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Discussion Starter #1
I've got RCBS's dies for making shotshells out of cut down reformed .308 brass, .410 shotshell wads, a dab of #9 shot, and capped with a 00 Buck.
Anybody else out there familier with these loads?

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"Always place your clothes and weapons where you can find them in the dark"
Lazarus Long
 

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I tried my hand at making shot loads with cut off .308 cases years ago. I sharpened the edge of case and cut small overshot and over powder wads from the cardboard off the back of an old tablet and seated them with a pencil. I put a drop or two of Elmer's glue on top to seal things up nicely. I don't recall how much #9 shot I used or what powder combination. They shot good patterns but wouldn't work the action. I had to manually work the action after each shot. The new shot cartridges on the market will work the slide just like a regular slug and work quite well. They are a bit pricey, but I don't shoot that many of them, just when I find a copperhead around camp. Loooks like a .00 buck wouldn't seal things up as I believe it's only .32 cal....unless you put one heck of a crimp on it.
 

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There was a pretty detailed "how to" article in one of the older books, either Handloader's Digest or ABCs of Reloading. I can't remember which one. I'll see if I can dig it out. If I remember correctly, it was a cut down .308 with around 5gn. BE, an overpowder wad, and as much shot as would fill the rest of the case, capped with .429 gas check used for casting .44 mag bullets. The author said slight adjustments in powder charge would allow the action to cycle properly.

Patrick
 

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Old instructions on making .45 shotshells would have assumed lead shot. Anyone have any solid knowledge or informed guesses about using some of the newer shot materials?

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If God didn't want us to own guns, why did He make the 1911?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I wouldnt worry about steel shot in the shotshell loads, but if I was, I'd get the volume right first, then into the scale and guesstimate the powder charge. I dont recommend YOU try this, just that I have.
Jim LEO,
I suspect that our loading techniques and/or tooling is different. My RCBS dies are twofold. One "set" is merely a case forming die, used with an extended shellholder. Run a .308 up into it, cut off w/hacksaw, file flat, inside deburr while in die, pull case out, outside deburr.
The other "set" is a 3 die loading set. The brass profile looks just like the CCI shotshells. I use a 410 shotgun shell wad seated over powder charge with a wooden dowel, trim excess flush with case mouth with sharp knife. In goes the #9 shot. I originally used plastic page protector sheeting, cut much like you did your cardboard. Problem was the rounds weren't very durable. They would cycle the action reliably, but sometimes dump the pellets out,(no glue on mine), so I reduced the shot charge until I could get a single 00 buck in the top to seal it all up. The rounds are now very durable, still cycle the action and with the 00 in there, improve the versatility of the round also. They throw an excellant rabbit size pattern at 25-30 ft., and the 00 is nicely centered.
My only complaint with these loads is that my Glock has a 99% failure rate in setting off the large rifle primers, not enough oomph in the striker. My series 80 Colt is 100% with them.

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"Always place your clothes and weapons where you can find them in the dark"
Lazarus Long
 

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My technique was to cut the case off to proper length, chuck the dase in a drill and use a file to reduce the part of the case where the over-shot card went and use a firm roll crimp. There were no dies available at the time to form cases. I read the procedure in an old American Rifleman magazine back in the early 60's. Quite crude, and I only did it one day when I was bored. they worked fine except wouldn't work the action as stated. As I hadn't much use for them at the time I didn't make any more after the initial batch.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
In the April 1976 issue of The American Rifleman is a detailed article on making these shells with the dies I described. Its called "Handloaded Shotshell for .45 ACP Handgun Hunters", Call them and they'll send you a free reprint of the article. Send me a ten spot and I'll send you some to check out.

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"Always place your clothes and weapons where you can find them in the dark"
Lazarus Long
 
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