun as they are simply there. Your grip is not overly tight, about the same as if you were driving nails. Takes time to adopt a different style whether it is better or not, I would say your grip is uncomfortable to me also.:)

LOG
 

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You can try the slim grips. It helped me with my Ultra CDP. If you move the sight, I would move the front sight left. Use a brass punch if you don't have the sight clamp and you should not have any damage.

Before anything try working on your grip and finger placement on the trigger. Also have someone else shoot to see if they shoot to the left too. SRM
 

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I've found that, assuming first that the pistol is correctly sighted-in, right-handed folks who shoot slightly left are:

1. Pulling the trigger a little faster than they should - because they don't notice that:
2. They're tapping the muzzle ever-so-slightly to the left by applying most of the pressure on the front right-hand edge of the trigger (as seen from above). ie. too little finger on the trigger (either their fingers are short or the trigger is too long).

As others have said, make sure you're pulling the trigger straight back - not applying pressure at an angle, because that will move the muzzle.
 

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You may find this helpful.

 

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Andy C, thanks for the link

Andy C, thanks for the link to your Iraq pics. I looked at all of the pages. Hope you were well paid for that work.
 

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Thanks 45gunner, I figuered I was jerking the gun but I didn't know how to correct it.
Lots of practice. Plenty of posts here in the forum on how to do so. Heres a couple


1) Don't use the joint. Use the pad of your finger. When you have it in the joint you will want to jerk. This can be overcome, but learning to use the pad of your finger helps in knowing the feel of the trigger (ask any sniper, they file their trigger finger pads to get a little more sensation on the break time).

2) Snap caps. Great to see if the gun moves when pulling the trigger. Also helps with jamming drills, as you will have to clear the snap cap as if there was a malfunction in real life.

3) Dry firing tons. When begining I will tell you that I dry fired tons. I finally overcame the jerking motion, till I went to the range. I found after popping off a few I would go back to jerking. So I decided to suck it up and dry fire in between mags. New people to shooting might give you a hard time with some snickers and weird looks, but the veterans would come over and give me tips as they understood that I wanted to learn to shoot correctly. Wanting to learn to shoot correctly should be your top priority.

4) If you are really new to shooting, a .22 helps tons. I originally started shooting with a 45 and quickly learned that I could not afford that. I went out and bought a ruger MK III 6 months later or so. You will not get the recoil, but you will be able to learn grip, sighting and many other things. I still use the MKIII as I need to work on 25+ yd ranges. Being able to go out and shoot 1k+ rounds in a day or a week is invaluable in moving your distances further and further.
 

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Andy C, thanks for the link to your Iraq pics. I looked at all of the pages. Hope you were well paid for that work.
Thanks for looking. Yes, I was well-compensated but I didn't go there for the money; it was the only way an old fart (by military standards, anyway) like me got to take part in the fight. I'm still pissed they won't let me join the Reserves....
 
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