1911Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I got a sig arms GSR yesterday one of those things I did not need but I just ad to help the economey. Its used paid 600 for it has very little wear. I have a P226, P229 , P232 and a Sig 556. Now the big question so what should I expect with this one I just got?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
Alecat-first of all, congratulations. The GSR is an excellent 1911, but here are some "care and feeding" tips that you might find helpful.

First, regarding lubrication. The slide and receiver are both stainless, so SIG recommends that you use TW25B as a general purpose lube/grease on GSR's. I've found it to be excellent, but others prefer Brian Enos' SlideGlide, or some of Wilson's various lubes. The reality is that regardless what you choose, your're dealing with a 1911 pattern pistol, so ensure that it's well (and continuously) lubed. A higher viscosity lube like TW25B will remain in place longer to do its job.

Second, determine what it is that you've got-if it's a "first generation" GSR, the frontstrap will have serrations instead of checkering-that means that the slide and receiver were made by Caspian, and the barrel by Storm Lake. "Second generation" GSR's have frontstrap checkering; SIGARMS themselves manufactured the slides and receivers, and some of the other small parts that had previously been purchased from various high-end vendors.

There were some fit issues on some, but by no means all, first gen GSR's-some suffered from hammer lean and a walking extractor pin, and some of the rear sights were so tightly fitted into their dovetail that metal was actually galled in the installation process. The "manhole cover" on the right side of the slide (which is a access port for the firing pin safety mechanism's parts) was supposed to be secured with red locktite at the factory-but some escaped without it being done. If yours is loose, carefully remove it, apply red locktite to the screw threads on the hatch cover itself (NOT to the internals of the slide, or the threads on the slide per se), and resecure the cover using a #4 spanner bit that you can get from a hardware store. Let it dry for 24 hours before using the gun. Otherwise, there were some receivers that were apparently victims of dimensional irregularities as produced from Caspian which produced some functioning problems-but I don't mean to scare you away from yours if it is a "first gen" gun-most were excellent pieces, with highly satisfied users.

On "second gen" GSR's, the thing to be aware of is that the rear sight was merely "slip fitted" (that is, loosly fit into the dovetail, with the retaining setscrew barely tight enough to retain it in place). The idea was to allow the shooter to determine his or her zero, and then apply blue locktite to the setscrew and tighten the sucker down. The problem was that SIG kinda forgot to tell anyone about this, so shooters raised all kinds of hell regarding loose and falling out rear sights...so when you go to the range, make sure that you have the right hex bit to first tighten, and then loosen/adjust and finally secure it after locktiting.

Although you'll encounter all sorts of interesting, and byte-consuming blogs as to whether ot not any pistol really needs to be broken in, the reality is, IMHO, that with a GSR (and probably most 1911-pattern guns) is that you should anticipate a 500 round break-in/parts melding/problem diagnosis period. Mine took about 400 rounds before operational hiccups were eradicated. After the 500 round break-in shooting is (successfully) completed, I'd strongly recommend running a box or so of your carry ammunition of choice through the gun, to confirm both functionality and zero. The reality is that the GSR is a tough, reliable 1911-but its a fairly tightly-fitted one, and the trade-off is that some break in will probably be necessary. Inexpensive ammunition is just fine, like Winchester 100 round 230gr Range/Target ammo found at Wal-Mart. I'd clean it every 100 rounds, personally, during this initial shakedown. After this period, if you're encountering any problems, call SIG's Customer Service, describe the problems, and ask for a RMA (Return Merchandise Authorization) and a shipping label-SIG has been outstanding in their support of the GSRs.

Magazines that were initially issued with both "first gen" and (initially) early "second gen" GSR's were ACT/Novak nickel-finished 8 round magazines. There are two potential problems with them: First, if you eject 'em on cement, or a hard surface, I've heard from a very reputable source that the polymer baseplate would shatter, inducing a "speed unload" (if there were any rounds remaining)and making the magazine non-functional until the baseplate was replaced. Second, apparently fairly large numbers of these magazines suffered from overhardening, particularly in the vicinity of their feed lips, and it was fairly common for feedlip cracks to develop, usually on the back face of the right feedlip. The magazines usually continue to function just fine (I use my cracked ones to hold my practice snapcaps), but I have a friend whose Nighthawk (yes, Nighthawk issued the same ACT/Novak magazines) was rendered temporarily unusable during a match when the feedlip crack spread, and a portion of the feedlip fell off and seized up his gun. SIG is great about immediately replacing any such flawed mags (as are Novak and PSI{the US importer of the ACT/Novak mags}); SIG eventually switched magazine vendors to Checkmate. I'm currently testing Checkmate's "Hybrid" 8 round magazines, with their dimpled and skirted follower, along with my 3 good Novak mags. The good news about the feed lip cracks is that if they're going to develop, they usually do so very early on in their use. If they don't crack initially, they usually don't appear to over time.

Since yours is a pre-owned GSR, unless it's a SIG CPO gun, as a matter of course I'd recommend replacing your recoil spring as preventive maintenance. The 5" GSR's run with a 18.5 lb spring; I'd recommend Wolff or IMSI (my experience has been limited to Wolff, and I've been highly pleased with their springs, but I've also heard good things about IMSI springs on numerious 1911 sites).

I hope that this has helped-let us know how things go with your GSR, and please ask us any questions that come up.

Best, Jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Thanks for the information Jon. I have two unfired GSRs and will certainly refer to your post again before shooting them..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
804 Posts
Glad it helped, guys. I'm certainly not anywhere close to Matt McLearn or Bruce Gray regarding the GSRs, but I enjoy mine and am happy to pass on what I've experienced in the hope that it's helpful to others, and their use and appreciation with what I regard as one of the best 1911-pattern pistol values on the market. I'm sure others will chime in with other tips as well.

Best, Jon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input I took it to the range yesterday only put 50 threw it, shot great but I did have two FTF on the last round in the magazine. One occured with the factory magazine that came with it, the other was with a new wilson magazine. The recoil spring does seem worn so I'll will order a spring set this week if work picks up. I'll post a pic soon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Thanks for the input I took it to the range yesterday only put 50 threw it, shot great but I did have two FTF on the last round in the magazine. One occured with the factory magazine that came with it, the other was with a new wilson magazine. The recoil spring does seem worn so I'll will order a spring set this week if work picks up. I'll post a pic soon
Im having the same problem with mine (new w/only 200 rounds through it). It consistantly jams on the last round, even with the new Wilson Combat mags.

New recoil spring?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
On "second gen" GSR's, the thing to be aware of is that the rear sight was merely "slip fitted" (that is, loosly fit into the dovetail, with the retaining setscrew barely tight enough to retain it in place). The idea was to allow the shooter to determine his or her zero, and then apply blue locktite to the setscrew and tighten the sucker down. The problem was that SIG kinda forgot to tell anyone about this, so shooters raised all kinds of hell regarding loose and falling out rear sights...so when you go to the range, make sure that you have the right hex bit to first tighten, and then loosen/adjust and finally secure it after locktiting.


Best, Jon
It sure would have been nice to know that before I took my GSR to the range for the first time. I noticed my groups opening up to the left as I went through several mags, and then after a mag change, I noticed my rear sight had fallen off! After I got home, I centered the sight, applied LockTite, and the problem was solved. After that initial problem, mine has been trouble free this past year and a half.

Anyway, here's my reverse two-tone GSR Revo. I've been told by Sig it's one of 75 they produced.

 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top