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I was at the range today shooting my two LC9 pistols. One is an LC9s with the much lighter striker fired mechanism. The other is the old long trigger pull. After shooting the old LC9 pretty well by staging the hammer, I began shooting the LC9s. It went off early a couple times because I wasn't prepared for the light pull.

This made me think about the self defense guns I have hidden around the house: an M&P 9 in my nightstand, a revolver in a bookcase, a 1911 and LC9s in their hiding places. Most often I carry concealed an LCP.

Should all my self defense guns be the same...or at least similar? In an adrenalin filled emergency or when awakened in the middle of the night, wouldn't it be good to have some practiced or trained muscle memory? Could such a variety of guns be a detriment?
 

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...It went off early a couple times because I wasn't prepared for the light pull...

Think about what you wrote and imagine repeating this in court. There's your answer.
 

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my personal opinion is that a nightstand gun should be a double action revolver. less chances of ftf fte ft whatever or ad.

now to the original question. if you train with all of them a lot then maybe. grabbing an unfamiliar gun in the dead of night is asking for trouble.
 

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In an adrenalin filled emergency or when awakened in the middle of the night, wouldn't it be good to have some practiced or trained muscle memory?

unless you shoot many thousands of rnds per year (regular and often) with the same pistol, I doubt muscle memory will have much effect in an adrenaline dump crisis

the reason it happened at the range for you, was you immediately went from heavy long trigger to shorter lighter trigger


so unless you just finished a few hundred dry fires with heavy long trigger when a goon kicks in your door and you grab the loaded 3.5# trigger'd 1911, i wouldn't be too terribly concerned

Having said that, i certainly wouldn't argue against the virtue of having same pistols for range and defense


..L.T.A.
 

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we see that all the time with competition shooters that practice with plastic guns but compete with a 1911/2011. they draw to fire and are then surprised when the gun doesn't go off, forgetting all about the safety.

the consensus seems to be that you want to train and compete with similar stuff to carry to keep by the bed. I shoot 1911s, and I train to swipe the safety on my way out to the target. it's perfect for shooting a single action, but when I point a GLock or M&P i swipe at a safety that isn't there. that's way better than not working a safety that is.

I think in a stress situation you won't notice a huge difference in anything, as long as it's the same platform. I can't tell the difference between a 4 and 8 pound trigger in a match after the buzzer, but I sure can in practice.

the real secret to not getting the gun to go off when you don't want it to is to keep your booger flicker off the bang switch. nothing else, not even a DA revolver will make up for poor trigger control or not following the rules.
 

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"Beware of the one gun man. He probably knows how to use it." :eek:

Old advice and just nonsense. Name of the game is to have lots
of different guns and be neither competent with nor the master of
any of them. :rock:
 

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If you are having unintended discharges when you go from one handgun to another, you might want to consider selling all but one and using that one for everything.

I have never had such a problem. I am taking 7 different firearms to the range in a few minutes and can almost guarantee that all my shots will go off when I want them to do so.
 

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I like variety, therefore I have several "range toys".
But I only have one firearm for EDC (a 1911) & one for "that bump in the night" (G21).

I've carried & trained with a 1911 since I started carrying a pistol (30+years).
I dry fire it everyday, about an hours worth.
For live fire practice, I use a buzzer for the "adrenaline dump". Gun come out of the holster, the safety is swiped off but my finger stays off the trigger until I'm "on target".

This routine is also the same I use when practicing with the G21. And yes, my thumb sweeps the safety that isn't there but, that's OK.
And the heavier trigger with the G isn't an issue.
 

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There's no universal right answer. More types of firearms means more stuff to learn. Some folks find it easier to do than others, but it is far from unattainable for most hobbyists.
 

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You should be competent with whatever you chose to carry.

Having a "carry rotation" is just handgun masturbation.
Pick a gun, become competent, carry it.
 

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I use Glock pistols for EDC, I have all the triggers set up the same, I also do that with the sights.

I don't know that doing so is necessary, but I figure it can't hurt.
 

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I standardized on one platform for defensive use to maintain consistent training. I use a P30 for full size, P200SK for compact, all in 9mm with LEM trigger and even the same sights.
 

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Cops deal with dirtbags every day. Gangbangers, wife-beaters, thieves, tweakers, crackheads, & assorted violent baddies of all flavors.

They aren't easily rattled by confrontational situations. It's just a part of their ordinary work week.

Yet in police shootings, there's statistically a lot of rounds fired by officers for every hit (if there ARE any hits)

The point is that (IMO) the emotional aspect of gunfighting is probably more important than the technical: Keeping your cool.

& if cops (who deal with human crap daily) choke in a fight, I don't expect a Regular Joe to do better.

The Police---even with years on the job-- seem to point at center-of-mass & dump the mag.

So I think that the idea of careful shot-placement, with smooth trigger pulls, & eyes focused on the front sight, is a bit outside of reality.

I'm thinking that sights won't be seen at all. Trigger yanked, & eyes will be on the maniac.

Like how the cops do it. I wager all the "sight picture" stuff goes out the window pretty quick.

& thus, I think slight variances between the feel of guns will not factor in at all.

My range practice is for sport/fun & I enjoy the challenge of tight-grouping at distance.

But my Defense Practice is a full mag emptied fast at 15 feet. I would hope to do, maybe, half as well in a pinch.
 

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It's just what works for you.

I've never happy with my performance when I try to stay proficient with more than one type of handgun at a time.
 

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Personally I'm not too keen on leaving guns hidden throughout the house. They may be hidden to you, but not a smart burglar. A better option would be to always have your CCW on you, even when at home. I always have at the very least my little NAA mini-revolver in my pocket at all times, or better yet my Kahr P380. If nothing else I can get the creeps to retreat long enough for me to run and get my shotgun.
 

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I have many guns but my Colt Commander that I carry is generally under my armpit or my pillow. I also have a Kahr P9 that I carry when the Colt doesn't work for the situation. I may take several guns to the range every week but I always take my main carry (Colt) and often my backup (Kahr) and shoot a couple mags at least through them, then clean, inspect, lube afterwards. I don't hide guns around the house either.
 

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Cops deal with dirtbags every day. Gangbangers, wife-beaters, thieves, tweakers, crackheads, & assorted violent baddies of all flavors.

They aren't easily rattled by confrontational situations. It's just a part of their ordinary work week.

Yet in police shootings, there's statistically a lot of rounds fired by officers for every hit (if there ARE any hits)

The point is that (IMO) the emotional aspect of gunfighting is probably more important than the technical: Keeping your cool.

& if cops (who deal with human crap daily) choke in a fight, I don't expect a Regular Joe to do better.

The Police---even with years on the job-- seem to point at center-of-mass & dump the mag.

So I think that the idea of careful shot-placement, with smooth trigger pulls, & eyes focused on the front sight, is a bit outside of reality.

I'm thinking that sights won't be seen at all. Trigger yanked, & eyes will be on the maniac.

Like how the cops do it. I wager all the "sight picture" stuff goes out the window pretty quick.

& thus, I think slight variances between the feel of guns will not factor in at all.

My range practice is for sport/fun & I enjoy the challenge of tight-grouping at distance.

But my Defense Practice is a full mag emptied fast at 15 feet. I would hope to do, maybe, half as well in a pinch.
Bob Stasch is a Chicago PD officer who has killed 5 and wounded 9 in 14 gunfights. Says he's never seen his sights according to interview posted on The Firearms Blog.

One revolver guru/trainer wrote to me that even a very, very well known gun writer/trainer was stunned by Stasch's comments.
 

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I believe it. When one might be KILLED in the next half second I doubt your lessons at the range mean much. Point & bangbangbangbangbangbang is probably what will happen.
 
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