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I've been in practice 15 years, and my group manages, conservatively, a few thousand patients with pacemakers. I think in my own clinic I have a couple of hundred. We've seen cases where they malfunctioned or were replaced due to recalls. Fatalities due to malfunctioning devices have been described in literature but are very rare. Much much less frequent than stoppages with handguns.

Now, I have to interrogate a re-program a pacemaker probably once a week. Doing that requires placing a wand on patients chest. I invite you to tell me more about 50 ways to make a device stop working from distance.




Dunno about you but Ive issues with unauthorized use of my property. My house has a lock, so does my car. Bank account has a password, as my do my computers and a cellphone. I would not invest into its development but if smart tech for guns was available, I would definitely evaluate it from standpoint of reliability, potential for hacking or remote control, ease of use, costs, etc etc.
You might be the only possibly interested buyer here (and of course, if interested, that’s o.k.), but I’m still not sensing a real eagerness, even in your thinking, to buy one of these.

We still have zero (0) “I can’t wait for mine” customers among everyone who has posted here.

Not a good market survey result for the gun’s seller, pretty close to hopeless in a free market….I’m recalling studies from a long-ago Marketing 101 course in business school.

A coerced-by-government-decree market could possibly be different, but coercion is the only chance.
 

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Like with smart autos , you do not need to pay attention to what you're doing. Don't have to lock it or watch where the muzzle is pointed. If you have an accident , it's not your fault! It's technology's fault! Most likely a logic defect in the gun/car/etc microchips. Just keep that lawyers number in your phone!
 

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Like with smart autos , you do not need to pay attention to what you're doing. Don't have to lock it or watch where the muzzle is pointed. If you have an accident , it's not your fault! It's technology's fault! Most likely a logic defect in the gun/car/etc microchips. Just keep that lawyers number in your phone!
Perfect for the next Baldwin homicide! Alec can blame the malfunctioning chip next time he kills another movie cinematographer. :giggle:
 

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Hey that was Tom Selleck. ^^^ I never saw that movie, but I had lunch with him and sold him a holster many years ago.
And now he's in commercials trying to get you to re-fi your house. :rolleyes:

How far we have fallen since Quigley. :(

At least (even though known as a Black Conservative) he's not as annoying in a commercial as Jimmy J.J. Walker. o_O

Take your "moonneyy" and shove it. :poop:
 

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I've mentioned this before.
I do work with some pretty hi-tech electronics for a living...more than 40 years.
I don't trust electronic crap any further than I can spit.
This.

I will bet my safety on 100+ year old technology invented by John Moses Browning.
 

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Why "smart guns" won't shake up the gun market – Bearing Arms

From the article:

SmartGunz would not say which law enforcement agencies are testing its weapons, which are secured by radio frequency identification. SmartGunz developed a model selling at $1,795 for law enforcement and $2,195 for civilians, said Tom Holland, a Kansas Democratic state senator who co-founded the company in 2020.

They won't say which law enforcement agencies are testing or what kind of testing whether at the shooting range or just daily carry never to be drawn and fired.

A democrat, you know he's got our best interest at heart. I think I'll just save another $1000.00 or so and buy a really nice 1911 in the 2 to 3 thousand range before I'd pay that for a smart gun.
 

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You might be the only possibly interested buyer here (and of course, if interested, that’s o.k.), but I’m still not sensing a real eagerness, even in your thinking, to buy one of these.
Nope. I am neither interested nor eager. I am simply keeping my mind open to an assessment of personal benefits vs detractors when, if ever, that tech becomes widely available.
From the article:

SmartGunz would not say which law enforcement agencies are testing its weapons, which are secured by radio frequency identification. SmartGunz developed a model selling at $1,795 for law enforcement and $2,195 for civilians, said Tom Holland, a Kansas Democratic state senator who co-founded the company in 2020.

They won't say which law enforcement agencies are testing or what kind of testing whether at the shooting range or just daily carry never to be drawn and fired.
They are full of it. What LE agency would be interested in a single stack 9 mm gun these days?
 

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Nope. I am neither interested nor eager. I am simply keeping my mind open to an assessment of personal benefits vs detractors when, if ever, that tech becomes widely available.


They are full of it. What LE agency would be interested in a single stack 9 mm gun these days?
Methinks you’re way too smart to go for one of these Dem-funded gizmos.

And keeping an open mind is a quality that‘s been consistent through your posts over many years. I wouldn‘t even try to change that.👍

I may be more of a blunt instrument...no way I’ll ever consider a firearm of this conception; and furthermore, I’m hoping for a quick bankruptcy of this Dem-backed entity, because I see it as a backdoor attempt, similar to universal background checks, to set the stage for a drastic assault on 2A rights. I don’t think it has a fair, non-coercive, marketable purpose.
 

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Discussion Starter · #129 ·
Down by UoA (Arizona) a car burglar broke into a car mid-day, took a few things, and a pistol. Such tech being discussed would prevent anyone else from using it. This prevention is of course, the viewpoint of the govt. An Apple airtag would perhaps be better, because then I show up to reclaim my property, and I am confident the criminal does not want to be looking at the biz end of a 30cal carbine.

As for those pacemakers, walk through a line of high intensity magnetic field and I suspect the pace thingy stops working. I can put a decent size magnetic field in my backpack, it really messes things up. One of the other 49, certain Rf frequencies, perhaps even modulated, will cause the pace thingy to stop working.
 

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How disappointing... we'll hopefully trying to work the kinks out of it will keep it off the shelves for a couple decades.
 

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Maybe if they can create a small camera in the rear sight that can do a retinal scan as your sighting a target then unlock a safety after recognizing your the rightful owner... Nah... that would be Blade Runner stuff!
 

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Just for curiosity — absolutely no effect on my negative views, the following is from their website:

“Will the government or anyone else be able to hack / remotely disable / modify my 9mm 1911 Sentry firearm?
No. The technology is entirely self-contained and can’t be accessed, hacked or manipulated remotely”


Of course, this doesn’t answer EMP-type concerns. If the chip is blown, I suspect the thing won’t work.

—-

Somehow, the following (from same webpage) is not a confidence builder for me:

“How long does the 9mm 1911 Sentry firearm stay unlocked?
As long as the shooter continues to depress the safety activation switch provided the shooter’s RFID-enabled ring is firmly gripping the hand grip.”

So I’d have to continue pressing the “safety activation switch” if the first shot doesn’t stop the BG? In the product’s defense, it’s possible that the switch is simply the traditional grip safety…but I don’t know this as fact.
 

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Or the power is out, or my hand is sweaty, bloody, dirty.

Sorry, I work in tech and I have seen it fail too many times especially when under pressure.
 

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Or the power is out, or my hand is sweaty, bloody, dirty.

Sorry, I work in tech and I have seen it fail too many times especially when under pressure.

🤣🤣🤣I’m sure the one (1) rechargeable battery and the USB wall charger will restore your confidence (wink, wink)…Oh, and don’t forget that ring when you leave home…or simply go to bed at night:

The 9mm 1911 Sentry – $2,195.00
(Product Deliveries Starting Q1 2022)
Civilian home defense package includes:

  • One 9mm 1911 Sentry firearm
  • One Sentry magazine with rechargeable battery power source
  • One ring containing an embedded RFID tag
  • One USB wall charger with recharging cable
  • Storage case
 

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Obviously, if you try to shoot off-handed due to injury, position of a wall/corner, etc., you’ll be out of luck.

Well, unless you also move the ring to the other hand.

Then again, it’s not designed for left-hand use:

“What about left handed / ambidextrous users?
The 9mm 1911 Sentry firearm is currently designed ONLY for right–handed shooters.”

 

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It would not be long before the hackers figure out a way to bypass the smart phone app and or use it to fire the guns anyway. I bet the police and military would want a way to jam the smart gun tech so it can't be fired at them too. I sorta feel like it is stupid at this time, as if you have to launch your smart phone app and enter a PIN, as well as the fingerprint ID, it tends to defeat that moment when you really need to draw it out to use it. But we will be seeing lots of horror stories out of New Jersey about what a disaster it is if they go into full production with smart guns. The RFID isn't all that bad though. But that newcomer gun company has to prove that their guns are reliable first. It won't be any good if the guns are stovepiping, fail to feed, fail to fire, breaks something, etc.

That SmartGunz company is out of their minds with about a $2,200 price for their plain Jane Smart pistols. Very few people will be buying them at that price. Even the police won't be interested much as they have been defunded and are cash strapped as well.
 

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As for those pacemakers, walk through a line of high intensity magnetic field and I suspect the pace thingy stops working. I can put a decent size magnetic field in my backpack, it really messes things up. One of the other 49, certain Rf frequencies, perhaps even modulated, will cause the pace thingy to stop working.
Unless you hold your magnetic field over my chest for a bit, your backpack is not going do anything to my pacemaker.
These days we're able to get many pacemaker patients through MRI - those same MRI machines that are known to discharge guns through magnetic fields.


Magnets can certainly mess with pacemakers but none of that has any practical implication for a remote compromise of a pacemaker or ICD, especially en masse, even in theory. In practice, every time we need to turn off a device, we need to put our hands on a patient.
 

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For this thing to work, I presume that it must be in C-1. I wonder how well that will go over with people who are fearful of firearms to begin with. But maybe they won’t know enough to even have that pang of worry that’s common to newcomers to 1911s. Ignorance is bliss. Prison guard use is more understandable…but prisoners will also take note of everything, including the ring…and the finger on which the ring sits.

A 1911’s typically light trigger pull also might not be the best idea for novice users who are fearful of firearms. Which appears to be their civilian target market. E.g., their website mentions “…especially appealing to people intimidated by traditional firearms.”

Indeed, what could go wrong with this type of firearm/device in the hands of someone “intimidated by traditional firearms”.
 

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Flying off the shelves is not my concern. I am concerned that if these companies demonstrate this crap "works", the Fed will then force all guns to have the technology. Kinda like seatbelts for cars.
When the FBI, the Secret Service, all state and local law enforcement agencies adapts the technology, I will trust it. Now, how do I get my flintlocks to be "safe guns"?
 

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Discussion Starter · #140 ·
When the FBI, the Secret Service, all state and local law enforcement agencies adapts the technology, I will trust it. Now, how do I get my flintlocks to be "safe guns"?
The agencies you mentioned, why would their ill-derived decisions be a metric for your decision making process?
 
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