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Yes, either that or one with a face like those on USGI triggers; rounded with light checkering.
 

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I really like the smooth trigger. I am saving a little gun toy stash for a new firing system for my Kimber and will include a smooth trigger.

Enjoy;
 

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For a carry gun, I'd imagine a serrated trigger face is probably just ever so slightly, marginally safer. But in my experience, I can't shoot a serrated trigger for extended periods, it's just too uncomfortable, and throws me off too much. I'm beginning to think the best method is to choose based on use.
 

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Can you explain your reasoning, Wes? I'd never heard any statements about safety bfore.
 

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Well, I'm only a novice, so I can only offer limited insight compared to an experienced shooter/instructor..but my consideration was, that on a sharply serrated trigger, you're both getting a more secure position on the trigger (less chance of slipping), and most importantly, it's giving you a strong tactile feedback as to how much force you're applying to the trigger. It just might make a bit of a difference in that ten-thousandths of a chance event, by telling you that your finger is on the trigger (by causing discomfort), and thus prevent you from firing before you're ready. Perhaps this doesn't apply to people with callused fingers. Perhaps it just ain't so in actual usage. But that's been my impression of why one might choose a serrated trigger for a carry gun.
 

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Well for me my fingers tips have gotten a little numb over the years. The serrated trigger tell me what part of my finger is on the trigger and it helps me keep the right part of my finger on the trigger. On a smooth trigger it is too easy for my finger to change position.
 

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I use a smooth trigger. On my bullseye gun I have a flat smooth trigger.
My trigger finger was broken and twisted so I don't shoot so much with the pad of my finger as the inside side of my fingertip so a smooth trigger is more comfortable for me.


 

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I started using smooth triggers on my revolvers. I was pulling shots to the right about a half inch. Put a smooth trigger on the Mod 29, shot right to point of aim. It also feels lighter .
 

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I, too like smooth triggers on all my firearms. I have heard that some bullseye shooters like the serrations as it helps consistently locate the pad of their finger, and improves their "feel". I had just never heard the "safety" angle before, so was curious.
 

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I'm not saying it necessarily is an appreciable factor, just that the thought had occured to me that it might be possible. It's probably more likely, though, that on any given gun the reason for putting a serrated trigger on was just to make it look more high-speed.
 

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Castillos Custom Actions

Castillos Custom Actions. Their ball bearing trigger is available smooth. I have two. :rock: As soon as I get another 1911, I will have three.



Robert
 

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I probably would if I had a short trigger as I do on my Browning P-35 or CZ-75 where I do have them, but on my Browning action guns I have long triggers & so grooved.

Smooth is okay if you are using the joint of your finger to do the work, but on the palm of the finger then the grooved trigger is my way of thinking & what I use.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Trigger Design

It seems that the majority of factory smooth triggers are found on D/A designs. The 1911 has a somewhat unique short/straight back design. I've always preferred a smooth trigger on revolvers. On my 1911's, so far, I've kept the serrations. Ray
 

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I've had cut and bleeding finger tips from the sharp edges of the serrated trigger, after shooting extended periods of time. I now use shooting gloves if I plan to shoot past 50 rounds. But I prefer the anti slip quality of the serration during a tactical situation.
 

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There's a middle road. My skin is very sensitive, especially my fingertips, so sharp serrations are quite painful. I've benefitted from a technique used by custom 1911 pistolsmiths. It's simply a matter of using a fine Swiss pillar file to contour the trigger by removing the outer row or two of serrations, then shoeshining the trigger with abrasive cloth to blend the contour and smooth the remaining serrations a little. The result is a trigger that doesn't hurt my fingers. More than that, it's a trigger that gives improved control because it allows more of my finger's surface to wrap around the trigger.

Nobody asked about Glock triggers but the serrated triggers on the compact and subcompact models present the same problem. The solution is to replace them with the smooth triggers Glock supplies with the full size models in each caliber. The part costs about $12 from Lone Wolf Distributors, the installation time is no more than a couple of minutes, and anyone who can disassemble and reassemble a Glock can do the installation. These are true drop in parts on Glocks, and in fact when Gaston Glock introduced the Glock 17 he demonstrated with one that he assembled on the spot from the scattered parts of several others he disassembled.

As for safety issues that might be related to the trigger's texture, I've been involved in shooting handguns for many years and haven't encountered any safety issue created by whether a trigger is smooth or serrated or checkered. My own experience is that none has been inherently safer or less safe than the other. And, to return to Glocks for a moment, the Glock 17 and other full size versions all are shipped with smooth triggers and are in daily use that way by law enforcement and the military. It would be a trivial matter for them to specify serrated triggers instead but, so far as I know, that has not be done anywhere. My recollection is a little fuzzy on the early history of 1911 triggers but I seem to recall that all of them delivered to the military were smooth and that serrated triggers weren't a big thing until the 1960s or so. I could be completely off base on that and I'm just too lazy to check the point. Someone with a better memory is sure to correct me if I'm wrong, and that's perfectly okay with me.
 
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