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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking of getting a full size Kobra to keep my KC company and was wondering whether Brown would mill snakeskin front cocking serrations into the slide?? Anyone with info would be appreciated - I've emailed Brown for answer as well.
 

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EB will not do it IMO. But I have seen other smiths that do. I saw a KC
with this done for sale last year. To be honest, it didn't look good to me.
The work was fine but it seemed too busy for my taste.

Regards,
Greyson
 

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Chuck! Your funny dude! :)

SS Serrations! To me, I don't know why ED wouldn't if you ask and pay for it. Even if it is a want and not a need, for looks or just preference. Let us know what response you get about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
...Brown said no.
 

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I wondered the same...

At ITTS tactical school, we did chamber checks often. Since I have a Kobra Karry, I had a hard time- stiff springs and lack of front serrations. These SWAT instructors all used the front serrations for chamber checks and not cocking. Three lines of snakeskin would have helped.
 

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hatidua said:
apparently the FBI didn't see the need for them when they ordered what is now called the Springfield PRO model which is devoid of them up front.

I don't mind them on other peoples guns but I'd not have bought my two Kobra's had they had them.
+1

Greyson
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
6285108 said:
Ed has good sense IMO
...oh come now, I doubt Ed would have done the work himself!!!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
hatidua said:
adding forward serrations to an Ed Brown gun could drastically affect resale value if that matters at all.
...it doesn't - but to address your concern a bit further, are you saying that the gun would be LESS valuable from a re-sale standpoint? I don't see how that could possibly happen - much less to a "drastic" degree.
:scratch:
 

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Kimber Dude said:
...it doesn't - but to address your concern a bit further, are you saying that the gun would be LESS valuable from a re-sale standpoint? I don't see how that could possibly happen - much less to a "drastic" degree.
:scratch:
This is easy to explain. I can do it in different mediums to make a point:

1. Common knowledge among gun shop owners that the more you customize
a gun the more you will lose on resale. An $800 gun with $200 worth of
work is not going to be worth $1000. The $200 of custom work is what
you wanted not the market place. So now you will have a gun that is
used AND has features many people wanting that model don't want.
So your potential chance of selling diminishes. Bottom line, customize
and get what you want. But plan on keeping it forever or you will lose
your a$$. (pun intended).

2. When a builder builds a spec house they always decorate with neutral or
earth tones. Reason is it will appeal to a larger market and those that
will paint a wall hot pink will have an easy time "seeing" what they want
to do. Ozzie and Harriet look at a model home and it is decorated with
bright pastels, and super expensive paisley wallpaper; they will have
a harder time looking beyond the "busy" to see their dream home
underneath. Result:They buy another home. Net result: builder has a home
he can't sell and the price drops.

Trick out a gun a great deal and you will lose money on resale. To see my
point go to gunsamerica and look at older "custom" guns. The latest and
greatest sights and parts back in the day are worthless today or are now
standard and no-longer considered custom.

Regards,
Greyson
 
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