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In my owners manual for my S&W Pro Series 9mm 1911 and in all of my other owners manuals, it is called a slide stop. In the manual they tell you in order to release the slide to pull the slide back, push down the slide lock and let the slide go home. They do not tell you not to release the slide with the lever but they never say it is not OK to do so.

I have had just as many friends, gun smiths and sales clerks tell me it is ok to release with the slide stop as those telling me it will damage the gun.

Do any of you have a gun that the manufacture actually states in the manual that is ok to release the slide with the "slide stop"?
 

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This one has been beat to death. When I shoot SS, I'm using the lever to drop the slide at the reload, if I'm empty.
 

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That's the way they taught us in the Army. It's a slide stop, NOT A SLIDE RELEASE!

I heard because using it to release the slide will cause unnecessary wear on the slide, at the notch, than sling shotting it.
 

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That's the way they taught us in the Army. It's a slide stop, NOT A SLIDE RELEASE!

I heard because using it to release the slide will cause unnecessary wear on the slide, at the notch, than sling shotting it.

I've got a Trojan with over 40K on it that would argue with you.;)

And I was told the Colt drawings called it a slide release.

bottom line: if you have to get your pistol back into action fast, the slide release is the way to go.
 

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It has to stop before it can release.
 

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OP you will have better luck finding out which came first the chicken or the egg.The slide stop/slide release argument will never be resolved.Both have merit it's up to you to figure out which you preferr.
 

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I've got a Trojan with over 40K on it that would argue with you.;)

And I was told the Colt drawings called it a slide release.

bottom line: if you have to get your pistol back into action fast, the slide release is the way to go.

Here, have your Trojan argue with Colt.

http://www.coltsmfg.com/ShopOnline/tabid/62/CatID/10/Government_Model.aspx

I'm just saying what my Drill Sargent told us. I would never tell him he was wrong to his face even though I knew he was upon occasion. :biglaugh:
 

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I never understood the idea of slingshotting during a fast reload. I shove the mag in while the slide is locked back and with the same support hand I thumb down the lock that is now a release and the slide goes home as my support hand settles into place wrapped over my firing hand and I'm firing again. Why would I want to take extra time and reverse the direction of my support hand to slingshot or overhand the slide then reverse it again to travel back down the support position?

Range sessions at Ft. Bragg and Ft. Wainwright with the 1911A1 we used the slide release. As did most folks I shot around back then. You only used the slingshot or pulled on the slide while pressing down the stop/release if your gun was too tight and wouldn't drop the slide with just the release. In which case you should probably get that checked out. Then again we were running stock guns with maybe a little personalization and most of them weren't just range toys. Even if they only got out to see the range the guns were expected to be fully capable as working guns.

These days if you can shoot enough ammo to get your 1911 to the point that the notch in the slide is wearing to the point of real concern on a fighting gun then you can afford to and should be replacing parts prior to failure points and doing routine inspections of your firearm.

If you have a range toy, which it appears to be what a whole lot of 1911 guys seem to have, then by all means, slingshot, overhand, pull back while pressing the lock down, and whatever else you need to do to baby your little range queen.

I've had a few pretty worn 1911s and shot even more worn ones in Army and never had one fail because of the slide release wearing the notch in the slide to far. Not saying it hasn't or can't happen. I'm just thinking it would take an extreme number slide lock and release operations to achieve that. If it happens on a gun soon the there is an issue with the gun, metallurgy, tolerances, etc.. If it happens on the extreme end the the parts are reaching the end of their service life.

Just because guns will run to extremely high round and cycle counts without parts replacement doesn't mean they are expected to. The downside of all the Glock worshiper's and writer's "Torture Tests" is that they start to create this idea that defensive firearms are expected to run 100% under all and any extreme conditions to include unlubed and without any cleaning ever for extreme round counts. Hmm. Sounds a little like the hype and bad info provided when the M16 was first introduced. "You never have to clean it!" So much BS that the first M16s were issued without cleaning kits. We know how well that turned out.

Seriously, call it what you want or whatever the parts chart for your particular gun calls it. If you can run a gun enough to the failure point of one method over the other great for you. I also envy/despise/strongly dislike/make nasty faces at you, for being able to afford to shoot that much ammo, even if you are reloading. ;)

I'm with the guys that say, "When it locks the slide back (stops), it's a lock (stop). When I press it and it releases the slide, it's a release."

Most parts list I see for the AR-15 call the similar device a Bolt Catch. Yet we were taught in the Army and I see most people pressing the button on the same device to release the bolt carrier to free it to strip a round off a fresh magazine and drive it all home. And yes, if you Google it there are actually threads agonizing over using the bolt catch vs using the charging handle. Personally, if the BCG is forward I use the charging handle. If the bolt is locked back I use the bolt catch unless my hand is closer to the charging handle at the moment. Whatever is closest to get the job done in the fasted amount of time and with the least hand movement. I shoot southpaw on long arms so that does come into play.

I will admit that there is a time when I'll overhand a semi-auto handgun. If shooting left handed and the gun only has a right handed slide release then I'll rack the slide on a fresh mag from slide lock. Closer, faster, that's what matters to me.

P.S. You might also consider that such parts might be named for the first function they provide. It doesn't mean they don't have a second function. It just means the first they they usually do with no interaction from the individual is stop the slide. They also release the slide, but that comes after the slide is locked back by said device. You can't release it if it isn't locked back. And doesn't a slide being slammed into a piece of metal suddenly shoved up into a notch in the slide going to take some abuse by that very action? I would think that metal being slammed into metal is much harder on the notch that simply rubbing metal against metal. Then again, I'm old and cranky and got my cynicism the old fashioned way, experience.
 

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Most parts list I see for the AR-15 call the similar device a Bolt Catch. Yet we were taught in the Army and I see most people pressing the button on the same device to release the bolt carrier to free it to strip a round off a fresh magazine and drive it all home. .
X2

Yes it says slide stop on the parts list but it's just named for its primary function, it's not going to list any other function. Hell, JMB could have name it a flux capacitor, but it has nothing to do with its functions.


Now I think we need to move on and have a grease vs oil thread.
 

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.... pulled on the slide while pressing down the stop/release if your gun was too tight and wouldn't drop the slide with just the release.....



then by all means, slingshot, overhand, pull back while pressing the lock down, and whatever else you need to do to baby your little range queen.....
On my 1911s you do not need to depress the slide stop with a loaded magazine.
 

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With a loaded magazine inserted you do not need to depress the slide stop.
Unless of course your gun has a problem which I alluded to. I was being a bit of smart$ss too.

Now I think we need to move on and have a grease vs oil thread.
I'm still torn between greasy oil and oily grease combos myself. I think we need to really delve into that.
 

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Since we have this resolved, next completely useless question that has no right or wrong answer...

My car owner manual doesn't specifically say I can or can't do the following.. so when you drive are you used to do it one handed, 10 o'clock - 2 o'clock, with your knees...
 

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In my owners manual for my S&W Pro Series 9mm 1911 and in all of my other owners manuals, it is called a slide stop. In the manual they tell you in order to release the slide to pull the slide back, push down the slide lock and let the slide go home. They do not tell you not to release the slide with the lever but they never say it is not OK to do so.

I have had just as many friends, gun smiths and sales clerks tell me it is ok to release with the slide stop as those telling me it will damage the gun.
I think we're mixing our concerns. There is no problem with using the slide stop as a slide release, and vice versa. But, you should not "let the slide go home", on the fly, if you are not loading the gun. Allowing the slide to slam shut on an empty chamber excessively wears the gun.
If you are loading the gun, you absolutely should let the slide fly home, not resisting it in any way. If you are lowering the slide on an empty gun, you should ride the slide down rather than allowing it to fly home.
Some believe that the gun operates more reliably when the slide is fully retracted to load, as you get an additional half-inch of acceleration on the feed stroke compared to dropping the slide with the slide release, and there may be something to that, but I've never actually noticed any difference with any of my guns.
 

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Just sayin,

For you guys, where these types of questions really cause you heart burn, you could just ignore them, just sayin. Eventually everything in the world pertaining to this type of pistol will have been discussed here and there will be no need for any discussion and/or input, even if your input is "it really doesn't matter". If someone isn't sure about something I guess we should just tell them "go away" if it's been discussed here sometime in the last ten, twelve years.
 

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Last week I was on the range with a buddy of mine. This was the first time that we had shot together. I was using the slide stop release thingy to release the slide during reloads. My buddy asked me why I was doing it that way. I simply replied, "Because I know how to do it that way." He said, "Ok." We kept shooting. Amazingly, we're still friends. Even if he is a REVOLVER guy! :rofl:
 

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With my Kahr P380 if you don't use the slide stop you can't even chamber a round. The slingshot method doesn't work, as the round simply stops against the feed ramp. Strange, but that's the way it is.
 
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