1911Forum banner
1 - 20 of 154 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,251 Posts
Yeah, good luck with that. I don't expect those will be flying off the shelves. I expect some investor is about to learn a very expensive lesson in understanding the market.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
The more complicated you make a thing, the more problems you introduce. Firearms by their very nature require being fairly simple, because the last thing anyone wants is something unreliable that spends more time in the shop than it does in operational order. Or something that can be hacked and prevented from functioning when needed. I feel like 'smart' guns are what happens when people that don't own or use guns decide they know enough to 'improve' the product. I suppose we'll have to watch and see how well they sell...I imagine many of them will just be taking up space on shelves and collecting dust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,121 Posts
Making money with a small business— any business for that matter — is tough enough when you have a good product/service to sell.

And here, we do not have a good product. The only people touting this product are those who don’t buy the product in the first place; they just like to tell others what to do, as in “rules for thee, but not for me”.

There will be some initial sales to collectors of curio firearms, maybe also curio tech devices.

Hopefully, none of these folks, many ignorant of basic firearms safety rules, will shoot themselves or others trying to test the device; now that would be really bad advertising for a supposed “smart gun”.

Beyond the curio sales, future bankruptcy is predictable. Business School Intro. 101.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Levian

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,003 Posts
No thanks. A hard pass for me. Too many things to go wrong. There has to be some kind of electronics and probably a battery, for this technology to work. That's just too much that can and will fail. Especially during the middle of a life/death incident. Not only that, but, I seriously doubt that these new smart guns will be high quality guns that will compare with guns that I buy like my Dan Wesson 1911's or my vintage Colt Python, HK P7M13 pistols, etc. Even if they did, like the S&W Hillary Hole lock on their revolvers, I wouldn't want one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,003 Posts
Making money with a small business— any business for that matter — is tough enough when you have a good product/service to sell.

And here, we do not have a good product. The only people touting this product are those who don’t buy the product in the first place; they just like to tell others what to do, as in “rules for thee, not for me”.

There will be some initial sales to collectors of curio firearms.

Beyond that, future bankruptcy is predictable.
No, no there won't. I collect firearms - like the HK P7M13/M8, vintage Colt Python, Walther P38, etc. and there's nothing novel, curious, historical, or even remotely interesting about "smart guns." They're a liability not a curio. For someone that finds stupid, failed guns to be of interest, they might be interested in wasting their money on these items which will never accrue in value. As an example, no collector finds the S&W Hillary Hole revolvers to be of any interest at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
448 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,121 Posts
No, no there won't. I collect firearms - like the HK P7M13/M8, vintage Colt Python, Walther P38, etc. and there's nothing novel, curious, historical, or even remotely interesting about "smart guns." They're a liability not a curio. For someone that finds stupid, failed guns to be of interest, they might be interested in wasting their money on these items which will never accrue in value. As an example, no collector finds the S&W Hillary Hole revolvers to be of any interest at all.
^^^
Indeed possible. If no sales to curio collectors, bankruptcy will come even sooner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,595 Posts
Predictable responses. Nothing good can come out of this, eh?

Someone I know has Magna-triggers installed in revolvers set for his wife. His wife a petite woman. They both have agreed that in case of a perp getting close enough to her she is more likely to lose the control over the gun. Magna trigger is a very simple magnetic device and has been on the market for a long time. No bankruptcy etc.

Technology will eventually get to where reliability of these devices will not be an issue. Thoughtful and open minded users will find applications for them. As long as attempts to use smart tech for gun control are defeated, they will be just another tool in a toolbox.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,595 Posts
Yet again, Ive been able to read your message. So the electronic crap you typed it on has gone 2 for 2 to convey your distrust.

Just curious, do you avoid air travel?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,728 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yeah, good luck with that. I don't expect those will be flying off the shelves. I expect some investor is about to learn a very expensive lesson in understanding the market.
Flying off the shelves is not my concern. I am concerned that if these companies demonstrate this crap "works", the Fed will then force all guns to have the technology. Kinda like seatbelts for cars.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,728 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I've mentioned this before.
I do work with some pretty hi-tech electronics for a living...more than 40 years.
I don't trust electronic crap any further than I can spit.
It's not you who has to trust it. Driverless big rigs are in-testing now and will be on the roads within a year or so (LIDAR and such can easily be defeated by external bad actors)! Toxic lithium was a choice for eV's. It's not a matter of what you think, it's a matter of what idiot lawmakers think.

Does this "smart" technology require a battery?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,728 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yet again, Ive been able to read your message. So the electronic crap you typed it on has gone 2 for 2 to convey your distrust.

Just curious, do you avoid air travel?
Thank to air travel, we have lots and lots of data that proves autonomous systems have nasty fail rates when placed into very dynamic operating environments. Vehicles on the ground will have similar fate. US military for some reason will not adopt autonomous drones/robots as a weapon for the arsenal toolbox. Enhancing bi-directional user feedback seems to be the norm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,121 Posts
^^^
Indeed so.

Probably most critical electronic devices are backed-up by duplicate devices. Pretty standard architecture for core router/switch installations in corporate/government/hospital environs. Pretty standard in aircraft manufacture, where there’s often not just one backup system, but two.

Reason is simple. These devices are not 100% reliable.

How about the “check engine” light on many autos? How reliable is it, especially 10-15 years down the road.

Now, when that smart gun fails when needed, what’s the backup? Probably the Coroner? And will anyone ever know?



Aside from all this, it’s a weak solution in circumstances where the problem is a malfunctioning human brain. The condition of Stupidity has always been difficult to overcome.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 45ofcourse
1 - 20 of 154 Posts
Top