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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question for those of you familiar with issues concerning those of us with small hands. My palm size is average, my finger length however is not. My question is this. Is it worth the nearly $300.00 to send my tac pro II into Kimber for the small hands package? Or would a pair of alumagrips and a shorter trigger do the job? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The small hands package is an option the custom shop offers. I believe it is a combination of a short trigger, thin grips, and a different grip safety.
 

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Seems to me that there is nothing to lose by putting some thin grips on yourself as a first step. If that solves the problem you get off cheap and don't have to be without your pistol. If you still have to send it in they aren't going to charge you for something you already have done. The thin grips aren't going to mate flush with your extended mag well but that's kind of a superfluous part anyway imho.

Chip McCormick makes some nice slim grips in rosewood for Gov't and Officers models.


clic pic
 

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rgillis

I agree with the recommendations to change the grips your self. Its easy, all you need to do is remove the grips and the bushings from the frame. The Chip McCormick thin grips come with replacement screws (I think) to fit into the frame holes. Also, if you are experienced in doing a detailed disassembly I suggest you also install a short trigger. If you are not experienced buy a Lyman drift set and Bill Wilson's book on maintaining the 1911. The drift set will cost about $20, and the book about $10. The book is very well written, dispite the fact it really plugs Wilson products, and includes a lot of good photos to show you what to do.

Considering that the grips and the new trigger will cost about $30 each, everything totaled together will cost you about $100. Plus you will know more than when you started, which is an added benefit.

I hope this helps.
Str8_Shot
 

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If you're going to change the bushings yourself, it will make your life easier if you get the special screwdriver bits that Brownells sells for that purpose. You'll need one for both the standard bushings and the "thin," unless you don't want to preserve the standard bushings (then you can use vise grips or whatever).

Another thing is that some manufacturers stake their bushings, so they may be challenging (to say the least) to remove. It may be impossible to get them out without damaging them beyond repair, but then that may be unimportant.

Fortunately Kimber uses a thread locking substance and they're not too tough to remove.

Also, a good source for short triggers is your friendly local gunsmith. They usually have a box of them that they've taken from older Colts and Springfields where people wanted fancier or longer triggers. You may be able to get 'em for free in fact.
 

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Str8_Shot said:
The Chip McCormick thin grips come with replacement screws (I think) to fit into the frame holes. Also, if you are experienced in doing a detailed disassembly I suggest you also install a short trigger. If you are not experienced buy a Lyman drift set and Bill Wilson's book on maintaining the 1911. The drift set will cost about $20, and the book about $10. The book is very well written, dispite the fact it really plugs Wilson products, and includes a lot of good photos to show you what to do.
Yep they do come with the shorter screws and bushings and you can choose between stainless or blued screws. It also comes with the torx tool for the screws.

I've done this on two Kimber CDPs and it was easy. I used a dab of red loctite on the bushings and blue (removable) loctite on the screws. When you put the screws in start off by putting them in just slightly snug. The loctite should hold them in place and this will prevent you from cracking the wood and from causing the screws from protruding too far into the magwell which will impede the magazines smooth travel in and out.
 
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