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I thought it might be interesting for some of the shooters here to re-create what kind of sight picture they get as they raise their gun to eye level. You've drawn and are looking at your target. What steps do your eyes go through at this point, and what do you see?

When does your vision switch from target to front site?

When do you pick up the rear sight, then front sight?

What do you see when you're focused on the front sight?

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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1.When the pistol comes to eye level
2.What is a rear sight?
3.1 green dot
This is, ofcourse a draw and shoot scenario not slow aimed shots
 

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A lot of that depends on the range of the engagement you are talking about. If it's at 5 yards or under, I would probally draw and shoot from retention, presuming ther is a need to do so in that manner. Otherwise, it's all muscle memory out to about 12 yards. If I am drawing a pistol, and aiming at the target, I focus on the target until the pistol comes to eye level, then reassure myself my sights are where they are supposed to be. If it's a draw and shoot scenario, once again, muscle memory, a flash sight picture, and bang.

Steve
 

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<><> When the pistol comes up to eye level, I see the front sight, which goes on target. The rear sight sub-consciously aligns itself. As I press the trigger, I am focusing on the front sight, with the target behind it.

Raspy
 

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If I do it right, I pick up the front sight as I'm moving the gun forward. Stay focused on front sight, and the muscle memory kind of brings the rear sight where it needs to be. I'm guessing that the alignment happens subconciously. (All of this while yelling my head off to "Stop" and "Drop the weapon".) If it's dim, I see a green dot, if not, just a dot and sight serrations.

If I'm trying really hard to make a super fast draw, I bring the gun up lightning fast, get a good hard focus on the REAR sight, slap the trigger really hard, and watch the bullet go into the ground low and left of the target. Then I look in amazement at the timer and see I was even a tenth of a second slower than my slow smooth draw that centered the target.
 

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As GM45 said, seeing the front sight as gun is being pushed forward. Lock onto front sight, never take eyes off front sight. It is surprising how much you can still "see" while focused on the front sight. Distance dictates how much time is allowed to center front sight in rear before firing.

Steve
 
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